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Englisch Pale Ale

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TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
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    Posted: 03 March 2017 at 14:02
NOTE - The recipe in the opening post has gone through some evolution and has been slightly modified. Scroll down for the final version!

Englisch Pale Ale


My next two brews will include a straight-up American Pale Ale and a straight-up English Pale Ale; this thread is for the English Pale Ale.

This project is inspired by my reading of the book, Beer Craft: A Simple Guide to Making Great Beer , which is written specifically for small-batch brewing:

https://www.amazon.com/Beer-Craft-Simple-Guide-Making/dp/1605291331/ref=cm_cr_arp_d_product_top?ie=UTF8

(Note - Please take a moment and click on the link above in order to learn more about this book from Amazon. By doing so, you help this site pay for itself!)

What I really like about this easy-to-read book is how it introduces you to a versatile spectrum of 10 beer styles (pale ale, brown ale, porter, stout, saison, wheat, pilsner, Scottish ale, abbey ale and barleywine), with good descriptions and back-stories to each style. The book also includes basic, no-frills recipes for perfecting the fundamentals of each style (with some suggestions for possible variations) as you progressively learn to become a well-rounded brewer. This, to me, is a stroke of genius, and this brew represents the beginning of my quest to brew my way through those 10 styles, along with a possible variation or two along the way, such as in the case of the Pale Ale (English and American).

My goal for this brew is for a stripped-down, non-complicated English Pale that reflects a few things about me. I am not consciously attempting to duplicate or emulate any commercial beer, but I do want it to conform to the style in general. I want this ale to be a malt-forward beer with good hop flavor and aroma, and a bitterness that is at the low end of the pale ale scale (see what I did there?). My name for the beer (Englisch) is a nod to my German roots, and the Maris Otter malt that I will be using is one that I have really come to admire. My chosen hops (Fuggle) were the hops that I used in the first beer that I ever brewed, and their characteristic flavour and aroma remain among my very favourites.

Here is the recipe that I have come up with, following the guidelines in the book for a basic Pale Ale:

Englisch
Pale Ale

By TasunkaWitko

1 gallon

OG - 1.060
FG - 1.013
ABV - 6.11%
IBUs - 31.40
SRM - 32.23


Fermentables

1.8 lb Maris Otter
0.2 lb Carastan 30/37L


60-Minute Mash @ 152 degrees

60-Minute Boil


Hops

0.15 oz Fuggle hops (5.9% AA) @ 60 minutes
0.25 oz Fuggle hops (5.9% AA) @ 15 minutes


Yeast

See below


I consider this recipe to be “in development,” and welcome input that will steer me toward a good English Pale Ale that is within my goals stated above.

Regarding the yeast, I am still not sure which would be “best” for what I am trying to do. I want it to be a dry yeast, and from what I have read, Windsor would not be a great choice. Based on that, Nottingham and S-04 are the top contenders, but I am very open to suggestions that will help me reach my goals.

I’ll be ordering the ingredients soon, and hope to brew this beer next week or the week after.

I have absolutely no experience with English Pale Ales, so I am looking forward to learning about them. As always, I welcome feedback and suggestions with this - I consider myself to be very much a beginning brewer, and batting ideas around is always good for learning new things. Please feel free to chime in, follow along or otherwise participate in the discussion.

More as it happens, etc. &c....

Ron
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gonefishin View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gonefishin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03 March 2017 at 15:04
    recipe looks good.  Are you using your spring water for this?  If I'm remembering correctly...it should go good with malt forward beers.  Can't wait to see how it comes along
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03 March 2017 at 15:10
Hi, Dan, and thanks! I edited/modified the hops schedule just slightly, to reflect the actual AAs for the hops, as written on the package.

Yes, I'll definitely be using the spring water for this, and as I recall, it should indeed be very good for this kind of beer. I'm looking forward to it!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09 March 2017 at 10:21
After some discussion, brain-storming and hashing around of ideas and concepts, I have modified the above recipe a little here is the final version that I will be attempting:

Quote
Englisch
Pale Ale

By TasunkaWitko

1 gallon

OG - 1.053
FG - 1.012
ABV - 5.37%
IBUs - 35.90
SRM - 8.28


Fermentables

1.9 lb Maris Otter (94.9%)
0.1 lb Carastan 30/37L (4.9%
0.05 oz. (1.42g) Simpson's Black Patent (0.2%)


60-Minute Mash @ 150 degrees

60-Minute Boil


Hops

6g Fuggle hops (5.9% AA) @ 60 minutes
5g Fuggle hops (5.9% AA) @ 15 minutes


Yeast

Safale S-04


Dry Hop

2g Fuggle Hops (5.9% AA) for up to 7 days after 7 days in primary.


The dry-hopping schedule is just a guess - I've never dry-hopped before! If there is any flaw in it, let me know and I will modify it.

My plan is to order any needed ingredients this coming Friday, and then brew this beer sometime during the week of 19-25 March.

If you're interested in seeing the discussion on how this recipe evolved, you can click here:

http://www.homebrewtalk.com/showthread.php?t=621412

That's it for now...we'll see how it goes!

Ron
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13 March 2017 at 08:31
I placed my order for the ingredients to brew this beer on Friday - I am expecting to brew this sometime during the week of 19-25 March.

Now, time to choose an image for the label!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote GarethM Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14 March 2017 at 01:39
It might need some work, but it will be fairly rare across there, I have sent it to you via FaceBook (it is too big to compress)

http://https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Warkworth_Castle

You also have a picture of Ullswater in the Lake District



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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14 March 2017 at 07:45
Aha! I saw those photos this morning!

Thank you, Gareth ~
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14 March 2017 at 10:53
Gareth - you've inspired me...twice over!

For the Pale Ale I will be brewing (which, as I understand it, would more properly be called a "Strong Bitter"), I will use Ullswater Lake and the surrounding hills. For the Northen English Brown Ale that I will try soon after, I'll use Warkworth Castle.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote GarethM Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 March 2017 at 03:47
You might find this interesting:http://baileysbeerblog.blogspot.co.uk/2013/02/half-and-half.html

When I was younger I used to drink "Mild and Bitter".  There are some good articles on Wikipedia about them both.  I remember one of my mates using this for one half
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barley_wine
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 March 2017 at 08:08
Hi, Gareth, and thanks for posting.

I've heard a little about both concepts before; it was good to read some more in-depth, especially the half-and-half article. Over here, we've heard of the "Black and Tan," but I was unaware of the others.

I stopped at a shop in Great Falls that "specializes" in bringing in beers from "all over." The selection was pretty good for some beers, but possibly lacking in others. For English styles, I was able to find a lot of stouts, porters and some more exotic selections; however, when it comes to "pale ales" or "bitters," I was only able to find Bass, which is advertised here as "The World's First Pale Ale." I bought a couple of bottles of it and will give it a try this coming weekend, most likely, in order to see what I'm getting into.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote GarethM Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 March 2017 at 08:17
The porters make a great winter ale, they tend to be rich and heavy.  They were the predecessors to stout.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 March 2017 at 08:24
I'm a fan of the porters ~ I've brewed a "chocolate maple" porter - which turned out really well - and another one that was a sort of chocolate and peanut butter thing, which didn't work out so well due to an over-abundance of oil in the finished product.

A brewery that is close by in Belt, Montana (Harvest Moon Brewing Company) brews what they call "Pig's Ass Porter," and I really like that one:



I've tried a few others, and have enjoyed them.

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