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Apfelwein

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TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
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    Posted: 14 April 2015 at 22:01
Apfelwein
Apple Wine

I can't decide whether to post this in "Germany" (where it originated and probably belongs) or in the "Midwest/Great Plains" section of North America (where my personal connection to it is), so I'll put it here for now, and sort it out later.

I was recently introduced to the treasure that is Apfelwein by a fellow on another forum named "EdWort," who lives in the US but has strong family ties in Germany. He has a thorough and detailed post about it here, which you can read, if you want to:
 
http://www.homebrewtalk.com/showthread.php?t=14860
 
I barely made it through the first page of the thread before deciding that this one was too German for me not to try - it also triggered a few memories that I hadn't thought about in quite a while, so I made it my mission last week (April 8th, to be exact) to give this a go. Here is some background on the subject, along with an accounting of my attempt at this traditional German beverage.
 
Fair warning: I am absolutely incapable of brevity, so grab a cup of coffee, a bottle of home-brewed beer...or perhaps a glass of apfelwein...before proceeding!
 
As I said, this one quickly became yet another labour of love for me, as it has some personally-significant family ties. My family is part of an "ethnic group" (for lack of a better term) known as "Germans from Russia," which means that they originated in Germany (usually in what is now Southwestern Germany and Alsace), then migrated to the Russian Empire at the invitation of Catherine the Great and her descendents in order to set up "colonies" and farm the rich Russian, Ukrainian and Crimean soil. Specifically, my family belonged to the sub-group called Schwarzmeerdeutsche (Black Sea Germans), settling in what is now Ukraine between Crimea and Bessarabia (modern-day Moldova). Later on, under the tyrannical rule of successive Russian Emperors, conditions became untenable for these stubborn, freedom-loving Germans, and many of them took their agricultural talents to the American Midwest, the Canadian prairie and to Argentina, where they still have close-knit, thriving communities today. The ones who stayed behind were to eventually suffer extremely brutal oppression that could be called "ethnic cleansing" at best - and "genocide" at worst - but that's another discussion.
 
In any case, to get back on track, my direct German ancestors emigrated from Sulz, on the Beresan River in Ukraine, to what is now Dunn County, North Dakota, where they took up a rural life and thrived. We know that they brewed beer there, because the hops are still growing wild there, and I intend to take a trip "back home" with my father this spring in order to bring back some cuttings/rhizomes from these hops in an attempt to grow them here. 
 
Eventually, my grandfather came along, which of course led to me. My grandfather was an avid wood-worker and gardener, very close to the land - and as I get older, I find it more and more compelling for me to emulate his simple, self-sufficient lifestyle, hence my interests in things such as charcuterie, gardening - and lately, woodworking, brewing, cheese-making...and wine-making. 
 
My grandfather made a lot of wine - I don't remember him actually making any, but my dad does, and together, we are working on re-creating some of the wines that my grandfather made - chokecherry wine will most likely be our first "official" project, as we both recently got home wine-making kits and we each have a supply of chokecherries, carefully packaged and frozen since last fall. 
 
What I do remember, with great clarity, is that my grandfather made this same apfelwein that is described by EdWort in the link above; although, since he grew up in the US, he simply called it "apple wine," which would have been an English translation of the German term that he would have heard fro the older folks as a child. I remember seeing many bottles and juice jars of apple wine - in different shapes and sizes - lining the shelves of his basement. I also remember "borrowing" a couple of bottles of it during my teen years, and I to this day, I can still taste how good it was - nearly exactly as EdWort's descriptions say it is. It was a practical wine - without fuss or frivolity - very much like my grandfather, and as I was reading the opening posts by EdWort, I realised that this very stuff must the same as the "apple wine" that my grandfather would make, and set out to re-create it. 
 
As I said above, this is simple - very simple - perfectly suited for a rural lifestyle and "amateur" farmhouse winemakers who are not terribly concerned with enzymes, additives, vintages and so on. It is meant to be a way to make use of the abundance of fresh apples in the autumn, and will provide lasting refreshment throughout the year ahead. I managed to read through 71 pages of EdWort's extensive thread, and I had to chuckle at many of the people who replied and how they were excited at the idea of trying this traditional wine - and who then proceeded directly to modifying it, playing with the formulas and ratios, "twiddling with the knobs," and generally working very hard to create something else entirely. I am 100% certain that what these folks created was good stuff - but was it the traditional apfelwein that EdWort tried so hard to teach us about? I'm not so sure. 
 
