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Cherry liqueur

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africanmeat View Drop Down
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    Posted: 22 January 2012 at 08:40

My dad use to do cherry liqueur every 2 years

It is a sweet liqueur for after diner

A i started to do it 10 years ago from sour cherry he use to do it with Tzuika a Romanian

Liqueur 40-60% alcohol i cant find it in south Africa so i use vodka.

In a big jar i put the cherry with sugar an leave it for 3 weeks

Than i strain ½ of it in to a big bottle add 1 bottle of vodka in to the strain cherry and one bottle to the jar and leave it for 1 weeks .

The one on the right is from 4 years ago and the one on the left is the new one

 

 

Thanks for looking cheers

Ahron
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22 January 2012 at 12:18
ahron, that looks great ~ this summer, i'd like to try this using flathead cherries from montana.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote AK1 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11 April 2012 at 14:40
Interesting idea.

A Croatian thing was to make kruskovac(with pears), Slivovic(with plums). Tresnjavac made with cherries was not that common but was done occasionally.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Boilermaker Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11 April 2012 at 19:55
This sounds fantastic.  I have a bunch of sour cherries and this would be a great use for them.

In that big jar which looks to be at least a gallon how much sugar and how much cherries do you use?

I don't quite understand the remainder of the process.  Can you elaborate?  Thanks.



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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Margi Cintrano Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 April 2012 at 05:04
@ African Meat,
 
Wow ... Wonderful cocktail idea ...  
 
Thanks for posting.  
 
Have a nice wkend.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote KateC Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 April 2012 at 15:48
This intrigues me because the fruit and sugar are fermented together before the spirirts are added so I did a little investigating....not to step on your toes AfricanMeat! Smile
 
 
There's very little info online about this technique but here's the skinny:
 

"Here is how she told me to make the Visinata: Put 2 cups of cherries in a really large jar with a cup of sugar. Do not pit the cherries, she warned, because the pits are critical to the fermentation process. Let the fruit and sugar ferment for 2 weeks. Then add vodka. Amount? “A lot.” Now let the whole thing macerate until September. The cherries can be pitted and dipped in chocolate to make bonbons. Or the fruit can be ground up and mixed with biscuits to make bonbons.

I wieghed the fruit and 2 cups of it weighed about a pound. So the formula is 1 lb cherries, 8 ounces sugar, “a lot” of vodka. (Note: I intended to add 2 cups of vodka, but I only had about 1 2/3 cups of vodka left in the bottle, so that is what I used)."

IMG_0694This quote came from: http://pragmaticattic.wordpress.com/2009/07/19/homemade-sour-cherry-brandy-visinata-or-vishniak/

It's a long blog post with 2 additional pages of updates as she takes us through the whole process with photos. V-e-r-y Interesting!  :) Kate
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote AK1 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 April 2012 at 18:28
This is really starting to interest me.  One of my neighbours makes it every year, and leaves the bottles sitting on his upstairs balcony in the sun for ages.

I think I may try it.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Margi Cintrano Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 April 2012 at 02:46
Kate,
 
WOW ... cool ... It is cherry season here in Spain ... awesome idea ... I just called the Vet, to ask if he could pick up a few of bottles of Vodka:  one Absolute Swedish, One Polish and One Russian on the way home ...
 
Kindest. regards.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote africanmeat Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20 April 2012 at 09:59
Originally posted by Boilermaker Boilermaker wrote:

This sounds fantastic.  I have a bunch of sour cherries and this would be a great use for them.

In that big jar which looks to be at least a gallon how much sugar and how much cherries do you use?

I don't quite understand the remainder of the process.  Can you elaborate?  Thanks.



 
It is easy i put 2 to 1
2 parts cherry 1 sugar
after 3 weeks or after the sugar dissolved in to cherry syrup  filter and  pour the syrup in to a big bottle and add vodka 1:1 cup syrup to 1 cup vodka.
now add vodka to the cherries that are left in the jar.
 now just forget it in a dark place. longer it sits better it gets.
Ahron
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Boilermaker Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22 April 2012 at 18:16
Originally posted by africanmeat africanmeat wrote:

Originally posted by Boilermaker Boilermaker wrote:

This sounds fantastic.  I have a bunch of sour cherries and this would be a great use for them.

In that big jar which looks to be at least a gallon how much sugar and how much cherries do you use?

I don't quite understand the remainder of the process.  Can you elaborate?  Thanks.



 
It is easy i put 2 to 1
2 parts cherry 1 sugar
after 3 weeks or after the sugar dissolved in to cherry syrup  filter and  pour the syrup in to a big bottle and add vodka 1:1 cup syrup to 1 cup vodka.
now add vodka to the cherries that are left in the jar.
 now just forget it in a dark place. longer it sits better it gets.
 
Excellent!  Thanks for the clarification, this is awesome and I'm I'm going to make it.Thumbs Up
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote ChrisFlanders Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 23 April 2012 at 05:46

Looks and sounds fantastic, Ahron! Since a little while I found 94% alcohol for making my herbal tinctures and for purposes like this, but I never made any liqueur like yours yet. I've read recipes in the past, where they start by macerating the fruit in this nearly-pure alcohol and afterward they add a sugar syrup to reach an acceptable alcohol level. I completely understand the reverse procedure you use with your sour cherries. I'd love to taste that!

