Foods of the World Forum Homepage
Forum Home Forum Home > Other Food-Related Topics > The Library
  New Posts New Posts RSS Feed - Canonical cookbooks and nominations
  FAQ FAQ  Forum Search   Events   Register Register  Login Login

This site is completely supported by donations; there are no corporate sponsors. We would be honoured if you would consider a small donation, to be used exclusively for forum expenses.



Thank you, from the Foods of the World Forums!

Canonical cookbooks and nominations

 Post Reply Post Reply Page  123>
Author
Message
Daikon View Drop Down
Chef's Apprentice
Chef's Apprentice
Avatar

Joined: 20 October 2011
Location: San Francisco
Status: Offline
Points: 379
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Daikon Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: Canonical cookbooks and nominations
    Posted: 19 March 2012 at 13:41
There are lots and lots and lots of cookbooks out there.  Many of them are useful or inspirational, but there are only a few that legitimately form the canon of at least one cuisine.  I am thinking of definitive, encyclopedic works like Marie Antoine Carême's L'Art de la Cuisine Française and Georges Auguste Escoffier's Le Guide Culinaire.  Then there are important secondary works like Julia Child's Mastering the Art of French Cooking, and there are significant, more recent treatises and textbooks like Shirley O. Corriher's Cookwise and Bakewise, Nathan Myhrvold's Modernist Cuisine, James Peterson's Sauces, various Culinary Institute of America texts (right now, I've got my eye on the CIA's Garde Manger.)

What I am interested in here is putting together a list of "important" cookbooks -- books that are definitely many steps removed from one put out by the women's auxiliary of your neighborhood church, and are also quite different from most celebrity chef cookbooks.  I'm also not interested in introductory or survey texts that aim to give you a first taste or an overview of one or more cuisines, a family of techniques, etc.  What I am looking for are the truly definitive texts, the places that you would go to find the first, last, best, and most comprehensive words on culinary matters.  That's actually probably a fairly good taxonomy for labeling the books I am interested in.  For example, Carême in some sense is the first word on French cooking (although I am sure that some of the food historians among us can identify even earlier important works), Escoffier is the most comprehensive on classical French cuisine, but neither of them are the best (particularly for non-French-speaking cooks) since their recipes can often be difficult to follow or interpret.  Some might classify Julia Child as the best work on French cooking for English-speakers, but that is open to dispute/discussion...  And books like Cookwise, Bakewise, and Modernist Cuisine all aim in some fashion to be the last word on particular culinary topics, seeking to cut through received wisdom (and nonsense) and rules-of-thumb to identify and explain the basic science that makes certain foods and techniques work.

Anyway, I hope I've been clear enough in identifying the kinds of cookbooks that I am interested in listing, and I think I've given us a decent start on such a list, but I'm interested in seeing what your contributions to this list of great and near-great cookbooks will include and how they can help fill the huge gaps in my knowledge (e.g., who were the Carême and Escoffier of Indian cuisine?  Chinese? Italian? ...?)  I'll try to keep the list updated in the first post.

The List
  • Marie Antoine Carême, L'Art de la Cuisine Française -- first word in classical French cuisine
  • Georges Auguste Escoffier, Le Guide Culinaire -- most comprehensive on classical French cuisine
  • Julia Child, Louisette Bertholle, Simone Beck, Mastering the Art of French Cooking -- most comprehensive and best on classical French cuisine for English-speakers
  • Nathan Myhrvold et al.Modernist Cuisine -- last and most comprehensive on "modernist" techniques
  • Shirley O. Corriher, Cookwise -- last word on many basic techniques, and best at explaining them  
  • Shirley O. Corriher, Bakewise -- last and best word on the science of baking
  • James Peterson, Sauces -- best up-to-date word on sauces
  • Harold McGee, On Food and Cooking: The Science and Lore of the Kitchen -- the first word on the last word
  • Jacques Pepin, Complete Techniques

