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Colcannon

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Hoser View Drop Down
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    Posted: 04 March 2011 at 02:53
With St. Patty's Day rapidly approaching, I thought it might be a good time to post up this recipe that I got from the food network. You can use leftover corned beef if you wish, rather than ham or bacon.
This is a terrific dish for the holiday, or any day.

Colcannon

Ingredients
  • 3 pounds potatoes, scrubbed
  • 2 sticks butter
  • 1 1/4 cups hot milk
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 head cabbage, cored and finely shredded
  • 1 (1-pound) piece ham or bacon, cooked the day before
  • 4 scallions, finely chopped
  • Chopped parsley leaves, for garnish

Directions

Steam the potatoes in their skins for 30 minutes. Peel them using a knife and fork. Chop with a knife before mashing. Mash thoroughly to remove all the lumps. Add 1 stick of butter in pieces. Gradually add hot milk, stirring all the time. Season with a few grinds of black pepper.

Boil the cabbage in unsalted water until it turns a darker color. Add 2 tablespoons butter to tenderize it. Cover with lid for 2 minutes. Drain thoroughly before returning it to the pan. Chop into small pieces.

Put the ham in a large saucepan and cover with water. Bring to the boil and simmer for 45 minutes until tender. Drain. Remove any fat and chop into small pieces.

Add cabbage, scallions, and ham to mashed potatoes, stirring them in gently.

Serve in individual soup plates. Make an indentation on the top by swirling a wooden spoon. Put 1 tablespoon of butter into each indentation. Sprinkle with parsley.



Go ahead...play with your food!
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TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 March 2011 at 08:48
that looks like something i would love to try, dave - a great use of "peasant" ingredients and a wonderful picture.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote kiwi Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 March 2011 at 23:28
OK, surely a "stick" isn't an actual unit, right?
kai time!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Hoser Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 March 2011 at 03:58
Originally posted by kiwi kiwi wrote:

OK, surely a "stick" isn't an actual unit, right?


LOL   I didn't even notice that "stick " reference Richard...my apologies.
one stick of butter (4 oz) would equal 113 grams.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote kiwi Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06 March 2011 at 00:16
Oh wow! Never even heard of that one. Did butter used to be sold in 4 oz sticks in the States or something?
kai time!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Hoser Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06 March 2011 at 03:13
Originally posted by kiwi kiwi wrote:

Oh wow! Never even heard of that one. Did butter used to be sold in 4 oz sticks in the States or something?


It still is Richard.
A one pound container is almost always separated into four individually wrapped 4 ounce sticks.
You can find it either salted or unsalted, and sometimes in 8 two ounce sticks, but it is very difficult to find in 1 pound blocks that have not been cut into different sizes.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06 March 2011 at 08:09
How is butter sold in NZ? In one-pound tubs? That's a fascinating little detail we do not normally think about. Didn't it used to be sold like that here back in our parents' time? All my life i've only seen 4 oz sticks unless one made the butter themselves. Food service, you get single, one pound blocks though.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Melissa Mead Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06 March 2011 at 09:21
I haven't seen tub butter in years! My parents used to buy Ayershire tub butter. (My Grandpa was an Ayershire farmer.) Best. Butter. Ever.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote kiwi Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06 March 2011 at 16:54
Haha, think about that one, rivet. We don't use pounds LOL But yeah, you're pretty close, 500g blocks. Softened butter comes in tubs. We're pretty lucky with the quality of our dairy here. The whole country is more or less a great big dairy farm, all free range. There was a massive uproar a while back when some farmer applied for resource consent to do a feed lot type thing. It was denied.
kai time!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Boilermaker Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06 March 2011 at 19:19
This dish looks so good.  I have heard of it but never tried it but I am putting it on the to-try list.Thumbs Up  Thanks for posting it Dave.  
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gracoman Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 August 2013 at 17:05
Q: What could possibly be better than Colcannon?
A: Nothing under the sun

I came to post Colcannon and I was both surprised and pleased that it was already here!

Hoser, I've been using that exact same recipe for years.  Colcannon is a glorious wonder of simplicity I could not possibly wait an entire year for.  Don't wait for St Paddy's day to assemble this remarkable peasant dish.  I'm always on the lookout for an excuse.  Real Irish butter from Irish grass fed cows is an ingredient worth seeking out.

I've been singing praises of Colcannon for years but it's difficult to make people understand unless I make and serve it to them.  After all, "cabbage, or even worse, kale mixed with potatoes?".  

You and I know though don't we.

Colcannon with ham, green onions and cabbage

The only thing I can add is I like to fry the leftovers if I'm lucky enough to have any.

Plated

Unbelievable.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 August 2013 at 18:55
I'd always thought, and made, colcannon strictly with cabbage. On two different occasions last year, while I was working at Fort Boonesborough, we had Irish ladies visiting. In both cases I asked them for their recipes, and both of them said they made it with kale.

I'd not heard that before. And it is, of course, delicious made that way.

As it turns out, both of those visitors were from Dublin, and I began to wonder if cabbage/kale was a country/city thing. Or maybe just a Dublin thing.

I'm still wondering.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gracoman Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 August 2013 at 19:41
The longer I hang at this wonderful forum the more I learn about it's residents.  Many of you will know this but I will bring it up for this who do not.  

There are different kinds of kale and for those experimenting, Dinosaur , also known as Tuscan kale, Tuscan cabbage, Italian kale, cavolo nero, black kale, flat back cabbage, palm tree kale, orblack Tuscan palm is mildest in flavor.  Start by playing with that one.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gracoman Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 August 2013 at 19:54
Originally posted by HistoricFoodie HistoricFoodie wrote:

.......I began to wonder if cabbage/kale was a country/city thing. Or maybe just a Dublin thing.

I'm still wondering.
I have no basis for what I am about to say other than life and historical study experience.  

Historically, the wealthy have enjoyed the finer things in life.  Kale has a nutritional profile far superior to cabbage.  I would tend to believe the wealthier citizens of Ireland had their colcannon with kale.  The peasantry with cabbage.

Dublin gets my vote.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Effigy Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13 August 2013 at 02:31
Ummm...
I never knew it had a 'name'
In my house it's called 'boy-filler'. I always cook twice as much mash as needed at night so I can make this for the boy's breakfast and lunch boxes. I use cabbage, I never thought to use kale. I also use any other left over green vegetables I have in the fridge at the time, is that heresy? I sometimes use flaked tuna if I don't have ham or bacon at the time Shocked 
Resident Peasant
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Hoser Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13 August 2013 at 03:05
It truly is peasant food at it's best. I must try the kale variation as I have never heard of that one before. Kale is very prevalent in the local area as it is used in Portuguese soup.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gracoman Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13 August 2013 at 06:40
 
Originally posted by Effigy Effigy wrote:

Ummm...
I never knew it had a 'name'
In my house it's called 'boy-filler'. ...
Thanks for the morning belly laugh LOL
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Margi Cintrano Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13 August 2013 at 07:41


Graccoman.

Thank you posting .. surely, it could be an English versión of a French Quiche without the pastry ...

I am a big fan of cavollo when in Italian season.

As Hoser, mentioned, Portugal and Italy are big growers, of Cavallo, black cabbage so certainly does have mainland Mediterranean roots.

The Romans occupied The British Isles, France, Portugal, Spain and Italy and Greece for numerous years. ( 600 years )


Lovely pictorial too.

Have lovely summer.
Margaux Cintrano.

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Gourmet´s Choice - Time Out In Spain ...

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14 August 2013 at 08:53
This one is absolutely on deck when the colder weather hits - with cabbage, for me!
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