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Bubble & Squeak

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    Posted: 14 November 2010 at 12:36
Got to begin by saying that Hoser's wonderful post on Braised Red Cabbage got me craving some. Talking it over with Mrs Rivet and thinking about what to make alongside (he also posted some fantastic schnitzels) what with the leftover leg of lamb I knew we'd have, I decided to go with a simple bubble & squeak.
 
For starters, this is nowhere near the original, authentic "bubble and squeak" from England. It is an Americanized version, fairly removed from the original, but one I grew up with. Everyone who made it also called this dish bubble and squeak when I was a kid.
 
So, here I present our version of bubble and squeak, a cabbage, onion and potato dish that may or may not contain some sort of bits of sausage. More often than not, that was usually served on the side to make a complete meal.
 
Here's the goods. not pictured are the potatoes and pepper, I forgot.
 
 
Here they appear once prepped. I used about 4 large potatoes, six garlic cloves and most of the bunch of parsley
 
 
In a separate bowl, I combined 3 generous TBSP of oregano, 2 of thyme, 1 each of tarragon and sage. All these are from Mrs Rivet's herb garden and dried earlier this fall. Also used a generous pinch of cardamon. Mix them all together in a bowl.
 
 
In a tall stock pot, put about 1/4 cup olive oil or butter, enough to generously coat the bottom. Then put a tight single layer of potatoes down on this. This is a key step as the potatoes will act as an insulator for the cabbage and onions as they cook and won't burn, plus you get nice golden potatoes at the bottom of the pot when it is done. On top of the potatoes, add a handfull of onions, some parsley and a generous amount of salt.
 
 
Add half the cabbage on top of that and about half the herbs from the bowl...
 
 
Then another layer of potatoes, onions, the parsley, remaining herbs, garlics, salt and pepper. Heres the wonderful peppercorns and built-in grinder Mrs Rivet found at Sams club. Real nice fresh peppercorns that smell great. Put the equivalent of about 1 TBSP in there.
 
 
Final half of cabbage, some onioons, the remaining parsley and more salt. On top of this, pour about 1/4 to 1/2 cup of olive oil, or butter, then about 2 cups water over that. You can use chicken broth instead or partially; I sometimes toss in a couple chicken boullion cubes. White wine can also be substituted for half the water.
 
 
Turn on the heat to high and listen to it start bubbling and boiling. Put the tight fittin lid on that and listen until you can really hear it boiling, then turn down the heat to medium-low. Leave covered and do not peek.
 
In about an hour, maybe two depending on your stove it will be done. More pics to come of this delicious dish!
 
 
 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14 November 2010 at 13:39
i have never heard of this, but it does look good! will be waiting to see the results!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14 November 2010 at 16:11
Okay at pretty much the one hour mark, the bubble and squeak was done. At one hour, pop the lid open (be careful for steam burns) and poke a fork into the cabbage. If it goes in easily it is done. You can turn off the heat, put the lid back on and keep the pot hot for hours more if you need to. The smell is delicious, and once that lid comes off you have everyone coming around for a peek (even the cats).
 
Mrs Rivet took this morning's opportunity to make some more of her famous sourdough buns which not only smell delicious but went really well with the bubble and squeak.
 
 
The bubble and squeak makes a perfect quick snack in a bowl as well as a meal!
 
 
Often times growing up, bubble and squeak, some cornbread and sliced garden tomatoes were supper, and that was plenty good, too! Bubble and squeak also made good breakfasts with bacon and fried eggs.
 
Today though, bubble and squeak was supper with hot buttered sourdough buns and some grilled burgers I found in the freezer that I reheated in a skillet. This was good stuff!
 
 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Hoser Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 November 2010 at 03:38
I'm still curious about the name John. "bubble and squeak"...is it a reference to possible after effects of the dish?
Go ahead...play with your food!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 November 2010 at 04:48
Hi, bubble and squeak is the name given to the original dish. The authentic one from England uses leftovers from sunday's pot roast...the vegetables. The potatoes (and sometimes carrots and peas) are mashed and fried with chopped fresh cabbage in a large skillet...usually with bacon fat. The sound the cooking cabbage makes is bubbling and squeaking against the pan as it is stirred.
The dish has evolved into just cooking it all in a pot. Furtrher evolutions have resulted in my version above.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Hoser Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 November 2010 at 05:16
You learn something new every single day....thanks for the explanationBig smile

Go ahead...play with your food!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 November 2010 at 15:36
This looks like so much fun! It must be the name...
I didn't really like cabbage as a kid, but if we had this I might have eaten it.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 November 2010 at 16:14
Coxie, I do think you'd like this. It is a mild, gentle flavoured dish that goes well with justabout anything. If you tend to like vegetables, then this one is one to make.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Hoser Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 November 2010 at 03:27
This appears to be a great deal like the traditional Irish Colcannon which is served with the St Patty's day leftovers. A very nice unobtrusive dish.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 07 December 2010 at 15:35
Dave, never had Colcannon that I know of but I think you are right- it is an unobtrusive dish, though very tasty. You can really ramp up the flavor by adding crumbled leftover bacon to it, or ham bits.
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