The Nominees
  • Rytek Kutas, Great Sausage Recipies & Meat Curing
  • Michael Ruhlman, Brian Polcyn, Charcuterie: The Craft of Salting, Smoking, and Curing
  • Bruce Aidells, Denis Kelly, The Complete Meat Cookbook: A Juicy and Authoritative Guide to Selecting, Seasoning, and Cooking Today's Beef, Pork, Lamb, and Veal
  • Bruce Aidells, The Great Meat Cookbook: Everything You Need to Know to Buy and Cook Today's Meat
  • Stanley Marianski, Adam Marianski, Home Production of Quality Meats and Sausages
  • Jacques Pepin, La Technique
  • Jacques Pepin, La Methode
  • Rick Bayless, Authentic Mexican: Regional Cooking from the Heart of Mexico
  • Claudia Roden, Book of Jewish Food
  • John D. Folse, The Encyclopedia of Cajun & Creole Cuisine
  • Eliza Smith, The Compleat Housewife
  • Fannie Farmer, Boston Cooking School Cook Book
  • Mrs. Simon Kander, Mrs. Henry Schoenfeld, The Settlement Cook Book: The Way to a Man's Heart
  • Nancy Carter Crump, Hearthside Cooking: Early American Southern Cuisine Updated for Today's Hearth and Cookstove
  • Steven Raichlen, Planet Barbecue!
  • Gloria Bley Miller, The Thousand Recipe Chinese Cookbook -- not a book to learn Chinese cooking from, but a valuable "last word" book on Chinese recipes
  • Simone Ortega, 1080 recetas de cocina (available in English as 1080 Recipes) -- a general kitchen reference for Spanish home cooks, but lacking in technical and historical material
  • Karlos Arguiñano,  Como Preparar... -- a multi-volume set on Spanish cuisine (in Spanish).
  • Alicia Ríos, Lourdes Marche, The Heritage of Spanish Cooking
Back to Top
TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar

Joined: 25 January 2010
Location: Chinook, MT
Status: Offline
Points: 8600
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20 March 2012 at 08:47
i don't have much to contribute here, since i don't consider my main sources (the culinaria series and the "foods of the world" series) to be in the same class at all - but i am looking forward to the discussion on this, and learning from it.
 
great topic, daikon ~
If you are a visitor and like what you see, please click here and join the discussions in our community!
Back to Top
pitrow View Drop Down
Chef
Chef
Avatar

Joined: 22 November 2010
Location: Newberg, Oregon
Status: Offline
Points: 864
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote pitrow Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20 March 2012 at 08:59
Not sure if these fall in the same category as you've started or not, but for anyone doing sausage making or the like, these two are considered the Bibles...

Charcuterie: The Craft of Salting, Smoking, and Curing -- Brian Polcyn and Michael Ruhlman
Great Sausage Recipes & Meat Curing -- Rytek Kutas
Back to Top
Daikon View Drop Down
Chef's Apprentice
Chef's Apprentice
Avatar

Joined: 20 October 2011
Location: San Francisco
Status: Offline
Points: 379
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Daikon Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20 March 2012 at 09:56
Hmmm... and now I am stuck with the task of deciding whether a book deserves inclusion on the list, even though I can't possibly examine and review each of the nominees myself.  Here's what I think I'll do: Older books that still receive a lot of mentions in online discussions of best cookbooks are pretty much guaranteed a place on the list -- I'm biasing toward classics and away from whatever happens to be most recent; If I can easily find a lot of online references that clearly position a nominated book as the first, best, last, or most comprehensive word on a subject, then I'll put it on the list; If I can find some such references, but they are not entirely convincing or leave me with some reservations, I'll put them on a "nominees" list and let the rest of you try to convince me whether they should be moved up into the real list or should be dropped even from the nominees list; If I'm not initially impressed by what I am able to easily find out about your nominee, then I won't put it on the nominees list until I see a significant amount of protest over my omission.

So, for your two nominees, pitrow, I was able to find enough supporting evidence (largely here: http://forums.egullet.org/index.php?/topic/131433-best-charcuterie-cookbooks/) to put both books on the nominees list, but I have some reservations about Ruhlman and Polcyn's book repeatedly being referred to as a good starter book with some errors, and I haven't yet seen enough discussion about Kutas to make a final decision.  (I also found this comment from the eGullet discussion interesting: "I think the Great Charcuterie Book has yet to be written...") Further comments, links to reviews, etc. always welcome, as are indications as to whether you think a book fits into one or more of the first, best, last, and most comprehensive categories....
Back to Top
TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar

Joined: 25 January 2010
Location: Chinook, MT
Status: Offline
Points: 8600
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20 March 2012 at 10:13
for what it's worth, the sausage, curing and charcuterie places i hang out at all point to rytek as "the bible" where these topics are concerned.
If you are a visitor and like what you see, please click here and join the discussions in our community!
Back to Top
TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar

Joined: 25 January 2010
Location: Chinook, MT
Status: Offline
Points: 8600
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20 March 2012 at 10:31
say, daikon, i might be able to find some source material on various countries if you are interested. both the culinaria and FotW volumes have pretty extensive bibliographies, and there might be some information there you could find useful.
If you are a visitor and like what you see, please click here and join the discussions in our community!
Back to Top
HistoricFoodie View Drop Down
Master Chef
Master Chef


Joined: 21 February 2012
Location: Kentucky
Status: Offline
Points: 4409
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20 March 2012 at 10:40
Daikon, I suspect that any book you choose to include will have its detractors; especally considering that the needs of a professional in the industry, and the needs of a home cook---even an advanced foodie---are often quite different.
 
