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Dansk Frikadeller

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TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
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    Posted: 28 February 2014 at 21:42

Dansk Frikadeller

Danish Meat Patties


From Time/Life's Foods of the World - The Cooking of Scandinavia, 1968:

Quote To make 8 to 10 patties:

1/2 pound boneless veal

1/2 pound boneless pork

1 medium onion, coarsely chopped or grated (1/2 cup)

3 tablespoons flour

1.5 cups club soda

1 egg, well beaten

1 teaspoon salt

1/4 teaspoon pepper

4 tablespoons butter

2 tablespoons vegetable oil


Put the veal, pork and chopped onion twice through the finest blade of a meat grinder, or have the butcher grind the meats together and then grate in the onion yourself.

In a large mixing bowl, vigorously beat the flour into the ground meat mixture with a wooden spoon, or use an electric mixer equipped with a pastry arm or paddle. Gradually beat in the club soda, a few tablespoons at a time, and continue to beat until the meat is light and fluffy. Now thoroughly beat in the egg, salt and pepper. Cover the bowl with aluminum foil or plastic wrap and refrigerate for 1 hour; this will make the meat mixture firmer and easier to handle.

Shape the mixture into oblongs about 4 inches long, 2 inches wide and 1 inch thick. Melt the butter and oil over high heat in a heavy 10- to 12-inch skillet. When the foam subsides, lower the heat to moderate and add the meat patties, 4 or 5 at a time, taking care not to crowd them. Cook about 6 to 8 minutes on each side, turning the patties with a wide spatula or two wooden spoons. When they are a rich mahogany brown, remove them from the pan and set them aside on a heated platter. Continue with the remaining patties. Because frikadeller contain pork, they should never be served rare. To be certain they are cooked through, puncture one with the tip of a small knife. The juices should run clear and show no tinge of pink.

Frikadeller are traditionally accompanied by boiled potatoes and syltede rødbeder (pickled beets), agurkesalat (cucumber salad) or red cabbage.
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africanmeat View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote africanmeat Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 March 2014 at 13:04
Thanks they look yummy.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Melissa Mead Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03 March 2018 at 10:57
Finally got some ground pork! I've been wanting to try this for months.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03 March 2018 at 11:13
Let us know how it goes!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Melissa Mead Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03 March 2018 at 19:25

Well, that was...interesting.

 I hadn't made this recipe sooner because it calls for grinding the meat twice, and I didn't have a grinder or full-sized food processor. Then my parents gave me a really nice food processor for Christmas, and this week I found ground pork and thought "Hooray! Now I can make Frikadeller!"

So I ground up the meat nice and fine (Maybe too fine? Maybe I got carried away with my new toy?) and for once in my life actually followed the recipe. I thought it seemed to take an awful lot of club soda, but hey, the recipe said the mixture would firm up after an hour in the fridge. So I put it in the fridge and went grocery shopping.

Came back about 2 hours later. No way was I forming this stuff into oblongs, or any other shape. It had the consistency of lumpy pudding. But I tried frying a blob. It disintegrated into greasy crumbles. Tried again. Same thing. Gave up and poured (yes, poured) the whole mess into the pan and let it boil off the excess liquid. Somehow, despite all the water and grease, it kept trying to stick to the bottom of the pan. So I kept scraping and stirring until most of the liquid was gone.

Now I have a bowlful of soft, meaty, greasy crumbles. They're actually pretty tasty, especially with a dollop of dill mustard, but has anyone tried making this recipe? Any idea where I went wrong?



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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 March 2018 at 07:51
Melissa, your problem stemmed from using the food processor, especially with already-ground meat.

What happens is that it emulsifies the meat, turning it liquidy.

When grinding meat in a food processor it is crucial that you use the pulse button. And, even then, it's easy to go overboard.

On the other hand, using a meat grinder (had you had one) and grinding whole meats twice, is a basic technique in sausage making.

All that aside, congrats on the new toy. There are numerous things a food processor is ideal for, and I'm sure you'll get lots of use out of it. But there is a learning curve involved.
But we hae meat and we can eat
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Melissa Mead Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 March 2018 at 08:31
Thanks!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Margi Cintrano Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 March 2018 at 15:09
Ron and  Brook, 

I think 1.5 cups of club soda for 1 kilo of ground meat does sound like alot of liquid ..

Could you please recheck récipe and confirm .. 

Note: I would do this without a Food Processor -- the traditional way ..  

I made a wonderful meatloaf Saturday morning and I never put any liquid in the ground meat ..  

So, this is why I am asking ..  

Thanks.   
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 March 2018 at 10:26
I've been planning on doing this one for a while, and will definitely need to do so.

As for the amount of liquid, I cannot say for sure at this time. I do know that ground meat can absorb a lot of it, but considering the liquid in the onion, it could certainly be a little too much. My first instinct is that the food processor is the culprit, as Brook says - they can be tricky, with meat!

If I were going to do so without a food grinder, I'd probably just go with whatever "regular grind" came with the meat. If the butcher would comply, It might be worth a try to ask him/her if it could be double-ground.

Melissa, I hope you are able to give this another shot! In the meantime, I'll also give it a try, when I can. It's a neat-looking dish, and I like the simple flavor profile, which always seems to be quintessentially perfect for Scandinavian cooking.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 March 2018 at 11:47
One thing that strikes me: It must be nice to be a food stylist with a big budget. I mean, who cuts a cast-iron skillet in half for the sake of food art?
But we hae meat and we can eat
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote pitrow Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 March 2018 at 14:37
Interesting. the Dutch have a similar recipe, frikandel(len), that's almost the same except a few more spices and shaped into skinless sausage links and deep fried.

I might have to give both versions a whirl and do a comparison.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Melissa Mead Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 March 2018 at 17:38
I had the actual book in front of me, so I don't think we have a typo here.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote pitrow Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06 March 2018 at 10:53
Originally posted by Melissa Mead Melissa Mead wrote:

I had the actual book in front of me, so I don't think we have a typo here.


probably not, but more likely either a typo in the book itself or a poorly researched recipe.

I've looked at a handful of frikandeller recipes online and most seem to favor anywhere between 1/4 cup and 1 cup of liquid per pound of meat. And that liquid is usually either all milk(or half-and-half) or a 50/50 split of milk(or half-and-half) and seltzer water. I did see one that said 1 to 1.5 cup of milk for a pound of meat, so it maybe that we're not too far off. One description did say the mixture should be very wet, but not dripping.

The other thing that this recipe seems to be lacking is breadcrumbs. All the recipes I looked at had breadcrumbs, oatmeal, or some other binder in them that would help absorb the liquid.

Might be we need to do a little experimenting with this one to get it right.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06 March 2018 at 11:27
I noticed that too, Mike - the only binder I saw was the flour, along with the egg, of course.
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