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Acadian Chicken Fricot

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TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
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    Posted: 24 August 2017 at 12:42
Acadian Chicken Fricot

We have a terrible lack of Canadian recipes here; because of this, I am always keeping my eye out for one. I found this Acadian recipe at Saveur's online Magazine, which looks pretty good. I intend to try it, one of these days.

Quote Chicken Fricot



In this classic Acadian comfort dish, savory - the pungent, peppery herb - adds a piney zest to the dumplings, which puff when dropped into the simmering broth.

To serve 8:


For the Soup

4 tablespoon unsalted butter
1 teaspoon olive oil
2 pounds boneless, skinless chicken thighs
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste
3 cloves garlic, roughly chopped
1 large yellow onion, finely chopped
1 medium carrot, roughly chopped
1 stalk celery, roughly chopped
6 cups chicken stock
4 sprigs savory
1 large russet potato, peeled and cut into 1-inch pieces


For the Dumplings:

1 cup flour
1 tablespoon finely chopped savory
2 teaspoons baking powder
1⁄2 teaspoon kosher salt
1⁄2 cup milk

To make the soup:

Heat butter and oil in a 6-quart saucepan over medium-high heat. Season chicken with salt and pepper. Working in batches, cook the chicken, flipping once, until browned, 5 to 7 minutes. Transfer chicken to a plate and set aside.

Add garlic, onion, carrot, and celery to the pan. Cook, stirring occasionally, until soft, about 7 minutes. Return chicken and its juices to the pan with the stock and savory. Bring to a boil, then reduce heat to medium-low. Cook, covered, until chicken is tender, 8 to 10 minutes. Add potato and cook, until tender, about 8 minutes more.

Using a slotted spoon, transfer chicken to a cutting board and discard the savory. When chicken is cool enough to handle, shred into large pieces and return to the pan. Bring the soup to a simmer.

To make the dumplings:

Whisk flour, savory, baking powder, and salt in a bowl. Stir in milk until a thick batter forms. Using a 1-ounce scoop or 2 tablespoons, drop batter into simmering soup. When dumplings are puffed and slightly firm, cover the pan and continue to cook about 5 minutes more.

http://www.saveur.com/article/recipes/chicken-fricot
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HistoricFoodie View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 25 August 2017 at 06:49
That does sound good, Ron.

Summer savory--which is what's usually meant when just "savory" is specified--is one of those herbs that transforms when dried (like basil). So it's important that only fresh savory be used in a dish like this.

Winter savory does retain its flavor when dried, but presents a different flavor profile than the summer stuff.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 25 August 2017 at 08:43
Interesting is that it is - when you look at it - basically just a chicken soup with dumplings. But, there are a couple of little tweaks that make it interesting, and I assume those tweaks define it as Acadian; the savory, for instance.

We've discussed this before, but I wonder how much of the recipe is "cheffed up" a bit by Saveur. The olive oil seems incongruous, but I don't know enough to say for sure; and, in the end, it probably doesn't matter much because some sort of fat must be used.
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