So the open question is: Where do you draw the line?
 
Then, what about books that are neither definative nor "best" (whatever that means), but which make a significant contribution to the state of the art. Would you include, for instance, Bruce Aidells The Complete Meat Cookbook on your list? To me, it fits the rubric I just described.
 
Another aspect: With the proviso that I don't find egullet to be a particularly authoritative voice, let's look at this quote: "I think the Great Charcuterie Book has yet to be written..."). Let's assume this is correct. There is certainly, among the current books on charcuterie, one that is the best of the breed. Do you leave it off your list because a better one is waiting to be written?
 
And, finally, how do you fit textbooks into the listing? Among professionals, for instance, John Kowalski's relatively new The Art of Charcuterie, written for the CIA, is likely to surpass both the Polcyn and Kutas books in importance. But what does that mean to the semi-pro, or hobbiest? Kowalski's book might, objectively, be the most important (the "best" if you will), but for them, it's not as useful as the Polcyn.
 
Ha! Betcha thought this would be easy. Shocked
 
Back to Top
Daikon View Drop Down
Chef's Apprentice
Chef's Apprentice
Avatar

Joined: 20 October 2011
Location: San Francisco
Status: Offline
Points: 379
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Daikon Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20 March 2012 at 11:31
On the contrary, I had no illusions that the task would be easy, and I share many of your concerns -- particularly as to how more specialized books like culinary arts textbooks, publications aimed at commercial food scientists, and government food regulations fit in.  Are people interested in collecting a list including the important or definitive works in these areas of more direct concern to food professionals, or should we restrict ourselves only to works that are more accessible and applicable to home cooks?  Personally, I find culinary textbooks quite useful, and have no problem declaring most of them to be good; but which of them are truly great or important?

Anyway, Aidell's big book, at over 600 pages (and not a complete newcomer at more than 10 years-old), deserves at least a nominee listing as a comprehensive work on meat.
Back to Top
HistoricFoodie View Drop Down
Master Chef
Master Chef


Joined: 21 February 2012
Location: Kentucky
Status: Offline
Points: 4409
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20 March 2012 at 14:30
Are people interested in collecting a list including the important or definitive works in these areas of more direct concern to food professionals, .......
 
And if they are, how do you decide which to include? Is The Professioal Chef the definative work of this type? If you attended the CIA you might think so. If not, perhaps not.
 
and not a complete newcomer at more than 10 years-old
 
Er, uhm, eh who was it that mentioned Careme? Approve
And the first edition of Sauces was published nearly 30 years ago. The current (3rd) edition was published in 2008.
 
I'm just pulling your chain on this, of course. If age were a criterium there would be no great books.
 
One on-going problem will be the scope of any book. Practically by definition, the broader its nature, the more superficial it is. The more tightly drawn, the more precise. So, while I agree that Sauces is an important work, that belongs on your list, is it more important than, say, a book only a hundred pages long that explores only white sauces in depth? Take that as rhetorical, cuz I wouldn't even attempt answering it.
 
Another question (I'm great at questions, not so good at answers) is: who is such a list for? It could be argued, for instance, that, in America at least, Joy Of Cooking is the most important culinary work every published. Certainly the most influential. Yet it holds no place in my culinary library, nor, I suspect, in yours.
 
By the same token, if you leave Harold McGee off your list, shame on you.
 
 
 
Back to Top
Hoser View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar

Joined: 06 February 2010
Location: Cumberland, RI
Status: Offline
Points: 3368
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Hoser Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20 March 2012 at 14:40
I would like to nominate what I consider to be a masterful work...Jacques Pepin's Complete Techniques, which delves into what we all want to know....exactly how to bone out a rabbit, make a decent glace...you name it...it's in there. It is written in excruciating detail, with photos of each step along the way.
I highly recommend this tome for any serious foodie.

Go ahead...play with your food!
Back to Top
Daikon View Drop Down
Chef's Apprentice
Chef's Apprentice
Avatar

Joined: 20 October 2011
Location: San Francisco
Status: Offline
Points: 379
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Daikon Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20 March 2012 at 15:18
McGee's On Food and Cooking definitely belongs on the list proper -- it's kind of the first word on the last-word type books.

