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Breakfast Sausage

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TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
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    Posted: 20 November 2017 at 13:03
I meant to post this a LONG time ago, but forgot; it was the first time I ever made breakfast sausage from scratch, and it seemed to me that I nailed it with the first attempt.

Here's the recipe:

Quote Breakfast Sausage

Per pound of ground pork:

1.25 teaspoons salt
1/2 teaspoon dried parsley
1/4 teaspoon rubbed sage
1/4 teaspoon fresh coarse ground black pepper
1/4 teaspoon dried summer savory
1/4 teaspoon ground coriander
* Optional: 1/4 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes (or substitute paprika)
* Optional: 1/4 teaspoon MSG (Such as Accent flavor enhancer)

For all spices, use a generous or scant measurement, according to your tastes.

Mix the spices into the sausage thoroughly, adding a little water, beer or other similar liquid (if necessary) in order to reach a desired consistency.

Best results seem to be obtained by allowing the sausage to refrigerate overnight, so that the flavours can meld.
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TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26 November 2018 at 12:05
Here's another breakfast sausage recipe I would like to try sometime; it comes from Bon App├ętit, of all places:

Quote BA's Best Breakfast Sausage



These breakfast sausage patties are perfect for freezing, extra insurance toward future hangovers.

1 tablespoon finely chopped fresh sage
1 tablespoon finely chopped fresh thyme
2 teaspoons light brown sugar
1.5 teaspoons kosher salt
1 teaspoon crushed fennel seeds
1/2 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1/4 teaspoon garlic powder
1/4 teaspoon smoked paprika
1 pound ground pork shoulder

Mix sage, thyme, brown sugar, salt, fennel seeds, red pepper flakes, black pepper, garlic powder, and paprika in a medium bowl. Add pork and work spice mixture into meat with your hands until it's very well blended.

Scoop out 1/4-cupfuls of mixture and flatten into about 1/4-inch-thick patties (they will plump slightly when cooked).

Griddle sausage over medium-high heat until browned on one side, about 2 minutes. Flip and cook 2 minutes more.

Do Ahead: Patties can be made 2 days ahead. Stack between parchment paper; cover and chill, or freeze up to 1 month.

https://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/ba-breakfast-sausage
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Tom Kurth View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Tom Kurth Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26 November 2018 at 15:04
This raises a question for me: You're using ground pork which I guess is probably 75%-80% lean. If one wishes to grind their own pork--pork shoulder is commonly bargain priced--how do you determent the amount of fat present? Do you have to cut it all up and weigh out the fat and the lean? Or is there some guesstimate by golly gee whiz that can get you close enough? Thanks.
Best,
Tom

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TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26 November 2018 at 15:07
Hi, Tom -

I hate to sound cavalier about it, but this is pretty close to the mark:

>>>Or is there some guesstimate by golly gee whiz that can get you close enough?<<<

For me, a perfect percentage isn't necessary, especially since much of the time I'd most likely (but not always) be mixing with venison. Sausage has always been a convenient way to use trimmings, leftovers and other bits and bobs that result from the slaughter, and in my opinion modern hobbyists run the risk of getting a little too hung up on perfect percentages. I could be wrong in a purist sense, but the ground pork that I have as a by-product of getting a half of pork and the ground pork that would come from grinding a pork shoulder are both equally acceptable, to me.

In short, as long as it holds together and doesn't taste like cardboard, I'm good with it.
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pitrow View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote pitrow Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26 November 2018 at 16:16
Originally posted by Tom Kurth Tom Kurth wrote:

This raises a question for me: You're using ground pork which I guess is probably 75%-80% lean. If one wishes to grind their own pork--pork shoulder is commonly bargain priced--how do you determent the amount of fat present? Do you have to cut it all up and weigh out the fat and the lean? Or is there some guesstimate by golly gee whiz that can get you close enough? Thanks.


I've been looking for something like this as well, at least a guideline on what you can expect. But there doesn;t seem to be anything like that out there. I'm guessing because each animal is different it's hard to nail down a specific percent fat, but there should at least be a general range. Like say pork shoulder is typically 80 - 90% lean (just guessing there).

The best I've seen so far is to just eye-ball it based on how much meat to fat you can see, then add 5% to account for intramuscular fat that you can't see.
Mike
Life in PitRow - My often neglected, somewhat eccentric, occasionally outstanding blog
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