Reminds me somewhat of the "Mon Chéri" bonbons, made by the Italian Ferrero if I'm not mistaken,  filled with a cherry and thick syrup... irresistable! I'm already dreaming of a scoop of your cherries over some vanilla ice cream, droooool!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote africanmeat Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 23 April 2012 at 10:21
Originally posted by ChrisBelgium ChrisBelgium wrote:

Looks and sounds fantastic, Ahron! Since a little while I found 94% alcohol for making my herbal tinctures and for purposes like this, but I never made any liqueur like yours yet. I've read recipes in the past, where they start by macerating the fruit in this nearly-pure alcohol and afterward they add a sugar syrup to reach an acceptable alcohol level. I completely understand the reverse procedure you use with your sour cherries. I'd love to taste that!

Reminds me somewhat of the "Mon Chéri" bonbons, made by the Italian Ferrero if I'm not mistaken,  filled with a cherry and thick syrup... irresistable! I'm already dreaming of a scoop of your cherries over some vanilla ice cream, droooool!
 
wow 94% alcohol this is rocket fuel.
yup you are right the cherry liqueur gos yummy with vanilla ice cream.Wink
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Boilermaker Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 23 April 2012 at 22:00
I have a batch of this going, can't wait to try it after it has aged for a few years, but I'll try it young for sure.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Boilermaker Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 25 April 2012 at 17:37
I just strained off the juice an added one cup of 190 proof grain alcohol to 2 cups of juice and put that back in the bottle and then poured the remainder of the bottle of alcohol into the remaining juice and cherries, I ended up with 8 cups of strained juice so I figure the finished product will be about 25-30% alcohol.  I tasted it and it tastes fantastic with an alcoholic bite that I suspect will mellow with age.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote africanmeat Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26 April 2012 at 08:02
Originally posted by Boilermaker Boilermaker wrote:

I just strained off the juice an added one cup of 190 proof grain alcohol to 2 cups of juice and put that back in the bottle and then poured the remainder of the bottle of alcohol into the remaining juice and cherries, I ended up with 8 cups of strained juice so I figure the finished product will be about 25-30% alcohol.  I tasted it and it tastes fantastic with an alcoholic bite that I suspect will mellow with age.

now is the hard part let it be for long time it will be worthwhile  to wait.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Boilermaker Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 April 2012 at 20:35
Originally posted by africanmeat africanmeat wrote:

Originally posted by Boilermaker Boilermaker wrote:

I just strained off the juice an added one cup of 190 proof grain alcohol to 2 cups of juice and put that back in the bottle and then poured the remainder of the bottle of alcohol into the remaining juice and cherries, I ended up with 8 cups of strained juice so I figure the finished product will be about 25-30% alcohol.  I tasted it and it tastes fantastic with an alcoholic bite that I suspect will mellow with age.

now is the hard part let it be for long time it will be worthwhile  to wait.
 
I bottled it tonight into 3 vodka bottles.  The cherries and one fifth (750 ml) of 95% grain alcohol made three fifths of liqueur at 31.7% alcohol, probably closer to a flavored vodka than a cordial but tasty nonetheless.  The flavor is awesome and I can't wait to try it with a year or two of age on it.  We have a Montmorency cherry tree from which the cherries I made it were harvested and we usually get tons of cherries each spring so I'll definetely be making this every spring.     
 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote ChrisFlanders Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29 April 2012 at 06:03
That's quite a result and the perfect alcohol level. Need anyone to empty your bottles? I'm available.
You don't happen to have a wallnut tree too? The italians make a similar dark liqueur from the still unripe nuts, bolsters included , that they remove from the trees somewhere end of june. The walnut bolsters color the liquid very dark brown-ish. The procedure is the same as making your cherry liqueur. They do leave the wallnuts macerating in the grain alcohol in the hot sun for a few months. It's called nocino or so.
 
BTW, what did you do with the cherries? I know some make this cherry liqueur including the cherries and leave them in, mostly they put them in large "pharmacists" jars where they can scoop the cherries out easily. The cherries+ booze liqueur keeps forever,... fantastic to be eaten as such but delicious in desserts. Maybe Sacher torte rings a bell? Chocolate and cherries; a combo from the darkest part of heaven where they hide the foodies.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Boilermaker Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29 April 2012 at 20:46
Chris,

We do have black walnut trees on our property in Indiana, perhaps I should try that too.  As far as the cherries, I have been baking them into muffins and just eating them, delicious both ways.  I may do something with chocolate as well.  This liqueur is just outstanding with a super cherry flavor, it's already one of the best cordial type drinks that I have ever tasted and I can only imagine how good it will be as it ages.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote africanmeat Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 30 April 2012 at 09:45
Originally posted by Boilermaker Boilermaker wrote:

Chris,

We do have black walnut trees on our property in Indiana, perhaps I should try that too.  As far as the cherries, I have been baking them into muffins and just eating them, delicious both ways.  I may do something with chocolate as well.  This liqueur is just outstanding with a super cherry flavor, it's already one of the best cordial type drinks that I have ever tasted and I can only imagine how good it will be as it ages.
 
I am geld it came out good ,if you got any cherries left in alcohol leave it in and it will be good for cocktails or ice creme.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Boilermaker Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 30 April 2012 at 21:25
Originally posted by africanmeat africanmeat wrote:

Originally posted by Boilermaker Boilermaker wrote:

Chris,

We do have black walnut trees on our property in Indiana, perhaps I should try that too.  As far as the cherries, I have been baking them into muffins and just eating them, delicious both ways.  I may do something with chocolate as well.  This liqueur is just outstanding with a super cherry flavor, it's already one of the best cordial type drinks that I have ever tasted and I can only imagine how good it will be as it ages.
 
I am geld it came out good ,if you got any cherries left in alcohol leave it in and it will be good for cocktails or ice creme.


I used some of the cherries to bake muffins but had a quart Mason jar full of cherries left which I covered with 80 proof vodka.  Yum!


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