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A Thread That Binds: Intro to Sephardic Food

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TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 07 April 2017 at 08:40
I had her try a "finger-tip" sample of the Aleppo pepper last night, and she said that it should be good, indicating that there were no troubles with it. I'll be sure to give it a little more grinding before adding it.

With that in mind, there's probably no actual need to cut the pepper with paprika, but I might do it anyway, just to be safe.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 08 April 2017 at 06:18
Ron, here's a variation on the theme from Stella's Sephardic Table. It's a bit more complex, but might be well worth the effort; particularly as a side dish for the fish cakes.

Personally, I'd season the flour with salt and white pepper for sure, and might even add some Aleppo pepper just to kick it up a notch.

BTW, something I should have known from my childhood, but which the Sephardic research has highlighted, is that matzoh meal makes a much better breading than plain flour. So, if it's available by you, give it a try.

KARNABIT FRITA
(Cauliflower Florets Stew)

     
1 large cauliflower, about 2 14 pounds

For coating:
½ cup all-purpose flour or matzoh meal
3 eggs, lightly beaten

For shallow frying:
Vegetable or grape-seed oil

For the vegetable base:
¼ cup olive oil
1 large onion, roughly chopped
Reserved cauliflower leaves and stalks
1 large carrot, diced
1 large potato, diced
4 spring onions (scallions), sliced
1 cup peeled, seeded and chopped ripe tomatoes or canned chopped tomatoes
½ tsp sugar
Sea salt and finely ground white pepper
1 cup hot chicken or vegetable stock
2 tbls fresh lemon juice
½ cup hot water

Prep the cauliflower: Cut off the green leaves and stalks from the cauliflower, slice them and reserve for the vegetable base. Break the cauliflower florets off the stem and clean thoroughly by soaking in cold, salted water for 15 minutes. Rinse well and drain. Steam the florets over boiling salted water for about 7 minutes or until just tender. Be careful not to overcook the cauliflower. Refresh with cold water and drain in a colander.

Heat one inch oil in a deep frying pan over medium-high heat. Coat the florets with flour and then with beaten egg, a few at a time. Cook the florets in batches until they are crisp and golden on all sides. Lift out with a slotted spoon and drain on paper towels.

Make the vegetable base: Heat the oil in a large, shallow, oven-to-table casserole over a medium heat. Toss in the onion, reserved cauliflower leaves and stalks, carrot, potato and scallions, and cook for 5 minutes, stirring. Stir in the tomatoes, sugar, salt and pepper and pour in the hot stock. Bring to a boil. Cover, reduce the heat and simmer for 39 minutes, stirring occasionally. Pour in the lemon juice and hot water. Taste and adjust seasoning.

Arrange the cauliflower on top of the vegetable base. Cover and continue to simmer for 10 minutes.

To serve: Preheat the oven to 350F. Bake, uncovered, for 15 minutes or until the cauliflower floret tops are crisp and golden brown. Serve piping hot.

But we hae meat and we can eat
And sae the Lord be thanket
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10 April 2017 at 08:26
Excellent, Brook - thanks!

I'll present both to The Beautiful Mrs. Tas, and see which way she wants to go ~
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Margi Cintrano Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10 April 2017 at 08:58


Lovely soup / starter recipe Brook .. And may I add, extraordinarily healthy too ..

Thank you for posting ..
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11 April 2017 at 04:18
Well, ya know, Margi, Sephardic food is essentially Mediterranean. Which, by and large, is inherently healthy.

This particular dish originated on the Isle of Rhodes, where it was often served as a vegetarian main dish.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Margi Cintrano Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11 April 2017 at 04:52
Brook, 

Definitely Mediterranean and simply such a varied versatile and  an amazingly aromatic group of cuisines too.  Spanish Sephardic,  Moroccan Sephardic, Italian, Greek, Turkish, Egyptian,  Southern  French, Portuguese, Lebanese, Syrian, Israeli etcetra ..

It has been making a huge comeback particulary in  Toledo, Spain, 50 kilometres south of Madrid.

The common factors that link these Sephardic Dishes are:  The Combining of a protein source with fresh fruit. 

Another is the use of dried fruits and protein ..  ( Figs, Dates, Walnuts, Almonds, Pistachios etcétera.)


