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Beet Tzatziki

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HistoricFoodie View Drop Down
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    Posted: 13 July 2013 at 19:48
Tzatziki, a classic Green dish, is made with cucumbers. Ana Sortun, chef and owner of Oleana, in Boston, makes a variation using beets.

Red, golden, or Chiogga (candy striped) beets can be used. I had planned on using goldens, but there were some nice looking Chiogga's at the market, so went with them.

I did make some modifications to the recipe. For instance, I had no idea that grated beets contained so much moisture, and had to squeeze it out just as with cukes. She doesn't mention that. And I felt a cup and a half of yogurt was too much for the amount of grated beets, so cut it back to one cup.

Here is the recipe as I made it.

1 cup cooked (roasting is better than boiling, btw) beets.
Olive oil
Salt and pepper to taste
2 plump garlic cloves, minced
1 tsp salt
2 tsp freshly squeezed lemon juice (about a half lemon)
1 cup yogurt, Greek style preferred
1 tbls extra virgin olive oil
Black pepper to taste
1 tbls chopped fresh dill

Grate the beets (about one large) in the large openings of a box grater to make one cup. Drain and squeeze out the moisture as necessary.

In a bowl combine the garlic, salt, and lemon juice. Let sit for about ten minutes. Stir in the yogurt, olive oil, and black pepper until well blended.

Fold in the beets and dill and adjust seasoning.

Can be served cold or at room temperature.


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13 July 2013 at 19:52
For those who don't know how, here's how to roast beets.

Trim the root end. Rub the beat with olive or vegetable oil, sprinkle with salt and pepper, and wrap in foil. Set the wrapped beats on a sheet pan or something similar.

Roast in a 400F oven until tender, 45-60 minutes depending on size. Remove from oven and let cool to the point you can handle them. Open the foil and peel the beets. The hotter they are the easier this is to do.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Margi Cintrano Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14 July 2013 at 01:32
Brook.

Fabulous and so simple. I always roast ( oven ) my beets. I cannot wait to prepare the récipe. Thank you for re-editing the récipe.

I have authentic Greek Yogurt, which shall be wonderful, an exported Brand called: Eridanous

Thanks again and have lovely weekend.

Margi.
Volamos a Mediterraneo, un paraiso que conquista su gente u su cocina.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Effigy Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14 July 2013 at 01:32
Dab of balsamic in that package. My 2c worth.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14 July 2013 at 05:43
Might make it too sweet, Anne. But worth a try. Doesn't need more acid, though, because of the lemon juice.

This was the first time I made it, so followed the recipe fairly closely. I've always been impressed with Ana Sortun's creative approach to the foods of the eastern Med, so do it her way first. Then modify as I feel fit.

If I have any issues with her it's her use of names. She often takes a standard dish, makes it with radically different ingredients, but continues using the original name. Beet Tzatziki is one example. She also has an "Avocado hummus." Etc.

At what point does this same-naming contribute to the overall dumbing down that we've seen as it applies to foodstuffs? I dunno. But I do feel it isn't a long journey from Beet Tzatiziki to "sauté in a little juice...."

Here endeth the sermon.

I do have a few follow-up questions in my mind. Is it just the chioggas? Or do all beets get liquidy when grated? I've never grated them before, so have no feel for this. I also eschewed red beets. Ana says they are too intense. Mebbe so. Me, I was more concerned with the possibility of them running, and turning the whole dish pink. But maybe once they're grated and wrung-out that wouldn't happen.

All in all, a simple recipe that leaves lots of room for experimentation.



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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Melissa Mead Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14 July 2013 at 07:54
I didn't know about wrapping beets in foil before roasting them. Thanks for pointing that out.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Margi Cintrano Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 July 2013 at 02:27
Melissa,

Hope you are having lovely summer.

I have been roasting beetroots, since time memorial ... just like a baked potato Jack ... Same method. They are wonderful. Give it a try.

Have lovely summer,
Margaux.
Volamos a Mediterraneo, un paraiso que conquista su gente u su cocina.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Effigy Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 July 2013 at 04:04
Originally posted by HistoricFoodie HistoricFoodie wrote:

Might make it too sweet, Anne. But worth a try. Doesn't need more acid, though, because of the lemon juice.
I was referring to the foil packages.
Originally posted by HistoricFoodie HistoricFoodie wrote:

For those who don't know how, here's how to roast beets.
Trim the root end. Rub the beat with olive or vegetable oil, sprinkle with salt and pepper, and wrap in foil. Set the wrapped beats on a sheet pan or something similar.

Roast in a 400F oven until tender, 45-60 minutes depending on size. Remove from oven and let cool to the point you can handle them. Open the foil and peel the beets. The hotter they are the easier this is to do. 

The Greek recipe is too new to me to dare to suggest alterationsWink
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 July 2013 at 06:37
I was referring to the foil packages.

Ah ha. That would work.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote africanmeat Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 July 2013 at 07:01
This sound like a great idea i will do it this week . i wonder if it will go with a lamb?
thanks . 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 July 2013 at 09:24
Looks good, Brook -
 
Ann, I am guessing that it would indeed go very well with lamb, both in taste and in appearance. Would be interesting to see!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Effigy Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 July 2013 at 14:15
Noooo! the lambs are only babies not even a week old.Evil Smile
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Margi Cintrano Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 August 2013 at 14:22
Anne.


This is the way they are roasted in Castilla y León ... Fantastic ... The Mediterranean does have its ancient culture in tact .. It is highly protected by the Spanish Government. Each región with its own dishes just like Italia and Greee and France.

Wonderful.

August is our summer holidays and off I go to visit my Mom and then, off to Italia, where we we have my Mom in Law and my younger twin daughter visiting ...

Margaux.
Volamos a Mediterraneo, un paraiso que conquista su gente u su cocina.
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