Foods of the World Forum Homepage
Forum Home Forum Home > Other Food-Related Topics > Curing of Meats, Charcuterie and Smokehouse Specialties
  New Posts New Posts RSS Feed - Bockwurst
  FAQ FAQ  Forum Search   Events   Register Register  Login Login

This site is completely supported by donations; there are no corporate sponsors. We would be honoured if you would consider a small donation, to be used exclusively for forum expenses.



Thank you, from the Foods of the World Forums!

Bockwurst

 Post Reply Post Reply
Author
Message
TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar

Joined: 25 January 2010
Location: Chinook, MT
Status: Offline
Points: 9296
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: Bockwurst
    Posted: 06 November 2012 at 15:34
I have no idea what the source is for this; it is from a book of traditional sausage recipes that I got from Todd (MeatHunter), so perhaps he can provide bibliographic information sometime.
 
 
[EDIT - I found out later that credit for this recipe goes to Rytek Kutas.]
If you are a visitor and like what you see, please click here and join the discussions in our community!
Back to Top
Sponsored Links


Back to Top
DIYASUB View Drop Down
Cook
Cook
Avatar

Joined: 01 May 2010
Status: Offline
Points: 180
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote DIYASUB Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 September 2014 at 06:50
Sorry for the late reply, I dont know how I missed this post.

If you can find Bockwurst it's well worth a try. It'll look like a white hot dog with tiny green flecks of parsley.
I dont know how the German folk cook their Bockwurst, I cook mine out on the grill the same as hot dogs. Being that Bockwurst is stuffed into a natural casing it splits, the casing turns dark brown, but the meat inside stays white. Eat it from a plate as is done with many kinds of sausage, it'll be great, but I prefer to put them on a roll as I would a hot dog.

Back to Top
HistoricFoodie View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group


Joined: 21 February 2012
Location: Kentucky
Status: Offline
Points: 4796
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 September 2014 at 07:10
Bockwurst is, essentially, a veal sausage---which is why they look white.

Given todays prices, it would also be one of the most expensive home-made sausages you can do.
But we hae meat and we can eat
And sae the Lord be thanket
Back to Top
pitrow View Drop Down
Master Chef
Master Chef
Avatar

Joined: 22 November 2010
Location: Newberg, Oregon
Status: Offline
Points: 1010
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote pitrow Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 September 2014 at 11:00
Originally posted by HistoricFoodie HistoricFoodie wrote:

Bockwurst is, essentially, a veal sausage---which is why they look white.

Given todays prices, it would also be one of the most expensive home-made sausages you can do.


Originally posted by DIYASUB DIYASUB wrote:


I dont know how the German folk cook their Bockwurst, I cook mine out on the grill the same as hot dogs. Being that Bockwurst is stuffed into a natural casing it splits, the casing turns dark brown, but the meat inside stays white. Eat it from a plate as is done with many kinds of sausage, it'll be great, but I prefer to put them on a roll as I would a hot dog.


Sounds pretty similar to weisswurst, also made of veil and as the name implies, white. Not sure that I've ever had bockwurst but the weisswurst I've had is usually poached so that it stays a nice white color. typically it's just served on a plate with various kinds of mustards. It's traditionally served as a mid-morning snack interestingly enough.
Mike
Life in PitRow - My often neglected, somewhat eccentric, occasionally outstanding blog
Back to Top
AK1 View Drop Down
Master Chef
Master Chef
Avatar

Joined: 10 April 2012
Location: Ontario, Canada
Status: Offline
Points: 1081
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote AK1 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 September 2014 at 15:42
Weisswurst & Bockwurst are quite different. There are some similarities, but they are quite different.
Back to Top
pitrow View Drop Down
Master Chef
Master Chef
Avatar

Joined: 22 November 2010
Location: Newberg, Oregon
Status: Offline
Points: 1010
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote pitrow Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 25 January 2016 at 16:45
Originally posted by AK1 AK1 wrote:

Weisswurst & Bockwurst are quite different. There are some similarities, but they are quite different.


Can you elaborate on that a little? I've been doing some looking around at different recipes, but other than the quantities of spices involved it seems that they're almost identical.  At least from what I can find online, which admittedly is hardly an "authentic" source to go by.
Mike
Life in PitRow - My often neglected, somewhat eccentric, occasionally outstanding blog
Back to Top
pitrow View Drop Down
Master Chef
Master Chef
Avatar

Joined: 22 November 2010
Location: Newberg, Oregon
Status: Offline
Points: 1010
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote pitrow Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26 January 2016 at 16:37
From Wikipedia, seems I may have found the source of my confusion. Bold emphasis added by me.

Quote Bockwurst is a German sausage which was first mentioned 1827 in Bavaria.[1] Nevertheless, an "urban legend" in Berlin claims that it was invented in 1889 by restaurant owner R. Scholtz of Berlin.[2] It is one of the most popular varieties within Germany, and can be found abroad. The sausage is traditionally made from ground veal and pork (tending more towards veal, unlike bratwurst). Bockwurst is flavored with salt, white pepper and paprika. Other herbs, such as chives and parsley, are often also added and, in Germany, bockwurst is often smoked as well. Bockwurst was originally eaten with bock beer and it is usually served with mustard. A natural casing sausage, it is usually cooked by simmering although it may also be grilled. Boiling should be avoided as the casing may split open and the Bockwurst may look unappetizing and lose flavor to the cooking water.

Bockwurst made in America, also from veal and pork, bears more resemblance to the Bavarian Weisswurst in color and taste, albeit parsley is rarely used in this version.


No wonder I'm having such difficulty coming up with a difference. Even Kutas' recipe above seems to be the Americanized/Weisswurst version of it. I'll have to do some more digging to find an authentic version it seems.
Mike
Life in PitRow - My often neglected, somewhat eccentric, occasionally outstanding blog
Back to Top
 Post Reply Post Reply
  Share Topic   

Forum Jump Forum Permissions View Drop Down



This page was generated in 0.094 seconds.