Foods of the World Forum Homepage
Forum Home Forum Home > Food Groups > Grains, Breads and Baking
  New Posts New Posts RSS Feed - Dill-Cheese Bread
  FAQ FAQ  Forum Search   Events   Register Register  Login Login

This site is completely supported by donations; there are no corporate sponsors. We would be honoured if you would consider a small donation, to be used exclusively for forum expenses.



Thank you, from the Foods of the World Forums!

Dill-Cheese Bread

 Post Reply Post Reply
Author
Message
TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar

Joined: 25 January 2010
Location: Chinook, MT
Status: Offline
Points: 8936
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: Dill-Cheese Bread
    Posted: 01 February 2010 at 16:26
I received this wonderful bread recipe from Mrs. John Rivera. Mrs. Tas isn't a huge fan of dill, so we usually make this with chives and have excellent results. I have tried it both ways and really, really like this quick and easy bread. The smell that fills the house is phenomenal!
 

Dill-Cheese Bread

 

It's written as "dill-cheese" bread, but I often use chives in place of dill. A person can also use sun-dried tomato and basil or oregano. The absolute key with this bread recipe is to use the little tiny dehydrated onion bits, NOT chopped fresh onion. The reason for this is because fresh onion has way too much moisture and will make mushy pockets in your bread. The onion flakes soak up moisture and expand just right.

 

1 PKG Active dry yeast, not the super quick kind. Regular.
1/4 Cup warm water
2 TBSP sugar
1 Cup regular cottage cheese (4% milkfat at minimum, non of the 2% or skim stuff~ doesn't work right)
1 TBSP butter
1 TBSP dry minced onion (fresh onion releases too much water- ruins the bread)
2 TSP dill seed
1 TSP salt
1/4 TSP baking soda
1 Large Egg
2 1/2 Cups white flour
Kosher salt and butter for later

Soften yeast in warm water. In a saucepan, heat cottage cheese to lukewarm, add sugar, butter, minced onion, dill seed, salt, baking soda, and egg.

Add yeast to mixture and gradually stir in flour to make a stiff dough. Blend well, cover and allow to rise until double about 50-60 minutes.

Stir down dough, then place in a well-greased (butter, pam, don't use oil) baking pan. We use a glass pyrex bowl about 9 inches in diameter at the top. Holds maybe 2 qts max?

Cover and let rise agin till double. Bake at 350 F for 40 - 50 minutes or until loaf sounds hollow when tapped. Remove from pan immediately. Brush top with butter and sprinkle kosher salt on top.

Excellent either straight from the oven or cooled down. Perfect for cold winter's day soups and stews.

If you are a visitor and like what you see, please click here and join the discussions in our community!
Back to Top
Sponsored Links


Back to Top
TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar

Joined: 25 January 2010
Location: Chinook, MT
Status: Offline
Points: 8936
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 February 2010 at 07:06
here are a couple of "finished" pix:
 

Back to Top
TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar

Joined: 25 January 2010
Location: Chinook, MT
Status: Offline
Points: 8936
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 March 2010 at 14:53
just to show how easy this bread is, my #2 son made it yesterday all by himself. he chose to use chives rather than dill, and it was all good.
 
here's the goods - yep, it really is this easy!
 
 
here's the dough before rising:
 
 
it looked a little dense, and i am guessing that the "mixture" was a bit too warm when it was added to the yeast. it didn't rise quite as high as my loaf above, but the final product tasted great and the texture was not heavy at all.
 
here's it is in the pyrex baking dish sprayed with extra-virgin olive oil and ready to bake at 350 degrees:
 
 
and about 45 minutes later, out of the oven it came:
 
 
as you can see, it looks a little dense and also a little dry. no explanation for this, but it smelled wonderful and was not overly-hard or dense. the internal temperature was 205 degrees and the bottom thumped when we tapped it, so it was done just right, it just hadn't risen, possibly due to the temp of the mixture or not enough time rising.
 
and a picture of it when sliced fairly thickly, the better to sop up the juices from the carbonade flamande that we had that night for supper!
 
 
even with whatever went wrong, this bread is absolutely foolproof. it tasted great and the little chunks of cottage cheese melted into the bread for rich goodness that one must taste to appreciate. we are finding that we prefer large-curd cottage cheese for this, but there isn't a single thing wrong with small-curd!
 
i hope this post inspires a few folks to give this a try. if you do, post your results!
 
[edit] ok, after re-reading the instructions (amazing how that simple action helps!), i see we didn't allw much time at all for the second rising. this is evident in the picture of the bread right before it went into the oven.
 
will remember next time!
 
