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Biersuppe

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Karl View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Karl Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26 September 2017 at 23:18
http://www.cookiemold.com/CookieMolds-History.html  
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TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27 September 2017 at 08:21
Karl -

This is a pretty cool link; thanks for sharing!

I am going to copy/paste it over to the "Tools of the Trade" section, where hopefully an interesting discussion will take off....   
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Karl View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Karl Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27 September 2017 at 15:48
Originally posted by TasunkaWitko TasunkaWitko wrote:

Karl -

This is a pretty cool link; thanks for sharing!

I am going to copy/paste it over to the "Tools of the Trade" section, where hopefully an interesting discussion will take off....   


I am slowly but surely expanding on the spiced cake possibilities in the wedding feast menu.   Some folks who moved away from sunny Juneau to Washington state are at least looking into recreating that fest for an SCA event.  Maybe they will let know how it goes someday. 



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TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27 September 2017 at 16:07
Karl - should we start a new thread for Medieval Spiced Cakes?

I imagine that they would span many regions, so perhaps in the "Breads, Grains and Baking" Forum?

Let me know!

Ron
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pitrow View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote pitrow Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 September 2017 at 08:57
it's funny that this thread should pop back up. Just the other day I came across a Dutch recipe for 'bierpap' or beer porridge, that's served for dinner. I'm curious to try it alongside the biersuppe to see how they differ and if the results of the pap will be the same underwhelming results the biersuppe gave.  
Mike
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 08 May 2019 at 14:06
As can be seen above,, I agonized quite a bit over which beer to use when I made Biersuppe; this overview of German beers, From Time/Life's Foods of the World - The Cooking of Germany (1969) contains a few inaccuracies, but in general helps to point one in the right direction:

Quote The Many Faces of German Beer

As an accompaniment to dining out, and as a pastime in itself, beer-drinking is one of Germany's oldest and best-known customs, involving a consumption of some 2 billion gallons a year. Generally distinguished as dark or light, German beers also come in sweet and bitter, weak and strong, top- and bottom-fermented varieties (depending on the type of yeast, which floats or sinks during the brewing). Among the bottom-fermented beers is Lager (meaning "to store", which is aged about six weeks to clear and mellow it. Export is a stronger beer, stored about two to three months so it will not cloud up during shipment. Another is the bitterish Pilsener, originally brewed in Pilsen, Czechoslovakia. Pilsener and other light beers are often served with Schnaps. The dark, strong and seductive Bock is brewed in winter and consumed in spring. Märzenbier, with a colour between light and dark, is served at the Oktoberfest in Munich.

Top-fermented beers are cloudy as a result of after-fermentation in the bottle. Among them is the weak, frothy Weissbier or "white beer," which in Munich is served with a lemon slice. The delicate, Champagne-like Berliner Weisse lovingly nicknamed "cook blonde" by Berliners, is brewed entirely from wheat and is customarily served mit Schuss ("with a shot of syrup") Other top-fermented beers include the light Altbier ("old beer"), derived from a Renish favourite called Kölsch, and the sweet, dark Malzbier favoured by women and children because it is nutritious but very low in alcohol.
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