I actually haven't looked at Pepin's Complete Techniques, but I'm a big fan of his and of his technical knowledge and skill, so I have no problem putting it on the nominees list -- and would take very little nudging and evidence for me to promote it to the main list.
Back to Top
Daikon View Drop Down
Chef's Apprentice
Chef's Apprentice
Avatar

Joined: 20 October 2011
Location: San Francisco
Status: Offline
Points: 379
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Daikon Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20 March 2012 at 15:36
Originally posted by HistoricFoodie HistoricFoodie wrote:

Are people interested in collecting a list including the important or definitive works in these areas of more direct concern to food professionals, .......
 
And if they are, how do you decide which to include? Is The Professioal Chef the definative work of this type? If you attended the CIA you might think so. If not, perhaps not.
Inclusion of textbooks remains an open question...  I suppose if one were unquestionably great and important, its nature as a textbook (or cross-over, professional/non-professional book) will be of lesser importance.
 
Quote and not a complete newcomer at more than 10 years-old
 
Er, uhm, eh who was it that mentioned Careme? Approve
And the first edition of Sauces was published nearly 30 years ago. The current (3rd) edition was published in 2008.
 
I'm just pulling your chain on this, of course. If age were a criterium there would be no great books.
At least one of us isn't communicating well.  For me, the fact that a cookbook is old and is still frequently mentioned as among the best and most important is a major plus, while I am suspicious of whether the latest is really the greatest despite generating significant buzz.
 
Quote One on-going problem will be the scope of any book. Practically by definition, the broader its nature, the more superficial it is. The more tightly drawn, the more precise. So, while I agree that Sauces is an important work, that belongs on your list, is it more important than, say, a book only a hundred pages long that explores only white sauces in depth? Take that as rhetorical, cuz I wouldn't even attempt answering it.
I think specialist books of more limited scope are going to have a hard time making it off the nominees list -- but there are undoubtedly some good ones that deserve some recognition there.
 
Quote Another question (I'm great at questions, not so good at answers) is: who is such a list for? It could be argued, for instance, that, in America at least, Joy Of Cooking is the most important culinary work every published. Certainly the most influential. Yet it holds no place in my culinary library, nor, I suspect, in yours.
Well, it's for me, of course -- y'all just get to tag along and do much of the work! LOL  That being said, Joy of Cooking has no importance or significance for me (I've never even read from it more than an isolated recipe here or there -- and I'm not sure I ever actually used one of those recipes instead of something that I deemed better found elsewhere...), nor do I imagine that it ever will have much meaning for me, so it doesn't get a spot on the list.
Back to Top
Daikon View Drop Down
Chef's Apprentice
Chef's Apprentice
Avatar

Joined: 20 October 2011
Location: San Francisco
Status: Offline
Points: 379
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Daikon Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20 March 2012 at 15:46
Okay, Pepin fans, which deserve to be on the list and which deserve to stay nominees: the more recent Complete Techniques, or the earlier and slightly larger pair La Technique and La Methode?
Back to Top
Rod Franklin View Drop Down
Chef
Chef
Avatar

Joined: 17 February 2010
Location: USA
Status: Offline
Points: 916
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Rod Franklin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20 March 2012 at 19:17
I can't contribute any titles to this thread, but count me as having a lot of respect for the technical abilities of Pepin. I look forward to the compiled list of must have books.
Hungry
Back to Top
Hoser View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar

Joined: 06 February 2010
Location: Cumberland, RI
Status: Offline
Points: 3368
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Hoser Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 March 2012 at 02:40
Originally posted by HistoricFoodie HistoricFoodie wrote:


 
Another question (I'm great at questions, not so good at answers) is: who is such a list for? It could be argued, for instance, that, in America at least, Joy Of Cooking is the most important culinary work every published. Certainly the most influential. Yet it holds no place in my culinary library, nor, I suspect, in yours.
 

Actually, Joy of Cooking is in my library and I admit to referring to it often. It is a very informative work, especially in the area of knowing different ingredients.

And from what I see Jacques Pepins Complete Techniques is a condensed version of La technique and La Method, cleaned up a bit and organized a little better, but since I do not own the original I do not feel qualified to pick which one should stay on the library list.
Go ahead...play with your food!
Back to Top
HistoricFoodie View Drop Down
Master Chef
Master Chef


Joined: 21 February 2012
Location: Kentucky
Status: Offline
Points: 4409
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 March 2012 at 02:58
Actually, Joy of Cooking is in my library and I admit to referring to it often. It is a very informative work, especially in the area of knowing different ingredients.
 
I rest my case.
 