Back to Top
Hoser View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar

Joined: 06 February 2010
Location: Cumberland, RI
Status: Offline
Points: 3387
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Hoser Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 March 2010 at 05:28
I will definitely be trying this one....easy to do, and looks fantastic! Clap
I put this in my cookbook program already...can't wait to try it.
Go ahead...play with your food!
Back to Top
Melissa Mead View Drop Down
Master Chef
Master Chef


Joined: 17 July 2010
Location: Albany, NY, USA
Status: Offline
Points: 1051
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Melissa Mead Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 08 March 2011 at 18:48
Oo, nice! Do you suppose it would translate to a bread machine?
Back to Top
TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar

Joined: 25 January 2010
Location: Chinook, MT
Status: Offline
Points: 8936
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 08 March 2011 at 19:02
it should, melissa, but to be honest i don't know how that translation would go - perhaps rivet or kiqi might be able to elaborate?
 
for what it's worth, this one is so easy, it hardly needs kneading at all ~
If you are a visitor and like what you see, please click here and join the discussions in our community!
Back to Top
Guests View Drop Down
Guest Group
Guest Group
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09 March 2011 at 07:33
Originally posted by Melissa Mead Melissa Mead wrote:

Oo, nice! Do you suppose it would translate to a bread machine?
 
Not sure how much you would want to translate into the bread machine. I know you would still have to melt the cheese in a pot on the stove and then go from there...
Back to Top
Hoser View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar

Joined: 06 February 2010
Location: Cumberland, RI
Status: Offline
Points: 3387
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Hoser Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09 March 2011 at 13:47
Originally posted by Rivet Rivet wrote:

Originally posted by Melissa Mead Melissa Mead wrote:

Oo, nice! Do you suppose it would translate to a bread machine?
 
Not sure how much you would want to translate into the bread machine. I know you would still have to melt the cheese in a pot on the stove and then go from there...


John...do you think you might be able to choose a very soft cheese, grate it, and put it in the bread machine with everything else?
Maybe a soft gruyere or muenster? something that you know would melt with the heat of baking?
Go ahead...play with your food!
Back to Top
TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar

Joined: 25 January 2010
Location: Chinook, MT
Status: Offline
Points: 8936
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09 March 2011 at 13:52
after making the bread a few times, i see what john is talking about. it's not so much about melting the cheese, it's more about heating the first few ingredients (minus the flour) and turning them all into a liquid. the cottage cheese doesn't really melt so much as meld into the other ingredients.
 
i am guessing a person could do that step on the stovetop, then add it to the flour and start the rbead machine from there.
 
only way to know for sure is to try - heck, even if it doesn't come out perfectly, i might it would be a good-tastng mistake ~ melissa, why don't you give us a shot and let us know if it works?
If you are a visitor and like what you see, please click here and join the discussions in our community!
Back to Top
Guests View Drop Down
Guest Group
Guest Group
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09 March 2011 at 14:46
Dave, I think Ron has hit the nail on the head....it is not so much the melting as making a liquidy combination of flavors to which the flour is then added, which not only gives it the bread's body, but incorporates those same flavors throughout.
 
I see no reason why not to try grating a soft cheese, but then you will end up with little lumps of cheesey oiliness in your bread. Believe me I've done that before, just not in a bread machine.
 
If I am correct, a bread machine only takes the "kneading" portion out of the way, really. It simply has a timer for the rising etcertera, and the ingredients for "bread machine" bread are goosed to make things "happen faster".
 
Again, I am doubtful it would come out anywhere near the same, though it could be excellent on it's own in that new fashion.
 
Check out KidLit's other cheese bread (which is even better, as far as I am concerned), Ron's tutorial on making Beer-Cheese Bread HERE and I think the recipe and the tutorial pics demonstrate that these breads are more than just bread-with-cheese-in-it;  they are truly cheese-bread in the sense that the cheese is incorporated into the dough as an emulsion-type.
 
Don't mean to get all complicated here, just trying to clarify. By taking the steps of these particular breads, the entire bread takes on a cheese flavor with no visible cheese in it. By adding cheese to a bread machine and its operation, the result will be bits of cheese interspersed in bread.
 
Again, that can be delicious, just not the same.
Back to Top
Melissa Mead View Drop Down
Master Chef
Master Chef


Joined: 17 July 2010
Location: Albany, NY, USA
Status: Offline
Points: 1051
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Melissa Mead Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09 March 2011 at 15:18
Having just tried Gruyere for the first time a couple of weeks ago, I can think of worse fates than having lumps of it in bread. ;)

Thanks for all the help!
Back to Top
TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar

Joined: 25 January 2010
Location: Chinook, MT
Status: Offline
Points: 8936
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09 March 2011 at 15:24
give it a go and let us know what happens!
If you are a visitor and like what you see, please click here and join the discussions in our community!
Back to Top
Melissa Mead View Drop Down
Master Chef
Master Chef


Joined: 17 July 2010
Location: Albany, NY, USA
Status: Offline
Points: 1051
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Melissa Mead Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09 March 2011 at 15:28
I'm carless at the moment. No experiments for me until I've got my wheels back.
Back to Top
jdonly1 View Drop Down
Cook
Cook
Avatar

Joined: 12 February 2010
Location: Australia
Status: Offline
Points: 180
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote jdonly1 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10 March 2011 at 00:14
Mate you would put a lot of bakers to shame,nice job

Back to Top
 Post Reply Post Reply
  Share Topic   

Forum Jump Forum Permissions View Drop Down



This page was generated in 0.063 seconds.