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Brazilian & Portuguese Feijoada

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Margi Cintrano View Drop Down
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    Posted: 17 February 2012 at 11:38
Firstly, the origins of Feijoada ( pronounced:  Fei joe ah dah ) date back to the 1500s with the introduction of slave traders and African slavery in Brazil. Slaves picked cotton,  worked in cocoa production and rubber manufacturing, during the gold rush they panned the metal, and the extraction of diamonds. The culinary culture of Brazil ( I was there in 2011 ) has been a merger between the colonial countries of north western Europe, the Indigenious Indians of the Amazon, North Americans, Asians and Africans. The Africans had the bean part down, the Portuguese the meats and sausages and the Amazonians, the Manioc or Cassava, known as Yuca, a common African and South American Tuber.
 
Luis Da Cámara Cascudo, a well known Brazilian historian, has stated that feijoada is a Brazilian stew which stems from the French Cassoulet, the Spanish Cocido, the Portuguese Cozido and the Italian Cssola. This National Dish of Brazil is also eaten and enjoyed throughout Portugal. 
 
In the Portuguese regions of Estremadura and Trás os Montes, the earliest printed recipes date back to the 1800s. In northwest Portugal, the white bean is more common and in the norteast, the Pinto or the Red bean is used. In Brazil, the black turtle bean is more favored.
 
FEIJOADA  for 6:
 
1 kilo of black turtle beans called Alubias soaked overnight
1/4 kilo pig ears chopped ( optional )
3 pork ribs
100 grams of filet mignon of pork
1 pig´s tail ( optional )
6 Iberian or Portuguese or Italian sausages piquant
6 Iberian or Portuguese or Italian sausages sweet
1/4 calf´s tongue
1 chunk of Canadian bacon or pancetta
*** choose from: collard greens: swiss chard, kale, cabbage, dinosaur cabbage
long grain rice white
1 green plantain fried per person
salt and pepper
*** IF POSSIBLE TO GET: CARNE SECA, a dried meat product from Brazil or Portugal
1 large pork lion shoulder
onion, yuca, garlic
Avocado Oil ( for garnish at end only - no boiling point ) and Spanish Olive Extra Virgin
 
1) Put all the pork meats in a large Dutch oven preferably made of copper as they do in Brazil and Portugal or earthenware clay ( terracotta ) and cook for 2 1/2 hours
2) Once the beans have soaked overnight, in water and salt; rinse and put with just enough water to cover and salt, and the meats ( except sausages ) in number one.
3) Taste test to insure the beans tenderness
4) and simmer for 3 hours if necessary
5) after 2 1/2 hrs., add the sausages and cook until tender
6) Now prepare the chopped bacon or pancetta, a shot of Jerez Brandy, a glass of fresh orange juice, a glass of black beer, chopped onion, chopped yuca, chopped potato, chopped garlic, Aguardiente Cachaca Brazilian fire water ( orujo ), can substitute Tequila or Grappa ...
7) Simmer to boil on low to medium flame and prepare rice in separate pot.
8) the last secret is, take 10 tablespoons of beans, and mash them, and put back in the big pot
and the results: thickens the Cozido
9) serve with triple orange slices, lime slices, lemon slices
10) serve with veggies ( boil until tender, drain and salt and pepper )
11) each dish is served in a covered pot, and ladle each in bowl, beginning with the beans and the meats with a little rice, and fruit on side
 
*** note: one can use turnips, potato, yuca, malanga, ñame and 1 type of collards ... this dish is served in Two Courses. The soup and the beans together and then, add the some of the meat. Then a plate for the veggies, rice and fruit.
 
 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 February 2012 at 11:51
an interesting-looking recipe, margi - thanks for posting ~ some ingredients, such as pig ears and tail, and calf's tongue, are a little hard to get, but i am certain that they contribute so much to the uniqe profile of this dish.
 
your post mentions carne seca; i wonder if that is similar to this product, which i made from venison? it is a cured product that is dry on the outside, and has all "extra" moisture removed from the inside - similar to pastourma of greece or pastramă of romania.  or would you say that it is more like jerky?
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Karl Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 February 2012 at 12:08
That sounds really good but is a little more than I want to attempt with locally available ingredients.  Besides, my wife hates beans.



I had to find a picture so I know what it should look like if I have a chance to cook it.   I am guessing that the first picture is typical cast iron "greying" which your recipe is trying to avoid by using earthenware and copper(?)  I take it that there are variations to this dish like there are to chili?    Also, can you spell feijoada out phonetically  please.

On the other part of your recipe that caught my interest, the copper pot used to cook it.  Is it lined with tin?  Do you happen to have pictures of the pots?  I am trying to learn to safely cook in copper. 

