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Dolsot Bibimbap

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gracoman View Drop Down
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    Posted: 11 December 2017 at 14:41
There are two basic methods for serving Korean Bibimbap.  Dolsot (stone bowl) Bibimbap (mixed rice) and the other more common way which is served in a metal or other type of bowl.  Dolsot was the traditional method used at the royal table but this disappeared during the Japanese occupation.  Korean restaurants serve dolsot but most Korean households will use a metal bowl.

Granite bowls are pre heated in a 400ºF oven, a bit of toasted sesame oil is added, then the rice and side dishes are added all topped with a raw egg yolk.  The bowls are then placed over a flame that heats the bowls for several minutes so the rice sizzles and crackles forming a delicious crust.  The bowls are brought to the table so hot the sizzling continues for several minutes after they are delivered to your delighted guests.  It is hot enough to cook the egg and any sliced raw meat that may have been added. The bowl keeps everything piping hot for the entire meal.

Break open the yolk first so it runs down into the rice making it creamier.  Stir it all together along with the Korean gochujang hot pepper paste or gochujang sauce that is sure to be included.  The egg and meat will cook inside the hot bowl.

Koreans use this dish as a stand alone and as a way to use up leftovers. 

I picked up several Korean Dolsots.  The bowl on the right has been seasoned.  Notice the wooden trivets that are placed underneath the bowls to protect your table from the heat.  I live close by to this H Mart


Finished bibimbap has many side dishes that are placed on top of the rice before being mixed together.  These side dishes are individually cooked so different textures and flavors can shine on their own.  There are endless variations for bibimbap ingredients but a few are always present. The gochujang sauce, Korean spinach, soybean sprouts, toasted sesame oil, and an egg will always be included.  I used spinach, English cucumber, carrot, soybean sprouts, zucchini, red bell pepper, sliced marinated beef tenderloin, gochujang, green onion, and toasted sesame seeds.  Pictures are Korean stainless steel flat chopsticks and a stainless long handles bibimbap spoon.  Bibimbab is eaten with a spoon.
 

Another Dolsot Bibimbap


Delicious!!!


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TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 December 2017 at 08:37
I have to say, that really looks good - and that is some beautiful presentation and photography, as well! I like the idea of the bowl doing the final cooking, then keeping the food warm.

One of our local restaurants is owned by a Korean family - from Korea - but they only have one Korean dish on the menu (Bulgogi)...two, if you count the Kimchee that it is served with. This is a waste, in my opinion; especially because the Bulgogi is really, really good. Our town is missing out on some wonderful food, and if it were up to me, we'd see a few more selections.


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gracoman View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gracoman Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 December 2017 at 18:35
It's hard for me to imagine a Korean restaurant without bibimbap on the menu but Korean food may be unknown where you are and it might not be prudent to try and sell such unknown dishes.

I've had a similar experience in the very small town in Maine where my family hails from.  A Chinese restaurant opened there some 20 years ago and the whole town was ga ga over the wonderful dishes coming out of that kitchen.  Well, we gave it a go after hearing the glowing reviews from the townsfolk.  Worst Chinese food I've ever had the misfortune to eat.  There was beef gravy poured over everything.  Beef gravy on stir fry that, believe me, had never see a wok, and beef gravy poured over the egg foo yung.  I guess you do what you gotta do to stay in business.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13 December 2017 at 04:12
That pretty much sums it up, Gman. Most Asians believe that most Americans do not have an appreciation of their cuisines. So they are adapted, often radically, to meet what the restaurant believes is Western taste.

Far too often they are right, unfortunately.

Don't know if you can remember the "Chinese" food of the 1950s % 60s. My God! Neon orange sauces, gross flavorings that have little to do with real Chinese cooking, and so forth. Yet, at that time, that's what the market would bear.

Anyway, getting back to your post, +1 on Ron's comments. Beautiful presentation.
But we hae meat and we can eat
And sae the Lord be thanket
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13 December 2017 at 12:57
gMan and Brook - correct on both counts, and it is unfortunate.

For what it's worth, their American" menu is good, and they offer several Chinese dishes as well; but, I would love to see more from Korea. it would definitely be refreshing and unique...certainly a draw from the larger college town of Havre (20 miles away).
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13 December 2017 at 19:13
Ron, have you thought of discussing this with them. If they've got that sort of eclectic menu, they might be open to the idea---if they can be shown that it would work.
But we hae meat and we can eat
And sae the Lord be thanket
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14 December 2017 at 08:39
I might do exactly that, Brook - I don't have much of a rapport with the family, but the proprietor and his wife are both very nice people, and a suggestion from an interested party would probably be well received.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gracoman Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 December 2017 at 11:34
Originally posted by HistoricFoodie HistoricFoodie wrote:

..... Most Asians believe that most Americans do not have an appreciation of their cuisines. So they are adapted, often radically, to meet what the restaurant believes is Western taste.
.......
I was raised in Connecticut so a good chunk of my misspent youth was lived out taking the train into the city.  That is what we all called New York city.  The city.  There is a BIG difference between food served in China Town and food served in Westernized Chinese restaurants.  Don't even look at a menu if you are feeling adventurous.  Just ask the chefs make you what they thing you should try.  It was always relatively inexpensive and we were never disappointed. 

Nothing can illustrate your point better.
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