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Adapting Historic Recipes?

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Poll Question: I'm interested in how recipes get adapted.
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AK1 View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote AK1 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 July 2012 at 11:00
That's interesting Brook, when I click on the link, it takes me right there.

As for documentation, I'd like if it was there, but,as you said, I also don't think it's that important to this goup.
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TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 July 2012 at 11:30
hey, guys - just caught these replies. a few comments:
 
documentation is great, i think people should use as much as they feel comfortable using. for me, i usually refer back to where i got it from, plus some supplementary info from other online sources such as wiki etc. but that's my own limitation and i have no problem if anyone wants to go deeper. links, excerpts with citations bibliographies etc. are welcome! if it gets too "academic," no worries - anyone who has questions or needs clarification is always free to ask.Handshake
 
the fotw series were definitely the inspiration to start this forum, but in my mind they are only a beginning, not the end! since they were and still are my primary resource, they are what i tend to use (along with the culinaria series), but as my resources expand, i use others. anyone is always welcome and encouraged to bring in ideas, resources, and any other content from any source - the ultimate goal is to build this site as a great library of knowledge for anyone who is interested in the same thing's we're interested in, at any level!Thumbs Up
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Rod Franklin View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Rod Franklin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 July 2012 at 12:15
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HistoricFoodie View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 July 2012 at 13:59
That did it, Rod. Thanks!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Rod Franklin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 July 2012 at 16:35
Yer welcome. Now you owe me.Smile
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 July 2012 at 05:04
Better I should owe you than do you out. Wink
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Margi Cintrano Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22 September 2012 at 15:36
Brook,
 
I happened to have some extra time, and went through some older threads.
 
How is your project going on Adopting Historic Recipes ?
 
The Mediterranean is steeped profoundly in historic recipes, especially in the hamlets, villages and small towns as well, and can be seen with the spoon tradition main lunches of the big cities.
 
Look forward to hearing about your latest event.
 
Kindest.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Karl Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 25 September 2012 at 18:02
Originally posted by HistoricFoodie HistoricFoodie wrote:

Likely not, Rod, as many of the ingredients are untranslatable and, quite possibly, no longer exist even if we knew what they were. The Roman recipes, however, have been translated and reproduced numerous times.
 
If you're interested in food history, but not ready to do the sort of research Karl and I take for granted, see if you can find a copy of The Horizon Cookbook and Illustrated History of Eating and Drinking Through The Ages.
 
It's long out of print, having been published in 1968, but I'm sure it's available on the used book  market. If you can find it, it's a nice introductory volume on various cuisines and dining cultures, from Mesapotamia through the 1920s. And it includes more than 600 recipes to help you experience those cuisines.
 
Many times, books about the foods of ancient times include recipes that are interpretations of the cuisine. While not, strictly speaking, entirely accurate, they can actually make it easier to experience the food, because the recipes use modern ingredients and methods. For example, Miriam Vamosh's Food At The Time of the Bible includes ten pages of recipes based on dishes mentioned in the Bible, even though the Bible, itself, contains no recipes. Each is preceded by a Biblical quote germane to the dish. For example:
 
Jacob's Lentil Soup
"Then Jacob gave Esau some bread and some lentil stew" (Gen. 25:34)
 
1 1/2 cups split red lentils
6 cups chicken or vegetable stock
1 medium onion, cubed
2 sticks chopped celery
1 leek, chopped
1 carrot, cubed
1/2 tsp ground cumin
1 tbls white wine vinegar
Salt and freshly ground black pepper
1 medium onion, sliced
Olive oil
 
Put the lentils in a pot with the stock and vegetables and bring to a boil. Simmer for 30 minutes, until the lentils have disintegrated. If too thick, add water. Add cumin and vinegar and season to taste. Fry the sliced onion in the olive oil until almost caramelized and add to the soup. Serve hot with croutons.


I was surprised to find my wife picking out red lentils the other week since she tends to absolutely hate anything that resembles beans but it was for basically this same recipe.  She went to seminary school where she learned about this.  It took me a while to make the connection for why it seemed so familiar.  Thanks again. 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09 March 2018 at 09:47
I'm bringing this thread back to the top, as Brook and I have been discussing a few aspects of the general topic.

Recently, my son Roger and I have gotten in the habit of watching an episode or three of Chef Walter Staib's "A Taste of History" series on Amazon Prime. For those of you who have experienced being the parent of a teenager, you know that this is a rare and unusual event, when one actually wants to spend a little time with a parent engaged in a common interest.

We just finished watching a three-episode segment on Staib's cooking experience at Thomas Jefferson's Monticello, and I was pretty interested in it. Some of the recipes looked really good, although I am certain they were slightly adapted. The thing that struck me most was that Staib made a definite attempt to serve dishes that he knew (instinctively or through documentation) would have been served at Monticello, and used quite a few vegetables from Jefferson's Monticello garden to do the cooking. Staib was like a 5-year-old on Christmas Morning with this experience, and it was inspiring to see.
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