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Margi Cintrano Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 February 2012 at 12:40
 FEI JOE AH DAH = 4 syllables
 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Karl Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 February 2012 at 12:41
Oh no, they make a special feijoada "mud pot."  Stern Smile  I think that I might need one.....  I suspect that it would be good for chili and some of my other bean dishes too. 




This recipe does not sound nearly as good but all of the ingredients are available here: http://www.myrecipes.com/recipe/brazilian-feijoada-50400000110438/
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Margi Cintrano Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 February 2012 at 12:42
I have a photo that I shall be posting on Sunday.
The foto is quite a bit different than yours. The beans are black turtle ... very pretty colorful dish that you have, however, it is quite different than the one we had today for lunch.
 
I am in Portugual, and we are headed back to Spain on Sunday morning.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Margi Cintrano Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 February 2012 at 12:50

There are uncountable variations on Feijoada ... I personally do not care much for pig´s ears or tail and pig´s feet ( manitas = hands ) ... I love Portug. Italian or Spanish sausages ... and instead of calf´s tongue, I prefer a brisket type veal or beef ... I shall try to scan foto tomorrow so that u can see the way it is actually served ... each part of the FEI JOE AH DAH is cooked separately in the restaurant ... And it is eaten with white long grain rice, tropical fruits, veggies separately too and the beans with the sausages and brisket ... it is served buffet style --- so all are happy at the table ... The Italians have an old adage: WE ARE ALWAYS HAPPY AT THE TABLE ...

Off to dinner now --- very light ... and Portug Albarinho white wines ...
Until tomorrow
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Margi Cintrano Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 February 2012 at 12:51
CARNE SECA which is dried meat ... there is a Portuguese and Brazilian version ... yes, similar however, a bit darker ...
 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 February 2012 at 12:53
enjoy. margi ~ and thanks for all of your information!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Daikon Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 February 2012 at 14:59
Where does one find a pork lion?
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Karl Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 February 2012 at 16:02
Originally posted by Daikon Daikon wrote:

Where does one find a pork lion?




Locally at COSTCO.  Or:



Also I am thinking that the calf/beef tongue needs to stay in the recipe.  I am a fan of beef tongue and do not get to use it in enough recipes. 



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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Daikon Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 February 2012 at 17:57
Doesn't look very feline to me! Tongue
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Karl Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 February 2012 at 22:46
Originally posted by Daikon Daikon wrote:

Doesn't look very feline to me! Tongue




It is the African influence on the recipe. 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Hoser Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 February 2012 at 04:30
This sounds like my kind of dish...slow cooked to perfection.

This is peasant food at it's absolute best.
Go ahead...play with your food!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Margi Cintrano Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 February 2012 at 05:02
@ Hoser,
 
Yes, this is a real traditional traditional dish dating back to the 1500s.
 
This is the National Dish of Brazil ( however the roots are Portuguese ) and there is an enormous Spoon Tradition ( stews and soups ) tradition in Mediterranean ... Cassola is the Italian stew, cassoulet the French, cozido the Portuguese and cocido the Spanish ... Spoon stews are Beans, vegetables: onion, celery, potato, or tuber variety, meats of various types or fish or chicken or feathered game or hoofed game ... spices, carrot, turnip or beet root tops, collards, chard or kale etcetra ...
 
I make my black beans separately from the meat varieties ... Then towards the end, I put in the sausages. Also, I prepare a  pork lion roast in the oven to serve with it ... The sides are numerous and it is great for friends --- as it served buffet style --- with deep bowls and a spoon ...
 
M.C.  
 
 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Melissa Mead Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 February 2012 at 14:34
Karl: I love it! :)
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Margi Cintrano Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 February 2012 at 06:59
Thanks to all of you that have given feedback and input for the Feijoada. It is quite delicious on a very cold grey dark day.
 
Yes, do please use Copper or Earthenware --- vessels for cooking. This is a traditional dish and these types hold in the heat of the ingredients and give the ingredients their individual colors.
 
thanx again for all lovely notes.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Karl Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20 February 2012 at 13:26


Look what I found at the local thrift shop.  I even found turtle beans.  My bean hating wife leaves for Hawaii in a couple weeks so I can try this recipe. 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Melissa Mead Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20 February 2012 at 13:39
Cool!
:Grin: So I'm not alone! My husband's going on a trip later this year, and it's going to be Garlic Time. ;)
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Karl Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20 February 2012 at 13:44
Originally posted by Melissa Mead Melissa Mead wrote:

Cool!
:Grin: So I'm not alone! My husband's going on a trip later this year, and it's going to be Garlic Time. ;)


Yes, in my wife's own words: "I am allergic to half the world and won't eat much of the rest."  She absolutely hates the smell of beans.  She is not too fond of cabbage, vinegar (except NC BBQ), fondue, or chili.  So I stock up on things to cook when she is out of town. 
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