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Angelique?

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pitrow View Drop Down
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    Posted: 27 October 2011 at 13:55
Not sure exactly where to put this, since I'm not sure exactly what it is, so go ahead and move this if you have a better section for it, but this was my best guess.

I was perusing an old cookbook (1938) of my wife's grandma and I came across a recipe, I can't for the life of me remember what the recipe was for but I'm pretty sure it was some kind of dessert, anyway it called for angelique. I've searched the internet as best I could and I still am clueless as to what it is.

Anyone have a clue?
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27 October 2011 at 14:06
that's a new one on me, mike - i've never heard of it. do you remember any of the details of the recipe such as the other ingredients or the method? sith some details, i bet we could find it.
 
was it one of the dutch books, or in english?
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote pitrow Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27 October 2011 at 14:11
I don't, but I'll see if I can find it again tonight.

It was an english cookbook, apparently from the Watkins company to push their line of spices and extracts because every other ingredient was "WATKINS lemon syrup" or "WATKINS cinnamon".

It may have been something unique to their company, but it didn't have the Watkins name associated with it like everything else in the book.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27 October 2011 at 14:15
i scanned through www.watkinsonline.com, but didn't see anything ~ that doesn't mean much because if it is an older cookbook, it could very well be discontinued as a product. there is a pretty big recipe section that might be worth cruising through ~
 
we'll find it!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27 October 2011 at 14:20
check this out:
 
 
there's 5 or 6 pages of recipes from watkins 1938 cookbook. i took a quick look, but didn't see anything like angelique - the most exotic thing i saw was citron.
 
might be worth checking out.....
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote pitrow Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27 October 2011 at 14:25
yeah I'll have to look through the cookbook again tonight.

BTW, while flipping through it I found a tiny little pocketbook, about the size of a business card and maybe 20 pages tops, from 1920-somthing. It was a handful of recipes from The Oregonian (our local paper) along with some of the winning recipes from a contest they had. Pretty cool. I love finding stuff like that. Big smile
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27 October 2011 at 14:28
yep, when we were cleaning out my wife's grandmother's stuff after she passed away, we found a lot of neat little things like that, including a pamphlet of "7-up recipes" and other similar product recipe pamphlets from campbells etc. also a really enat one from the florida orange grower's association with a lot of neat orange-centered recipes.
 
i did a quick google search of "watkins cookbook" 1938 - it had a LOT of lsitings for ones that are on sale, but every now and then, tehre was a recipe from the book - might be worth a little research, but when you find out, either onlione or at home, let us know, and post the recipe, because now someone HAS to try it!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Melissa Mead Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27 October 2011 at 16:28
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Daikon Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27 October 2011 at 20:27
I suspect it is the herb angelica (http://www.sallybernstein.com/food/columns/gilbert/angelica_herb.htm), which is called angelique in French (e.g., liqueur d'angélique).

All parts of the plant can be used, it is merely a matter of when each part is at its peak.The roots are best in the fall of the first year; the stems and leaves are at their peak in the spring of the second year; and the seeds are ready for use when mature.Angelica's flavor is delicate and sweet; reminiscent of celery. In fact, it is often called wild celery. Its origin is northern Europe and Asia. Many people in the cold Northern regions such as Siberia and Finland consider Angelica a vegetable, and eat the stems raw, sometimes spread with butter, although I find them rather strong and astringent in this form. For a milder taste, try chopping the stems and roasting them with onions. This makes a wonderfully caramelized side dish for pork.

Because of its celery like flavor, Angelica has a natural affinity with fish. Often the leaves are minced and used as a part of a court boullion to season poaching liquid. The leaves have a stronger, clean taste and make a interesting addition to salads. Laplanders wrap fish in the leaves to act as a preservative on long journeys because of its antimicrobial properties, in addition to imparting its delicate taste. The chopped stems are frequently added to stewed fruits (rhubarb and plums in particular). It doesn't add much of its own flavor, but reduces tartness and lessens the need for sugar. Use the leaves in a similar manner when cooking squash or pumpkin to bring out their natural sweetness. The roots and seeds are used to flavor herb liqueurs such as Benedictine, gin, absinthe, and Chartreuse. When ground into a powder the root has a stronger earthy flavor, and is used in cookies, cakes, breads and muffins.

But perhaps the most familiar use of Angelica is in its candied form. The stems are sugared and colored and used extensively in decorating cakes and desserts. It is Angelica that was the original green candy in fruit cakes. Angelica is making its way into the mainstream. Just today one of our beverage distributors brought us a sample of a "health drink." I was pleasantly surprised to read that Angelica was one of the ingredients. All parts of the plant have medicinal properties, and has long been used in the treatment of respiratory ailments, as well as an aid to digestion. In fact most all varieties of Angelica (and there are over 50) possess medicinal qualities.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 October 2011 at 08:39
i think you might have nailed it, daikon - when i was reading the description, i recognized that i had heard of it before, but only once or twice and it was quite a while ago.
 
good sleuthing!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote pitrow Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 October 2011 at 09:05
Awesome! Thank you!

I looked for probably an hour and a half last night for the recipe again, but I couldn't find it. I was starting to think I'd imagined the whole thing! lol.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 November 2016 at 10:57
Here's an article that includes some information on the use of Angelica in Icelandic foodways:

http://www.saveur.com/iceland-restaurants-cuisine
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gonefishin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 08 November 2016 at 06:11
Originally posted by TasunkaWitko TasunkaWitko wrote:

yep, when we were cleaning out my wife's grandmother's stuff after she passed away, we found a lot of neat little things like that, including a pamphlet of "7-up recipes" and other similar product recipe pamphlets from campbells etc. also a really enat one from the florida orange grower's association with a lot of neat orange-centered recipes.
 

    Wow, that is so nice Tas...that is certainly something to pass along Smile
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 08 November 2016 at 15:50
It was some pretty good stuff, Dan - unfortunately, I think they are packed away at the moment!

If I dig them up, I might see about scanning them and sharing them, for those interested. It truly is a window into the time period, and I always enjoy the artwork of such things, for some reason.
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