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"Baked slaugh?"

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Karl View Drop Down
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    Posted: 26 June 2014 at 16:42
From the diary of a young St. Louis lady traveling to Kentucky by riverboat in 1868, we glen much information about this mode of travel and meals that were served her as she went visiting. She gives the complete menu of one such meal in the home of friends at what she described as "a very nice looking table. Beans & Bacon, Duck and dressing, mashed Irish potatoes, baked slaugh my favorite dish, sweet potatoes baked and boiled with gravy, dried corn cooked, the sweetest I ever tasted, fried ham, nice egg bread and butter, sweet peach pickle & cucumber sour pickle, Jelly, tomatoes, after these dishes had been served, the plates were removed and we were helped to pie, green apple and cheery, the best I have ever eaten for a long time..."

I cannot seem to find a "baked slaugh" recipe let alone one that I can be reasonably sure is close to what she wrote about.  Any suggestions?   It sounds like most riverboats fed you pretty well. 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Hoser Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27 June 2014 at 01:58
No clue Karl....I've checked all my resources, and no mention of slaugh being anything other than a spirit of Scottish lore...a fairy of sorts.

The young lady must have been using a colloquialism of the time and area?
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27 June 2014 at 04:39
People were pretty liberal with their spelling back then - read the Lewis and Clark Journals, and you will see what I mean.

I wonder if it isn't an alternate spelling for "slaw," as in cabbage or coleslaw?
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Karl View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Karl Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27 June 2014 at 11:09
I am guessing that by slaugh she meant slaw.  I am guessing that by slaw she meant cabbage.  I have found shredded cabbage casserole recipes like:  http://www.yummly.com/recipe/Scalloped-Cabbage-Casserole-TasteOfHome?columns=4&position=3%2F47  Reconstructing the recipe this way feels like FAXing a picture to yourself way too many time though.  For all I know this might have been the first time that she ate cauliflower and didn't know what else to call it.... 

The history of coleslaw does not mention a baked version:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coleslaw  On an aside, I like cabbage but never got the coleslaw joke until my wife took me to a Lexington BBQ shack. 

I realize that we have lost a lot of recipes over time but her comment that this was her favorite dish in what sounds like a good spread caught my attention. 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Karl Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27 June 2014 at 11:15
The Scotts did bring us foods like haggis so maybe they did bake fairies into pies?  Wink


As likely as my cheesy cabbage casserole recipe being what she liked(?) 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote Margi Cintrano Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 June 2014 at 15:23


Author Lettice Bryan, of the 1839 cookbook called THE KENTUCKY HOUSE WIFE, on website: www.civilwartalk.com

STATES: Cold slaugh = cabbage salad, cold

Interesting, as it was in 1861, when the salad had started to become called SLAW in its form, as most of have it, match book stick strips.



Hope this is of some help.




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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Karl Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 30 June 2014 at 10:48
Originally posted by Margi Cintrano Margi Cintrano wrote:



Author Lettice Bryan, of the 1839 cookbook called THE KENTUCKY HOUSE WIFE, on website: www.civilwartalk.com

STATES: Cold slaugh = cabbage salad, cold

Interesting, as it was in 1861, when the salad had started to become called SLAW in its form, as most of have it, match book stick strips.



Hope this is of some help.






Thank you.  Yes, that helps by documenting the spelling. 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Melissa Mead Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 July 2014 at 15:57
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Margi Cintrano Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 July 2014 at 17:16
Thank you Melissa. Very helpful. Have a lovely summer.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Karl Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27 August 2014 at 13:48
Here is Lettice Bryan’s original recipe for both Cold and Warm Slaugh, which is not much improved upon by any of the later versions or any additional ingredients:

COLD SLAUGH
1 head cabbage
Vinegar
Salt
Pepper
Whole mustard seeds, white
Pickled eggs

Select firm, fragile heads of cabbage (no other sort being fit for slaugh); having stripped off the outer leaves, cleave the top part of the head into four equal parts, leaving the lower part whole, so that they may not be separated till shaved or cut fine from the stalk. Take a very sharp knife, shave off the cabbage round-wise, cutting it very smoothly and evenly, and at no rate more than a quarter of an inch in width. Put the shavings or slaugh in a deep china dish, pile it high, and make it smooth; mix with enough good vinegar to nearly fill the dish, a sufficient quantity of salt and pepper to season the slaugh; add a spoonful of whole white mustard seeds, and pour it over the slaugh, garnish it round on the edge of the dish with pickled eggs, cut in ringlets. Never put butter on cabbage that is to be eaten cold, as it is by no means pleasant to the taste or sight.

‘WARM SLAUGH’
Cut them (cabbage) as for Cold Slaugh; having put in the skillet enough butter, salt, pepper and vinegar to season the slaugh very well. Put into it the seasonings stirring very fast so that it all may warm equally. And as soon as it gets hot, serve it in a deep china dish. Make it smooth and disseminate it over the yolks of hard boiled eggs that are minced fine.
 
Thank you.  getting closer to the "baked slaugh."  
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 September 2014 at 13:16
I'm liking the looks of that - much better-looking than "slaws" with sugar and/mayonnaise - in my opinion.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Melissa Mead Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13 December 2014 at 12:41
I found a recipe for "hot slaugh" in this book: http://www.amazon.com/Hear-America-Cooking-Betty-Fussell/dp/0670812412

Not sure if it's the same thing as baked slaugh, but the book is interesting.
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