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Apple Cinnamon Breakfast Links

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TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
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    Posted: 07 January 2012 at 11:24
This comes from RowdyRay at www.smoked-meat.com. I'd love to give it a try sometime, and might have to see if I can procure a few of the ingredients. 
 
Quote My grandson was joking with me the last time we made sausage. He was eating apple cinnamon cheerios or something and asked if I could make a sausage like that. What's a grampa to do?

Had about 6 recipes saved I thought were good cadidates. So late New Years eve, after way too many beers, here's what we came up with.

5 lbs pork
5 tsps salt
2 tsp ground black pepper
1 tsp dried sage
1 tsp dried thyme
1/2 tsp ground cinnamon
1/4 tsp ground ginger
1 1/2 harrelson apples shredded
5 generous Tbls apple cider molasses
 
Shredded apple:
 


Used LEM's 20? mm sheep casings. Good thing I wrote down what we put into it. Couldn't hardly read my own writing. Hehe. 
 

Should have seen the look on his face when he said, "Hey.....it's apples and cinnamon."
 
 
For once, he didn't steal all the bacon. Thumb
If anyone can tell me where to get (or how to make) apple cider molasses, I'd be grateful!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 08 January 2012 at 08:54
Here's information on the apple (cider) molasses from MeatHunter:
 
Quote Apple molasses is something I came across last year on a food blog. Dates back to the Colonial days where they made it so it would last thru the year without spoilage. Would even outlast the hard cider they made. Basically what you do is boil and reduce Apple cider to 1/7 the original volume but have seen where people go as far as 1/10th. I started with 2 gallons and reduced to fit into a 750 mil wine bottle. Provided that the container you plan to store it in is clean/sterile, one can leave it out on the counter.

I went to 1/7th the original volume and it is very very thick. Like cold molasses. The taste is super intense of sweet apple.
 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Hoser Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10 January 2012 at 16:48
I made some apple cider molasses today and it came out great.

I'll be using it later in the week to glaze a pork loin roast, and probably as a sauce to serve the roast as well.
Pics will be posted as time allows.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10 January 2012 at 17:32
excellent, dave - looking forward to seeing how it went!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Daikon Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10 January 2012 at 17:54
You can actually do something like this apple molasses with most fruit juices -- and many of them go well with pork.  One of my favorites is to braise pork chops in orange juice along with plenty of rosemary and some garlic and thyme.  Once the chops are done, pull them out then put the spurs to the now-infused orange juice until it reduces to a syrupy glaze -- you haven't reduced and caramelized far enough if it hasn't turned a rich brown color instead of orange.  Return the chops to the pan to rewarm them and coat in the glaze, then they're ready to serve with a spoonful of extra sauce.

The basic technique of infusing and reducing a fruit juice is very similar to making a more classical wine reduction, but with a lighter flavor profile, typically.  You can also do some of each by first poaching fruit in wine with herbs and spices (think of your vin chaud...) and then reducing the poaching liquid into a sauce.  Treated in this manner, prunes poached with whole star anise and cinnamon stick in red wine makes an excellent side dish and a plum sauce to go with pork.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10 January 2012 at 18:31
both of those suggestions sound outstanding - i'll see about trying one next time we have pork chops. i am guessing a loin roast might be too thick?
when i was making the vin chaud, i was thinking it would make a great reduction for pears or other fruit.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Daikon Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10 January 2012 at 18:58
The loin would be perfect to roast separately while you poach the prunes.  You can also poach your fruit a day or more ahead of time without any trouble.  Reduce the poaching liquid once the roast comes out of the oven and is resting before slicing, and you'll have something similar to what I did for a week-before-Christmas dinner, but I used a rack of 8 pork ribs from my local premium butcher shop.  Brined overnight, then roasted.  Don't ask how much I paid for that rib roast -- I'm just glad that Christmas only comes around once a year!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10 January 2012 at 19:14
it sounds incredible, daikon, and i'm officially inspired. the next loin, tenderloin or chops we do, i'll give this a try as it sounds like a perfect winter dish.
i've got the basic outline figured out, but may be picking your brain a bit when it's time to do this, if you don't mind.
the orange/garlic/rosemary pork chops sound like incredible project for spring, as well.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Daikon Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10 January 2012 at 19:22
Originally posted by TasunkaWitko TasunkaWitko wrote:

 
the orange/garlic/rosemary pork chops sound like incredible project for spring, as well.
Just don't try to serve them when there are hungry kids around (http://foodsoftheworld.activeboards.net/forum_posts.asp?TID=1474&title=weeknights-at-the-tasunkawitko-house).  I made these once when my brother and his family were visiting.  His youngest daughter was less than 2 years-old at the time.  While she was sitting on his lap at the dinner table, he made the mistake of feeding her a morsel of his chop.  Which led to another.  And another.  And another.  By the time she was done and my brother was asking for another chop so that he could now have his dinner, they were all gone! LOL  They are now known as Maddie's Pork Chops.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10 January 2012 at 19:28
sounds like you did something right - when i try them, maddie's pork chops they will be!
 
