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BEEF STROGANOFF

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got14u View Drop Down
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    Posted: 28 January 2010 at 10:59
This is one of my families favorite. I'm not sure how authentic it is...but boy is it good ! Pics below
Beef Stroganoff
  • 2 pounds sirloin steak, cut into bite size strips
  • 2 medium onions, chopped
  • 3 tablespoons all-purpose flour
  • 1-1/2 teaspoons salt (more if kosher salt)
  • 1 teaspoon paprika
  • Sliced mushrooms (if not using soup)
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper
  • 1 (10.75 ounce) can condensed cream of mushroom soup
  • 3 cups fat free sour cream
  • 1 cup heavy cream or half and half (optional)
  • 2 (8 ounce) packages egg noodles
  • Wine to deglaze pan

DIRECTIONS

This recipe's Ingredients were scaled to yield a new amount. The directions below still refer to the original recipe yield of 4 servings.

1.       Brown the beef strips in a large skillet over medium high heat and drain excess fat. Add the onion and saute for 5 minutes, or until tender(deglaze). Stir in the flour, salt, paprika and ground black pepper.

2.       Add the soup, reduce heat to medium low and let simmer for 15 minutes. Then add the sour cream, stirring well.

3.       Prepare egg noodles according to package directions. Serve beef mixture over the egg noodles.



Edited by got14u - 29 January 2010 at 20:29
Jerod

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 January 2010 at 11:31

Beef stroganoff is a wonderful stick-to-the-ribs meal that just keeps getting better and better each time you make it. Thanks for sharing your wonderful recipe, it's certainly that time of year to have supper's like this!

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got14u View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote got14u Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29 January 2010 at 20:28
Ok we went ahead and made some to night and I do a little different then the recipe. I like to put in a little can of green chiles and I also like to make it with out mushroom soup. But tonight I didn't have any fresh mushrooms so I wasn't able to do that. I do add some milk or half and half to mine to thin it out. Here are some pics of the product. It was great and definitely one of the family favs. Oh I also cover and simer a little to tenderize the meat.
browned sliced up beef chuck roast and sweated onions
finished and on a bed of noodles
 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Margi Cintrano Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 23 September 2012 at 11:27
*** Prior to adorning on bed of egg noodles, or sauce-ing; the one in the black skillet: 
is prepared with veal, however, we prefer the beef shown in the blue and white ceramic ware and use the Tri Tip Roast equivalent here in Spain.
 
Ciao Jerod,
 
Your Beef Stroganoff looks very lovely. Thanks for posting your contribution.
 
I prepare our´s with wild mushrooms as they shall be in season in October, White Vermouth, sliced shallot, beef stock & Hungarian Paprika to give it the deep brick red tone, and crème fraîche or heavy cream, as it is  hard to purchase sour cream here in the Mediterranean.
 
Ciao,
Marge.
 
 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote AK1 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 23 September 2012 at 19:24
Wow! There's a dish I haven't made in quite a while. I definitely think I'll have to remedy that soon.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Margi Cintrano Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 24 September 2012 at 03:22
AK1, Good Morning,
 
Which beef cut do you prepare your´s with ?
 
Are there any additions to your recipe and / or subs ?
 
I use White Vermouth, crème fraîche ( sour cream hard to obtain in Mediterranean ) or cream and  shallots and Paprika of course. Mushrooms: I prefer the forest types, such as Boletus Eduli or Black Trumphets verses white mushroom domestic variety or chanterelles.  
 
Have great day,
M.C.
 
 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote AK1 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 September 2013 at 22:39
I'm making this for dinner tonight. My son requested it.

In doing some research to try and make the most authentic version, I've discovered that there really is no "authentic" version. Here's some info;

The recipe has its origin from Russia.Despite the name "stroganoff" associated to Count Paul Stroganoff, a 19th century Russian diplomat, the origins of the dish have never been confirmed.

This original recipe had beef, mushrooms and sour cream.

Elena Molokhovets' classic Russian cookbook (1861) gives the first known recipe for Govjadina po-strogonovski, s gorchitseju "Beef Stroganov with mustard" which involves lightly floured beef cubes (not strips) sautéed, sauced with prepared mustard and bouillon (a broth. This name comes from the verb bouillir, meaning to boil), and finished with a small amount of sour cream and no onion

An excerpt from The Cuisine of Hungary, George Lang [Atheneum:New York] 1982 (p. 272) indicates that this dish dates quite back into the history-

"One of the most interesting versions of tokany is the ancient dish of sour cream vetrece (savanyu vetrece), which was already mentioned as a part of the dinners of King Matthias in the fifteenth century. In this type of ragout, beef is cooked with smoked bacon, garlic and black pepper; later bay leaves, mustard, lemon juice, vinegar, sugar and grated lemon rind are added, and finally sour cream. The only flavors lost over the centuries are mace, ginger and saffron. In the dining rooms of the Transylvanian gentry, paper-thin slices of peeled lemon were served on top of this more sweet than sour dish and does not specify a starch accompaniment."

A 1912 recipe adds onions and tomato paste tomato paste and serves it with crisp potato.Tomato paste is a thick paste made from ripened tomatoes with skin and seeds removed. Depending on its manufacturing conditions, it can be used to make either ketchup or reconstituted tomato juice. 

With substantial variation in the ways of cooking and taste this Beef Stroganoff recipe has evolved into different versions and is thus much popular in its different forms in Europe, Australia, North America, South Africa and Brazil.

It is popular in Portugal and Brazil under the name "estrogonofe" or "Strogonoff.

Stroganoff is also popular in Sweden and Norway. In Sweden, a common variant is sausage stroganoff, which uses the domestic product Falukorv(a traditional Sweden sausage.) as a substitute for the beef. Beef stroganoff is however also a common dish. 

 
 
 
 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 September 2013 at 23:01
So, that said, which version have you decided on?
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote AK1 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 September 2013 at 00:07
I'll let you know.!! All I know for sure is that it will have beef in itTongue
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