Joy is in what, now? The 8th edition? Something like that. Thousands of Americans actually learned to cook using it; thousands of others developed advanced skills and knowledge of terms and techniques as a result of being exposed to it. I was not being facetious when I said it's the most influential cookbook in American culinary history.
 
By the time I "discovered" Joy of Cooking I had already progressed beyond it. So I've never owned a copy, and see no need to do so. Nor, despite it's importance to the culinary arts, do I believe it fits Daikon's concept.
 
 
 
Back to Top
HistoricFoodie View Drop Down
Master Chef
Master Chef


Joined: 21 February 2012
Location: Kentucky
Status: Offline
Points: 4409
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 March 2012 at 03:30
e.g., who were the Carême and Escoffier of Indian cuisine?  Chinese? Italian? ...?
 
This is the crux of the problem, Daikon.
 
The one thing that Careme and Escoffier did was codify French cooking, and, as it happens, cast it in stone. This had never before been done with a cuisine, nor has it been done since.
 
Most national cuisines aren't. We say "Italian," or "Indian," or "Chinese," or "Greek." But those are only shorthand for describing groups of related cuisines inside arbitrary political borders. Each "national" cuisine is actually regional in nature, and represents different influences, both internal and external.
 
Because Careme and Escoffier codified it, there is a unified whole called classic French cuisine. But the same cannot be said of any other I'm aware of. Thus, there is no definative book about Italian cuisine, for instance, because there is no unified whole making up such a cuisine. We look at culinary practices of the ER, for instance, and of Sicily, and call them both Italian. Yet they have little to do with each other. They use different ingredients, have different geographies affecting their agricuture, and have certainly been influenced differently by outsiders.
 
What I'm saying is that L'Art de la Cuisine Française's influence was an accident, one that is not likely to happen again.
Back to Top
Hoser View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar

Joined: 06 February 2010
Location: Cumberland, RI
Status: Offline
Points: 3368
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Hoser Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 March 2012 at 04:05
Originally posted by HistoricFoodie HistoricFoodie wrote:


 
Most national cuisines aren't. We say "Italian," or "Indian," or "Chinese," or "Greek." But those are only shorthand for describing groups of related cuisines inside arbitrary political borders. Each "national" cuisine is actually regional in nature, and represents different influences, both internal and external.
 

I suppose the closest thing to a "bible" of Italian cuisine would be The Silver Spoon published in English by Phaidon press. Much like Joy of Cooking, it is more a collection of recipes than a compendium of Italian technique, because that simply does not exist. I think the regionalization of cooking is probably more evident in Italian cooking than almost any other culture.
Go ahead...play with your food!
Back to Top
HistoricFoodie View Drop Down
Master Chef
Master Chef


Joined: 21 February 2012
Location: Kentucky
Status: Offline
Points: 4409
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 March 2012 at 04:40
I think the regionalization of cooking is probably more evident in Italian cooking than almost any other culture.
 
I'd have to disagree with that, Dave.
 
Because Italian is the most familiar ethnic cuisine we tend to know more about it. But, in fact, all of the countries lining the north shore of the Med have the same sort of regionalization. And for the same reason: Each of them is actually a confederation of countries, city states, and ethnicities. 
 
Just ask Margi, for example, about the various regions (and ethnic animosities) that make up Spain.
 
Although less regionalized, the southern Med's cuisines are broken down ethnically within three large groups. Turkey is regional. So is the group of countries we used to identify as Persian.
 
All of Asia is regionalized, sometimes with an even greater disparity than that comparing ER & Sicily. India's cuisine is broken down both regionally and ethnically; most southeast Asian countries have similar separations (i.e., Viet Nam's cusine breaks down into both ethinic and regional differences---which are often the same, btw--- plus the unique Franco-Nam fusian foods). China has 7 major cuisines and who knows how many differences within them. And so forth.
 
I have always disliked the word "fusion." On one hand, it too often refers to the act of adding generic Asian ingredients to an otherwise unremarkable dish to produce a truly awful one. But, more to the point, a case can be made that all cusines are fusions.
 
Back to Top
HistoricFoodie View Drop Down
Master Chef
Master Chef


Joined: 21 February 2012
Location: Kentucky
Status: Offline
Points: 4409
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 March 2012 at 04:43
Comparing The Silver Spoon to Joy Of Cooking was pretty astute. Not only are they similar in nature, they are most often purchased for the same reason---to be used as gifts for new brides. More recently there is a Spanish analog called something like 1001 Recipes that is achieving the same sort of status.
Back to Top
 Post Reply Post Reply Page  123>
  Share Topic   

Forum Jump Forum Permissions View Drop Down



This page was generated in 0.078 seconds.