thanks for sharing a great family food memory - that's one of the main things this site is about!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Hoser Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11 January 2012 at 02:20
Originally posted by Daikon Daikon wrote:

You can actually do something like this apple molasses with most fruit juices -- and many of them go well with pork.  One of my favorites is to braise pork chops in orange juice along with plenty of rosemary and some garlic and thyme.  Once the chops are done, pull them out then put the spurs to the now-infused orange juice until it reduces to a syrupy glaze -- you haven't reduced and caramelized far enough if it hasn't turned a rich brown color instead of orange.  Return the chops to the pan to rewarm them and coat in the glaze, then they're ready to serve with a spoonful of extra sauce.

The basic technique of infusing and reducing a fruit juice is very similar to making a more classical wine reduction, but with a lighter flavor profile, typically.  You can also do some of each by first poaching fruit in wine with herbs and spices (think of your vin chaud...) and then reducing the poaching liquid into a sauce.  Treated in this manner, prunes poached with whole star anise and cinnamon stick in red wine makes an excellent side dish and a plum sauce to go with pork.

Absolutely...this is a technique I use quite a bit...my other favorite lately is pomegranate molasses...just reduce a bottle of the POM juice you see at the market...also wonderful with pork, or chicken.

Here's the cider....put a gallon of it in the DO and reduced to about twelve ounces...this stuff becomes extremely thick on coolling ...you may no want to reduce it as much as I did.



Total reduction time was about 4 hours.
 


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11 January 2012 at 15:45
looks great, dave - i'll be looking forward to giving that a shot ~ would you guess that by the time it is reduced like that, either apple cidere or apple juice would work just as well as the other?
 
daikon - thanks for a great run-down on maddie's pork chops! assuming the procedure itself is similar for the poached prunes in reduced wine, what ingredients list would you recommend? i plan on trying both with thick (maybe 3/4- or 1-inch) pork chops or, possibly, pork loin roast.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Daikon Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11 January 2012 at 16:37
Originally posted by TasunkaWitko TasunkaWitko wrote:

 assuming the procedure itself is similar for the poached prunes in reduced wine, what ingredients list would you recommend? i plan on trying both with thick (maybe 3/4- or 1-inch) pork chops or, possibly, pork loin roast.
Yes and no.  You can't really braise the meat and poach the fruit at the same time -- the fruit is much more delicate, and would disintegrate if left to simmer with the meat throughout the braise.  I've only ever done the poached prunes as a side for meat that has been dry roasted separately.  In that case, I use Thomas Keller's recommendation as a starting point: 2 cups dry red wine, 2 star anise, 1 cinnamon stick, 1/4 cup honey, 1 lb. prunes -- all into a covered pot and refrigerated overnight.  Next day, bring it all up to a simmer, stirring occasionally.  Take it off the heat and let the prunes cool in the liquid.  Transfer it all into a sealed container and refrigerate -- it'll keep as long as two weeks (except that it never does, because everybody eats them!  Poached prunes with corn flakes, anyone?)

I suppose you could strain off and use the poaching liquid for all or part of the braising liquid at that point, but I've never done more than reduce it into an excellent plum sauce to be served with the roast. 

You might even try both at once.  I'm envisioning a roast or braised loin or tenderloin, sliced and arranged down the center of a platter with rosemary/orange reduction pooled on one side of the platter --garnished with orange slices and rosemary sprigs, plum sauce and prunes on the other side.  Ooooo... better yet, arrange the sliced meat alternating with thin orange slices, then a row of prunes on top right down the center; one sauce each side and some rosemary sprigs on the orange side.  Very pretty! A little extra of each sauce available separately, and you're good to go. 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 January 2012 at 12:15
good grief, that sounds good ~ i believe i may give one (or both, as you mention) of these a try as my inaugural project with the tramontina i'll be ordering tomorrow, preparing the sauces ahead of time and doing the loin roast (or perhaps 2 tenderloins, one for each sauce?) in the dutch oven.
 
speaking of the tramontina, i am assuming that it would be good for "marinating" the prunes overnight, then simmering and reducing the next day - any chance of staining the procelain and, if so, any suggestions for removing the possible stain?
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Daikon Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 January 2012 at 23:20
Yeah, you could stain it, and that pot is way bigger than you need to do the prunes.  A 1 or 2 quart pot is fine for the poaching -- although you'd want to do the reduction in something with more evaporative surface area.
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