Foods of the World Forum Homepage
Forum Home Forum Home > Europe > The British Isles
  New Posts New Posts RSS Feed - EVE'S PUDDING
  FAQ FAQ  Forum Search   Events   Register Register  Login Login

This site is completely supported by donations; there are no corporate sponsors. We would be honoured if you would consider a small donation, to be used exclusively for forum expenses.



Thank you, from the Foods of the World Forums!

EVE'S PUDDING

 Post Reply Post Reply
Author
Message
English Rose View Drop Down
Cook's Assistant
Cook's Assistant
Avatar

Joined: 23 April 2018
Location: England
Status: Offline
Points: 83
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote English Rose Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: EVE'S PUDDING
    Posted: 04 May 2018 at 03:34

Mmmm, Lovely English Eve’s Pudding. One that was often served  as dessert with our school dinners. Definitely remember when it was on the menu, it came in a huge catering tin which the dinner ladies would cut off slices for us children, and serve with a scoop of Custard. I always made sure I smiled and said hello in the hope she would give me a larger slice, no such luck! She cut those slices with absolute precision.


What can I tell you about Eve’s Pudding. It is a typically English Pud, (also known as Mother Eve’s Pudding) It goes back to 1823, and would honestly say it was probably the forerunner for America’s Apple Cobbler, (LOL, got me tin helmet on!) but unlike the equally delicious Cobbler, Eve’s Puddings crowning glory is that on the base of apples is a light as air, lovely sponge-type topping.

Topping it off with hot Custard is an absolute requirement, this dessert goes hand in hand with custard as much as bacon and eggs or Laurel and Hardy!


Here then is the recipe for this wonderful British Pudding.


INGREDIENTS

1lb Granny Smiths, Bramleys or any apple you love to use, peeled cored and sliced thinly

Grated rind and juice of 1 lemon, (preferably unwaxed or organic)

6oz (¾ cup) sugar (separated into 2 equal amounts - about ⅓ plus 1 tablespoon)

3oz (¼ stick) butter

1 egg, beaten

4oz (1 cup minus 2 tablespoons) plain flour

1.½ teaspoons baking powder


METHOD

Preheat oven to 350F/180C/160C Fan/Gas 4.


Butter the inside of a pie dish or similar size baking dish.  Sieve the Flour and Baking powder into a bowl and mix together thoroughly.


Place the sliced apples into another bowl, add the lemon juice, lemon rind and half of the sugar (3oz) and stir well. Put the apple slices into the pie dish and set aside.


Cream the remaining (3oz) sugar and butter until light and fluffy. Beat in the egg and add the flour. Spread the mixture evenly over the apples.


Bake for 40 - 45 minutes until the sponge is firm and springy to the touch and golden brown.


Enjoy!


Live Life every day as though it is your last.
Back to Top
Sponsored Links


Back to Top
HistoricFoodie View Drop Down
Master Chef
Master Chef


Joined: 21 February 2012
Location: Kentucky
Status: Offline
Points: 4529
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 May 2018 at 06:45
Anyone who claims to dislike this one just doesn't know what good is.

Variations on the theme pre-date 1823 by quite a few years, going back at least to the 18th century. In our cookbook, "A Colonial Virginia Book of Cookery," for instance, we have a recipe for an apple "cake" that was adapted from a ca 1790 cookery manuscript.

But we hae meat and we can eat
And sae the Lord be thanket
Back to Top
gracoman View Drop Down
Chef
Chef


Joined: 09 August 2013
Status: Offline
Points: 714
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gracoman Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 May 2018 at 07:19
This looks and sounds wonderful but I do have a question.

What do you mean exactly when recommending it be topped off with hot custard?  I'm old enough to have grown up eating individual egg custards but they were always served cold.  Having never made egg custard myself, I believe they needed to set up in the fridge.

Would you kindly expand on this a bit?  A recipe would be fantastic.
Back to Top
English Rose View Drop Down
Cook's Assistant
Cook's Assistant
Avatar

Joined: 23 April 2018
Location: England
Status: Offline
Points: 83
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote English Rose Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 May 2018 at 09:43
Hello Gracoman, I am so sorry, I think you may have misunderstood. When I say topped off with Custard, It was my English way of saying  "topped off" which means "finished off" with glorious custard. I do tend to forget that this is an International Food Forum and many people would not know what I mean.

To clarify, what I was trying to say was that a lovely pudding such as this would not be what it is without having hot Vanilla Custard poured over it.

TongueTongueTongue  
Live Life every day as though it is your last.
Back to Top
English Rose View Drop Down
Cook's Assistant
Cook's Assistant
Avatar

Joined: 23 April 2018
Location: England
Status: Offline
Points: 83
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote English Rose Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 May 2018 at 10:03
[QUOTE=HistoricFoodie]Anyone who claims to dislike this one just doesn't know what good is.

Variations on the theme pre-date 1823 by quite a few years, going back at least to the 18th century. In our cookbook, "A Colonial Virginia Book of Cookery," for instance, we have a recipe for an apple "cake" that was adapted from a ca 1790 cookery manuscript. r
[/QU

LOL, It doesn't surprise me in the least HF.  I don't tend to go too much into the history of other countries food history. I do know of course about the famous American Apple Cake, and that Apples were first grown in Asia and brought over to Europe in the 17th Century and then taken to North America. But that is far as any knowledge gleaned.
Live Life every day as though it is your last.
Back to Top
gracoman View Drop Down
Chef
Chef


Joined: 09 August 2013
Status: Offline
Points: 714
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gracoman Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 May 2018 at 10:59
Originally posted by English Rose English Rose wrote:

Hello Gracoman, I am so sorry, I think you may have misunderstood. When I say topped off with Custard, It was my English way of saying  "topped off" which means "finished off" with glorious custard. I do tend to forget that this is an International Food Forum and many people would not know what I mean.