My amusement was short-lived, however, when I saw that because I have no specialised shop for home-brewing supplies nearby (the closest one is 250 miles away), I would also have to make a couple of slight modifications of my own; I hope that they indeed indeed ended up being quite minor, and do not affect the characteristics of the traditional wine in an essential way.

Here are some vital statistics for my attempt at making apfelwein:
 
Batch size: EdWort makes it in 5-gallon batches, but my attempt was for 1 gallon (hey, it works for me!).
 
Apple juice: Back in the day, freshly-harvested apples from any local source would have been used; given the time of year, my location and my resources, this isn't much of an option for me, but that's alright, for there is a perfectly-acceptable, albeit modern alternative. EdWort reports consistently delicious results using store-bought apple juice, as long as said apple juice is free of preservatives (ascorbic acid is the sole "acceptable" additive), and is pasteurised. Due to the limited inventory of my local grocery, I only had one variety of apple juice that would "fit the bill" - it was a store brand that was 100% apple juice (good) and pasteurised (also good), but with no preservatives (which would have been bad). In short, it was just right! The flavour of this particular apple juice seeme very well balanced between sweet and tart to me, and I am quite happy with the choice. It is not the TreeTop brand that EdWort says he uses, but the next time I have the chance, i will definitely get some of that and try it for comparison.
 
Sugar: The addition of sugar to this beverage kicks up the ABV from 6% (which is what it would be with no added sugar) to 8.5%, which moves it from a cider and into the realm of wine. EdWort uses 2 pounds of corn sugar per 5 gallons and reports wonderful results; unfortunately, the closest corn sugar available to me that I am aware of is 250 miles away, so that option was out for me. I also suspect that my grandfather probably had none available to him, either, so this was no big deal. Reading the thread, it looked as though there are several "acceptable" alternatives, including brown sugar, which triggered some vivid memories from my childhood. I remember very clearly that my grandfather always eschewed white sugar in favour of brown sugar for everything that he sweetended; he had a little yellow TupperWare container of it on the table and would spoon or shake some of it out as needed. With that in mind, I decided to use dark brown sugar; I know that folks report a darker and slightly-sweeter end product with brown sugar, but this is not a problem for me, as I certainly remember his wine being darker-coloured and having a bit of sweetness to it, with a nice alcohol warmth (not heat) that would sneak up on you. So, brown sugar it would be - as mentioned above, EdWort uses 2 pounds of corn sugar per 5 gallons, so I scaled this amount down for a 1 gallon batch, and measured 4/10 of a pound to use for this attempt.
 
Yeast: EdWort uses Montrachet yeast, but this was also unavailable to me at the moment. What I did have was Premier Cuvée, which by all accounts (that I can find) is very similar to Montrachet, so I had no qualms about using it. EdWort uses a packet of yeast per 5 gallons of juice; I thought that my package had about a quarter of a packet in it, but when I poured it in, it looked closer to a third or half of a packet, and I am sure that this will work just fine.
 
That's all there is to it - everything needed to carry on a very old, German tradition in the 21st Century. Following EdWort's basic procedure, I sanitised my equipment, dropped about a quarter of the total apple juice (I had two half-gallon containers of it) into my fermenter, dissolved my sugar in the remaining half of the first container of juice, then poured it in. Next, I added my yeast and ran the remaining half-gallon of apple juice through the funnel in order to rinse everything down into the fermenter. The result was a nice, clear (at first), dark(ish) mixture that already looked very much like my grandfather's old apple wine; this gave me some reassurance that I should be on the right track.
 
EdWort starts right off with an airlock, rather than a blow-off tube; but old habits die hard, so I started out with a blow-off tube, which would get the apfelwein through the first few days of active fermentation.
 
The next morning, I was happy to see some very vigorous bubbling in the fermenter, letting me know that things were moving along very nicely. The apple juice had become quite cloudy over-night, which is something to be expected; according to EdWort's schedule, it will clear off very nicely at the four-week mark, and my limited experience with making apple cider agrees with this. 

Three days later, it appeared that the fermentation had slowed a quite bit, so I replaced the blow-off tube with an airlock. I will do my best to ignore it until the 4-week mark, and then see what we have at that time. After a total of perhaps six or eight weeks, I'll bottle it in the traditional German way - without any carbonation/priming sugar - and will then do my best to forget about it until early fall. If I get the chance, I will of course get a few more batches of apfelwein going, because I have a feeling that a gallon of this will not be nearly enough!
 
