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Dutch Sausages

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TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
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    Posted: 13 March 2019 at 13:29
I'm just posting this link to some preliminary information, for now:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Dutch_sausages

Mike (PitRow) and I got to talking abut this subject today, and I was surprised at how little information there is.
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pitrow View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote pitrow Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14 March 2019 at 09:29
It seems that Dutch sausages are overwhelmed by their neighbor Germany and it's sausage styles. It's certainly true that they share many styles, for example Dutch Leverworst and German Leberwurst are basically the same thing.

The few that stand out to me as typical "Dutch" are rookworst, which is a generic term for smoked (rook) sausage. I've found a few recipes around the web for this, but most people I ask reply along the lines of "why make it when you can just buy it in the store." It seems that home sausage making is a skill that's rapidly being lost in Holland.

The second that's uniquely Dutch, in my opinion, is frikandel. Basically it's a caseless hotdog, with it's own spice blend. Not quite as fully emulsified as an American hotdog but not too far off either.

In my searching on the web I've found a few resources in Dutch but I find I have little time to work on translating them so it often gets pushed to the back burner.

Mike
Life in PitRow - My often neglected, somewhat eccentric, occasionally outstanding blog
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TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 March 2019 at 09:44
I received this from Mike -

Originally posted by Mike Mike wrote:

Over the years I’ve come up with this list, I’m not sure if all of these are even valid types but at least it’s a starting point to further research. You’ll notice that a lot of the styles (leverworst, mettworst, knakworst, etc) are similar to German styles.

Rookworst
Frikandel
Drogeworst
Leverworst
Metworst
Verse worst
Bloedworst
Plockworst?
Gelderse kook worst
Knakworst
Paardenworst
Natte worstjes
Blinde vinken
Bockworst
Braadworst
Drentse kosterworst
Groninger metworst
Marcaboules
Boerenworst
Zoeltje
Rotterdamer worst
Fyske droege worst
Balkenbrij
Osseworst
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote pitrow Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 March 2019 at 09:16
I do have to note that not all of those above are strictly "Dutch", nor even some of them sausage in a traditional sense. For example, blinde vinken (Blind Finches) seems to be more of a Belgian thing than Dutch, but surely there's some overlap. And they are not a sausage like you'd think of them, they are basically a meatball wrapped in very thinly sliced/pounded veal.
Mike
Life in PitRow - My often neglected, somewhat eccentric, occasionally outstanding blog
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