Of course the avoidance of Pork Products, or combining dairy products with meat products.


I would love to do the Dried Apricot & Apple Chicken ..  Gorgeous recipe  ..  

It is on the list ..  I shall let you know when I prepare to make it .. For May 15th, a bank holiday celebrating " The Homage to Farmers & Shepherds " ( Saint Isidore / Saint Isidro ) .. 

Dried apricots are a staple here .. I have to re-read your recipe !! 

Truly an amazingly spectacular grouping of récipes. You should really author a book !  And you could  put on PDF in Spanish, French,  Italian and German as well / and any other Language you have preferences for ..

The selling on Amazon shall always produce income ..

   
Have a wonderful Holiday.

Kind regards.
Margi.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 April 2017 at 09:06
Originally posted by HistoricFoodie HistoricFoodie wrote:

Although I’ve continued exploring Sephardic cuisine, I admit to being remiss in posting recipes. Partly I’ve been busy, and partly I’m not sure if members are finding them useful.
     
However, I just made Keftes De Peshkado; Sephardic fish cakes from the Island of Rhodes. And I can state with no fear of contradiction that these are the best fish cakes I’ve ever eaten. So figured I better share.

Given the current prices of fish, not only are these incredibly tasty, they’re affordable as well. Using salmon and cod as the fish, the protein cost came to only 62 cents each. Being generous, with the other ingredients, we’re probably talking 75 cents each for the finished cakes.

Two comments: Using the author’s suggestion, I measured with a 1 ¾” disher. Three of them make a reasonable portion (although Friend Wife and I were content with just two each). I also seasoned the dusting flour with salt and white pepper.

Here’s the recipe:

KEFTES DE PESHKADO
(Rhodian Fish Cakes)


1 stalk celery in chunks     
½ carrot in chunks
1 ½ tsp fresh lemon juice     
3 black peppercorns
1 tsp salt     
Handful of parsley stems
1 lb 2 oz mixed fish filets (hake, salmon, cod, etc.)
5 oz potatoes     
A few fresh dill stalks
1 tbls olive oil     
1 egg lightly beaten
1 tbls scallion, finely chopped     
1 ½ tbls finely chopped parsley
1 tbls finely chopped dill     
½ tsp salt
Pinch white pepper

For coating:     
½ cup white flour     
1-2 eggs, lightly beaten
½ cup bread crumbs or matzoh meal

Oil for frying plus 1 tbls butter

Put the celery, carrot, lemon juice, peppercorns, salt and parsley stalks in a pan of boiling water. Reduce to a simmer. Add the fish and cook for 15 minutes or until fish flakes easily. Flake fish with fingers, discarding any skin or bones. Chop carrot finely.

Simmer the potatoes with dill stalks in salted water until they are tender. Drain, remove dill, and mash or pass through a ricer. Mix in the olive oil.

Combine fish with the potato, carrot, egg, scallions, dill, parsley, salt and pepper.

Shape the fish into balls about the size of an egg and flatten slightly. Or use a 1 ¾” disher. Dip cakes into flour, then egg, then matzoh meal. Transfer to a tray and chill, covered, until ready to fry.

Heat 1” of oil and the butter. Fry cakes, in batches, until golden brown and crisp, about 3 minutes per side. Drain on a rack or paper towels. Serve hot.


We had this for supper last night - and yes, you folks do need to try it!

We prepared ours with cod and tilapia, and the results were very good. My #3 son, Mike, made them while The Beautiful Mrs. Tas and I were on our way home from work, and he did a pretty good job.I really liked the way that the carrot and celery provided a nice balance to the fish; the dill, lemon, pepper and scallions were also a very nice touch. This dish comes together really nicely, and I can't help but continue to think that Sephardic cuisine is among the best undiscovered cuisines that one could hope to find.

The rest of the family really enjoyed them, as well - their only criticism was that the fish cakes could have had a little salt and/or lemon at serving. My solution: a salt and pepper shaker, and lemon wedges.

Very, very good stuff, Brook - thank you for the introduction to this!

Ron
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Margi Cintrano Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22 April 2017 at 06:28
Ron,  

What did you use to bread your fish ?

Yes, I believe, a couple of pinches of salt / black pepper options, would be obvious .. 



Have a lovely weekend.

 
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