That's where things are for now; more as it happens, etc. &c. My thanks to EdWort for taking the time to introduce this tradition to me, especially as it re-kindled a few very treasured family memories.
 
Ron
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I started this project on April 8th; this morning - over 2 months later - I transferred the apfelwein to its permanent home, re-purposing a 1-gallon jug from a very good cider that comes from an awesome orchard in my mother's hometown:


The transfer went without incident; there was very little trub to sift through and my mini auto-siphon performed like a champ. My yield was just an ounce or two below the predicted gallon, and I can live with that.

Naturally, I had to try just a small sample! It was very good, and I am very sure that I achieved a measure of success with this. The apple comes through very nicely, and the apfelwein seems crisp, dry and refreshing, just as advertised, with a comforting, warm finish. It is not sweet, but there is something there that resembles sweetness - I'm nt enough of an expert to define it, but I like it.


I put the wine away to mature and develop its characteristics. I'll do my best to forget about it until around Halloween or Thanksgiving, at which time I'll sample it again. According to EdWort's timeline, It should really be coming into its glorious own by that time.

If I get the chance, I'll start another batch of this soon, to carry me through winter. It really is good stuff!


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Tom Kurth Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 June 2015 at 13:35
Was just thinking about a related topic this AM: What is the difference between hard cider and applejack? Now you've added a third contender, apple wine.

Quick research reveals the following: In most of the world, what we in the U.S. call 'apple cider' is known as apple juice. (I don't know what our 'apple juice' is called elsewhere.) 'Cider' equals what we call 'hard cider.' 'Apple wine' and presumably the German 'apfelwein' is the same as hard cider but has added sugar allowing it to develop a higher alcohol content. 'Applejack' is distilled hard cider. The traditional distillation method was frost distillation--let it freeze, then remove the ice crystals leaving a higher alcohol content. Repeat to desired strength level.

My interest in this was spurred by the fact that we live near orchard country. We're about eight miles from the Missouri River. The bluffs above the river are ideal orchard country since the late frosts are mollified by the cold air escaping down the bluffs. Old-timers at Waverly have been known to make a little 'jack' from time to time.

We routinely buy 'seconds' in the fall for eating and saucing. I'm hoping I can maybe get 'thirds' to squeeze. I wonder if I need to add any yeast if I start with fresh fruit? Any ideas?
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote drinks Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 June 2015 at 14:04
I think pasteurizing would be a good idea, I have found a real wine yeast actually does make a difference both in flavor and ABV,
However, be sure to try both ways so as to be sure.
I really doubt you would have the same yeast in the mix twice in a row.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Percebes Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 June 2015 at 18:25
Looks Great Ron

I put up 15 gallons of crabapple wine last September. 5 gallons each of 3 very distinct and separate varieties.
The first batch was bottled in 30 wine bottles a few months back and refermented in the bottle.

Tasty but cloudy and fizzy.
I ended up gifting it all away before the corks started exploding.

Second batch was bottled last weekend and sampled yesterday after letting the bottle shock dissipate a bit.

I was more than encouraged and what started as a single bottle to sample turned into 3 of us drinking 5 bottles.

Third batch is a pink variety of crabapple, but is still in the carboy as it refuses to clear.

Sugar was added to all batches initially to give a 7-8% ABV
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gonefishin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 June 2015 at 19:10
   We made our Hard Cider a while ago...and darn it, it's about time for another one!  We did use Pectic Enzyme, which helps break Pectin which is causing the haze.  The Cider was made from fresh, unpasteurized, apple cider from a local orchard...no additional sugars/ingredients added.  

  One thing with Hard Cider, depending on the yeast used...you can get some pretty strong sulfer smells during fermentation...these do dissipate with time




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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 June 2015 at 19:45
My first hard cider used filtered natural cider (pastuerised, no preservatives), Premiere Cuvée yeast and no added sugar. It turned out very well, crystal-clear after about 4 or 5 weeks. It was very effervescent without being over-carbonated, and got more "refreshing" as it aged.

This apfelwein seems much clearer than the photos show, but it is darker than my hard cider was; perhaps because of the dark brown sugar. It is definitely "stronger" than my hard cider was, and there is of course no carbonation. I might carbonate a few bottles of it, just to see what it is like; another option, which is popular in Germany, I guess - is to serve the apfelwein with 7-up, Sprite or some other lemon-lime soft drink. This adds effervescence and also of course brings the alcohol content down as it is consumed.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22 June 2015 at 04:38
What is the difference between hard cider and applejack? Now you've added a third contender, apple wine.