To clarify, what I was trying to say was that a lovely pudding such as this would not be what it is without having hot Vanilla Custard poured over it.

TongueTongueTongue  
Thanks for the clarification Rose.  I'd never heard of hot custard before now.  Sounds like a marriage made in dessert heaven Thumbs Up
Back to Top
Melissa Mead View Drop Down
Master Chef
Master Chef


Joined: 17 July 2010
Location: Albany, NY, USA
Status: Offline
Points: 1052
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Melissa Mead Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 May 2018 at 19:17
This sounds delicious, and like it would be great made with Northern Spys.
Back to Top
HistoricFoodie View Drop Down
Master Chef
Master Chef


Joined: 21 February 2012
Location: Kentucky
Status: Offline
Points: 4529
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 May 2018 at 04:54
Don't say that, Melissa. Northern Spys---certainly among the top five or six apples in the world---have one major fault: they do not travel well. And I miss them.

That aside, you're probably right. They would work great in this dish. Or, maybe, a mixture of Northern Spys and Courtlands?
But we hae meat and we can eat
And sae the Lord be thanket
Back to Top
HistoricFoodie View Drop Down
Master Chef
Master Chef


Joined: 21 February 2012
Location: Kentucky
Status: Offline
Points: 4529
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 May 2018 at 05:34
I don't tend to go too much into the history of other countries food history.

I appreciate that, Rose. We only have so much time, and devote most of it to our prime interests.

The thing is, the foodways of colonial North America are, at base, British, modified by local conditions and the range of New World ingredients. Heck! The first American cookbook wasn’t even published until 1796. Until then, written recipes appeared in two forms: In British cookbooks, imported from the home country, or copied by printers on this side of the Pond, and in cookery manuscripts.

Those last are particularly interesting. What happened is that women of the day kept these manuscripts, cooking notebooks, if you will. They worked from both sides; one being “a book of cookery,” the other being “a book of sweetmeats.”

Not a helter skelter collection, these books were organized by recipe type, and had a contents page. As madam obtained new recipes, she’d add them to blank pages in the center, which, of course, messed up the organization a bit.

When a daughter of the house reached her teens, she’d start a new book. First she’d re-organize Mama’s book, so the new material appeared in the proper place. She’d then copy the whole thing into a new book, which became her cookery manuscript when she married and started her own household.

The most famous of these is the misnamed Martha Washington’s Book of Cookery. This was published under that name in the 1930’s, by the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation. In actuality, the manuscript was a Custis/Lee family heirloom, dating from about 1645. It’s doubtful that Martha Washington ever actually cooked out of it. She’d have found much of it outdated. But, from a marketing standpoint, it was a great title.

Perhaps the biggest difference between pure British cooking and the adaptations in the Colonies was the speed with which New World ingredients were adopted. Take tomatoes, for example. In Virginia, tomatoes were grown as a food crop at least as early as 1780. It was well into the 19th century before most Britains would eat them, because, being nightshades, it was assumed they were poisonous. Although Hannah Glasse included at least one recipe using tomatoes in her mid-18th century The Art of Cookery Made Plain and Easy.

So, while I can well understand you not getting into the food history of France, and Germany, and Spain, and the like, the food history of America is, essentially, the same as your own.


But we hae meat and we can eat
And sae the Lord be thanket
Back to Top
Melissa Mead View Drop Down
Master Chef
Master Chef


Joined: 17 July 2010
Location: Albany, NY, USA
Status: Offline
Points: 1052
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Melissa Mead Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 May 2018 at 09:49
Originally posted by HistoricFoodie HistoricFoodie wrote:

Don't say that, Melissa. Northern Spys---certainly among the top five or six apples in the world---have one major fault: they do not travel well. And I miss them.

That aside, you're probably right. They would work great in this dish. Or, maybe, a mixture of Northern Spys and Courtlands?


I even have a hard time finding them around here lately.

Mm, Cortlands. Those and Empires are my favorite eating apples.
Back to Top
HistoricFoodie View Drop Down
Master Chef
Master Chef


Joined: 21 February 2012
Location: Kentucky
Status: Offline
Points: 4529
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 May 2018 at 12:46
Well, they're tempermental, even on their own turf. I suspect growers have replaced them with newer breeds, such as the Pink Lady. Alas!
But we hae meat and we can eat
And sae the Lord be thanket
Back to Top
Melissa Mead View Drop Down
Master Chef
Master Chef


Joined: 17 July 2010
Location: Albany, NY, USA
Status: Offline
Points: 1052
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Melissa Mead Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 May 2018 at 15:33
I like Pink Ladies too, but it's like comparing apples to...well, totally different apples.
Back to Top
HistoricFoodie View Drop Down
Master Chef
Master Chef


Joined: 21 February 2012
Location: Kentucky
Status: Offline
Points: 4529
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 May 2018 at 18:41
But we hae meat and we can eat
And sae the Lord be thanket
Back to Top
TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar

Joined: 25 January 2010
Location: Chinook, MT
Status: Offline
Points: 8952
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09 May 2018 at 10:08
Rose - another beautiful and delicious-looking contribution. Thank you very much for sharing!
If you are a visitor and like what you see, please click here and join the discussions in our community!
Back to Top
 Post Reply Post Reply
  Share Topic   

Forum Jump Forum Permissions View Drop Down



This page was generated in 0.110 seconds.