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Carbonade Flamande

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Margi Cintrano View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Margi Cintrano Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 December 2017 at 15:20
Tas,

I recall this fabulous classic ..  Uncountable versions !  Each family, Chef and restaurant has their own take on it ..


I have never prepared or compared  Chris´s récipe to the late Julia Child´s however, Chris is from this región and Julia spent some time in  France and attended culumary training there ..

Sincé you have made the dish several times, I am sure you have "your expertise" and take on the dish too ..

So, enjoy. It is perfect for this weather .. 

Maybe I shall prepare it when I am my Winter vacation 22nd December to the 8th January.  

I have to see Chris´s  original récipe and then read the whole thread ..  And look at your notes and check Julia´s  récipe .. I have the book plus I would also check Culinaria France and quite a few other books I have from Le  Cordón Bleu ..  

All my best for a lovely weekend ..  


www.guidepost.es
Gourmet´s Choice - Time Out In Spain ...

WEBSITE: www.visionsgourmandes.com
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TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 December 2017 at 15:35
That sounds like a plan, Margi!

The second recipe that I am posting comes from the spiral-bound supplement book of recipes that is a companion to Time/Life's Foods of the World volume dealing with Belgian cuisine:

Quote Carbonnades a la Flamande
Flemish Beef-And-Beer Stew

From Time/Life's Foods of the World - A Quintet of Cuisines (1970)

To serve 4:

3 pounds lean boneless beef chuck, sliced ½ inch thick, then cut into strips 2 inches long and 1 inch wide
1 teaspoon salt
Freshly ground black pepper
4 to 6 tablespoons lard
1/2 pound lean sliced or slab bacon, cut into 1/4-inch pieces
4 cups thinly sliced onions (about 1 pound)
1/2 teaspoon finely chopped garlic
2 tablespoons flour
2 cups (16 ounces) beer, preferably dark beer
1 cup beef stock, fresh or canned
A bouquet of 4 fresh parsley sprigs and 1 medium-sized bay leaf, tied together with string
1/2 teaspoon crumbled dried thyme
1 teaspoon sugar
2 tablespoons red wine vinegar

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees*. Pat the strips of beef completely dry with paper towels and drop them into a bowl. Sprinkle with the salt and a few grindings of pepper and toss the meat about with a wooden spoon until it is evenly seasoned.

In a heavy 4- to 5-quart enameled or stainless-steel casserole, melt 4 tablespoons of the lard over high heat until it is very hot but not smoking.

Brown the beef in the hot lard, a handful at a time, turning the strips frequently with a slotted spoon and regulating the heat so that they color richly and evenly without burning.

As they brown, transfer the pieces of beef to a plate and brown the remaining meat similarly, adding more lard to the pan if necessary.

Drop the bacon bits into the fat remaining in the casserole and, stirring frequently, cook over moderate heat until the bits are brown and crisp and have rendered all their fat.

With a slotted spoon, transfer the bacon to paper towels to drain. Pour all but about 1/4 cup of fat from the casserole.

Add the onions to the casserole. Stirring frequently, cook over moderate heat for about 15 minutes, or until the onions are soft and delicately browned. Add the garlic and stir in the flour with a wooden spoon.

When the flour is completely absorbed, pour in the beer and 1/2 cup of the beef stock. Bring to a boil over high heat, stirring constantly with a whisk until the sauce thickens.

Add the bouquet of parsley and bay leaf, the thyme and sugar, and return the beef and any liquid that has accumulated around it to the casserole. Stir in the bacon.

The liquid should completely cover the meat; if necessary add up to 1/2 cup more of the stock. Cover tightly and place the casserole in the middle of the oven.

Bake for 1.5 hours*, or until the beef is tender. Just before serving, stir in the vinegar and taste for seasoning. Serve at once, directly from the casserole or from a large heated bowl.

NOTE: Carbonnades a la Flamande is traditionally accompanied by hot boiled potatoes.

*This seems too high (temperature) and too short (cooking time) to me; if you try this, I would suggest using the lower temperatures and longer cooking times discussed in previous posts.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 December 2017 at 13:39
Well, I have some very good news ~

As we all know, Photobucket has recently delivered many forums (including ours) a severe blow. Because of this, Chris's beautiful photos of his preparations and methods for Carbonnade were lost.

However, with the recent re-kindling of my interest in this wonderful dish, I wrote to Chris and asked if he would be so kind as to re-send them. I am happy and grateful to say that Chris was very willing to share them again, so I have returned those photos to his post.

Chris also included another recent version that he prepared, which was made with varkenswang (pig's cheeks) and served on a bed of creamy polenta:



If I am able to get any other photos of this most special of meals, I will be sure to post them. If anyone else makes this, please share your experience with us!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 December 2017 at 16:13
Adding to the "collective knowledge" of this dish, here is the recipe provided by Saveur's Online Magazine:

Quote Carbonnade
Flemish Beef and Beer Stew



Quote I've turned out many plates in my career, but only certain dishes have become meals I feed my own family, like boeuf carbonnade a la flamande. I was taught to make this Flemish beef and onion stew by my mentor, Belgian chef Leon Dhaenens, when I was a young cook. Unlike French beef stews made with wine, carbonnade relies on the deep, dark flavor of Belgian abbey-style beer. But what really gives carbonnade its distinctive character is the addition of brown sugar and a fillip of cider vinegar, a sweet-sour combination that plays beautifully against the caramelized onions and rich beer.

—Charlie Palmer, chef-owner of Aureole in New York City and Las Vegas


To serve 4:

Ingredients

2 lb. beef chuck, cut into 2″ x 1⁄2″-thick slices
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste
1⁄4 cup flour
4 tbsp. unsalted butter
4 slices bacon, finely chopped
6 cloves garlic, finely chopped
3 medium yellow onions, thinly sliced lengthwise
2 cups Belgian-style ale, like Ommegang Abbey Ale
1 cup beef stock
2 tbsp. dark brown sugar
2 tbsp. apple cider vinegar
3 sprigs thyme
3 sprigs parsley
2 sprigs tarragon
1 bay leaf

Bread, for serving

Instructions

Season beef with salt and pepper in a bowl; add flour and toss to coat. Heat 2 tbsp. butter in a 6-qt. Dutch oven over medium-high heat. Working in batches, add beef; cook, turning, until browned, about 8 minutes. Transfer to a plate; set aside. Add bacon; cook until its fat renders, about 8 minutes. Add remaining butter, garlic, and onions; cook until caramelized, about 30 minutes. Add half the beer; cook, scraping bottom of pot, until slightly reduced, about 4 minutes. Return beef to pot with remaining beer, stock, sugar, vinegar, thyme, parsley, tarragon, bay leaf, and salt and pepper; boil. Reduce heat to medium-low; cook, covered, until beef is tender, about 1 ½ hours. Serve with bread.


https://www.saveur.com/article/Recipes/Classic-Beef-Beer-Stew
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