As I recall it, Tom (and don't count on my memory) it has to do with the difference in alcohol content; apple jack being the stronger of the two.

As to the other, in the U.S., according to gubmint standards, strained & pasteurized is called juice. Unmodified (that is, with pulp) is cider. As with everything else, however, the marketing types have diluted these meanings.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gonefishin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22 June 2015 at 05:24
Originally posted by HistoricFoodie HistoricFoodie wrote:

What is the difference between hard cider and applejack? Now you've added a third contender, apple wine.

 

  As I understand it, Hard Cider is fermented apple juice or cider.  Applejack is freeze distillation of the fermented cider.  This is when you freeze off your hard cider, the lesser of the alcohol/water in your apple solution freezes.  Once this portion has frozen, you skim it off, leaving the higher alcohol solution behind, you continue to do this.

   I haven't made AppleJack yet, but will probably give it a try come winter time.  Anyone else ever try it?
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Percebes Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26 July 2015 at 18:32
I have been bottling everything in sight because I feel like Fall is careening towards me at a rapid pace.

My trees are bursting with larger more abundant fruit than I have witnessed in the past.

My Hungarian Mother in law has been anxious for me to make her some more Meggybor from her Sour Cherry tree. Ready to pick now before the birds do it for me.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 September 2015 at 20:20
My apologies - I just experienced the July and August from Hell, as far as work is concerned. Things have calmed down quite a bit, and I can hopefully keep up better. 

Unfortunately, I may also have to start a new batch. My #2 son - who admittedly has a "problem" - decided to guzzle this down like cheap ThunderBird before I even had a chance to try it. This was a couple of weeks ago, after I had very, very deliberately nursed this apfelwein from beginning, through fermenting and during aging. I wasn't even going to try it until October, as it would presumably have been really hitting its stride by then. 

But now, nothing. 

I am still trying to decide whether or not to start a new batch, or use the boy as a "donor" for experimentation into blood wine.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote pitrow Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03 September 2015 at 10:04
Ugh, that sucks. All that effort for nothing. Sorry to hear that Ron. That blood wine would be pretty hard to turn away from if I were in your shoes. Wink
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Percebes Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 September 2015 at 21:20
I feel your pain Ron.
#2 son moved back home in Oct 2013 and then left to move back to Victoria BC in March 2015.
Although was great to help him out and reconnect, the true extent of the costs that have been wreaked on my cellar may never be known.

A rough guess would put the damage at about 140 bottles of wine and maybe 3-4 bottles of hard spirits.
He has been trying to make some amends by "gifting" me some wine making kits. Two so far, and I guess that is a start.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gracoman Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 September 2015 at 09:13
Years ago, when I lived back East, I was good friends with a guy who just happened to come from a wealthy family.

One Winter, the family left for a ski vacation in the mountains of Vermont.  Their 16 year old daughter didn't want to go.  Probably because she was 16.  So they left her on her own for a week.

When they returned, everything was in pristine condition with one exception.  2 cases of wine were missing. 

After a time the daughter admitted she and her friends drank those two cases of wine down to the last drop.

What she didn't know was those two cases of wine, kept in a climate controlled environment, were cases of Château Lafite Rothchild  purchased as an investment. Little Missy and her 16 year old friends had guzzled $5,000.00 worth of investment wine.

This was in the 70's. Château Lafite was considerably less expensive back then
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06 September 2015 at 01:00
Yowch ~ the loss of my 10-dollar apfelwein doesn't seem so bad, now!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 September 2015 at 20:03
I've started my new batch of apfelwein, using Montrachet yeast and white sugar. 

Results to follow!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote drinks Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13 September 2015 at 14:55
Just put a gallon in a 4 l. glass jug, 1 cup cane sugar, 1/2 package of high temperature wine yeast, lock is in place and jug is in the dark at room temperature,. last batch was sampled to death, perhaps this one will have a chance to develop.

giggle! And perhaps not, depends on the results of early samples.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote drinks Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 September 2015 at 12:24
I just costed this batch, HEB had filtered apple juice,1/2 gal. 5 x $5, so, juice, $2, sugar .35c, and yeast .30c.
I shall go broke making this stuff, ;)
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gonefishin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 30 September 2016 at 07:04
   Are you going to take a little bit and make some ice brandy this winter?  That's still something I want to do and haven't yet
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 30 September 2016 at 09:03
I really should give that a try, Dan, and this winter would be a perfect time to try it...but with so much going on, I probably will push it back...and back...and back....

I don't even want to talk about it, but the boy got into this again....
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