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B端ndnerfleisch

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TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
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    Posted: 12 May 2010 at 16:51
From Wiki -
 
Quote B端ndnerfleisch, also known as Bindenfleisch or Viande des Grisons, is an air-dried meat that is produced in the canton of Graub端nden, Switzerland.
 
The main ingredient is beef, taken from the animals upper thigh or shoulder, the fat and the sinews being removed. Before drying, the meat is treated with white wine and seasonings such as salt, onion and assorted herbs. The initial drying process, lasting 3 5 weeks, takes place in sealed containers stored at a temperature close to freezing point. The meat is regularly rearranged during this stage, in order to ensure that the salt and seasonings will be evenly distributed and absorbed. During a second drying phase the meat is then hung in free flowing air at a temperature of between 9 and 14 degrees Celsius. It is also periodically pressed in order to separate out residual moisture: from this pressing B端ndnerfleisch acquires its characteristic rectangular shape. Traditionally B端ndnerfleisch was not a smoked meat.
 
The extent of water loss during the salting and drying processes, whereby the product loses approximately half of its initial weight, is sufficient to confer excellent keeping qualities and a high nutritional value, without the need for any additional preservatives.
B端ndnerfleisch is served with bread, sliced very thinly. It can also be served in soup, cut into strips or little cubes.
 
B端ndnerfleisch appears to be related to the dried meat product from the Besan巽on region of France known as 'br辿si'. It is also very similar to Bresaola, which is produced in the neighbouring Italian province of Valtellina; unlike B端ndnerfleisch, bresaola is not pressed, though.
 
this looks like something along the lines of italian prosciutto, spanish serrano ham, south african bilton, romanian pastrama etc. i'd definitely like to give this a try with venison if anyone can find a recipe.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Hoser Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13 May 2010 at 02:34
That's a new one on me...I wonder if it's listed in the book "Charcuterie"? I know they cover most preservation tecniques well, unfortunately I do not own a copy.
Well, I did alittle googling, and I have to tell you...this stuff looks awesome! we need a recipe!
Go ahead...play with your food!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Boilermaker Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11 December 2010 at 20:35
Anyone come up with anything on this?  Would love to give it a try if I had a recipe.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Hoser Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 December 2010 at 03:31
I haven't seen any more on it Andy...it sure looks great though...doesn't it? Kind of like a prosciutto made of beef.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 December 2010 at 08:25
my research has pointed to a lot on how it is made in terms of the process, and also some of the ingredients, but i can't find much on the actual "recipe." will keep looking, tho!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Hoser Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 March 2011 at 04:16
I found a place right here in little Rhody that makes Bresaola..which is the same as Bundnerfliesch, but made on the Italian side of the Alps.

Daniele Inc makes all kinds of Italian meats and sausages..one of the biggest suppliers in the USA, and it is about 20 minutes from my house, in the town of Glocester.

They sell on Amazon and it is around $42.00 for a two pound unsliced block.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03 January 2012 at 15:12
Originally posted by Boilermaker Boilermaker wrote:

Anyone come up with anything on this?  Would love to give it a try if I had a recipe.
 
andy - from what i can see, it looks like the basic method for pastram:
 
 
or dried beef:
 
 
can put you in the neighbourhood. from there, it's just a matter of coming up with a combination of flavours and spices that you want in order to achieve the result.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Percebes Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 24 October 2014 at 05:58
I have a recipe from my good friend and mentor Klaus Wockinger.
It is from his book
Game
The art of preparation and cooking of game and game fowl
N and C Publishing 1988

Smoked Venison
2 kg (4 lbs) venison or elk meat from inside (top)- outside (bottom)round or round.
2 Tbsp salt
1 Tbsp cure- Ultra- Cure 200-Nitrate for extended dry curing
2 tsp raw sugar
2 tsp white pepper ground
10 juniper berries crushed

Remove silver skin and all ligaments. Mix salt, cure, sugar, pepper and juniper berries.
Rub meat well on all sides with the spice mixture and pack tight in a clean container (not metal)
Sprinkle left over spices over the meat. 9 Make sure to use all the salt mixture.)
Cover with a wooden lid or a dinner plate and place for one week in the refrigerator, turning meat every second day.


Rinse meat with cold water and hang to dry for at least one day in a cool place. Dust with pepper and smoke cold. (Not over 20C (70F).Meat should be hung in a cool place to dry for at least 4 weeks. Smoked venison will keep for months in a cool room.


Cut meat paper thin, with a meat slicer and serve on buttered rye bread or with melon, apple, papaya, fruit or salad.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Percebes Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27 November 2014 at 10:07
Making a Rosemary Beef Bresaola
Has been curing for 2 weeks- Rinsed and dried- 8 hour cold smoke with Oak .
Then a second finishing cure-Cry-0-vac and back in fridge for a 2 week cure-Then will be hung to dry for 6-7 weeks

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote AK1 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27 November 2014 at 12:54
I'd come over in 6-8 weeks to help you eat it, but it's friggin cold in Calgary.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27 November 2014 at 16:25
Whereas Ontario is in the tropics.
But we hae meat and we can eat
And sae the Lord be thanket
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Percebes Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27 November 2014 at 18:09
Originally posted by HistoricFoodie HistoricFoodie wrote:

Whereas Ontario is in the tropics.

Almost. The Southern most point in Ontario is South of Northern California.
Calgary will enjoy -20C low temps tomorrow and I always have a case or 2 of Ginger Beer chilling for unexpected visitors
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote AK1 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 November 2014 at 12:14
Originally posted by HistoricFoodie HistoricFoodie wrote:

Whereas Ontario is in the tropics.
Compared to Calgary, it is. It least the Niagara Penninsula where I live.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote BriCan Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03 January 2015 at 03:28

Interesting subject  . I was shown/taught by my late German friend on how his mother taught him to make B端ndnerfleisch, as a lad inn the Black Forest area I also make the Italian style Bresaola of which I have four on the go since the beginning of November which are only at a 20% weight loss .  so there is a way to go before I hit the 40% mark 

But what do I know
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Percebes Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 January 2015 at 10:57
Rosemary Beef Bresaola is ready


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote AK1 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 January 2015 at 16:33
Looks great!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 January 2015 at 18:09
Beautiful, Murray! I imagine that sits wonderfully on the tongue!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote AK1 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29 January 2015 at 11:21
What the big difference is that Bundnerfleisch is pressed & Bresaola isn't along with probably differences in seasoning.
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