Foods of the World Forum Homepage
Forum Home Forum Home > Food Groups > Fats, Oils, Sauces, Sweets and Condiments
  New Posts New Posts RSS Feed - FarmSteady's  Beer Mustard
  FAQ FAQ  Forum Search   Events   Register Register  Login Login

This site is completely supported by donations; there are no corporate sponsors. We would be honoured if you would consider a small donation, to be used exclusively for forum expenses.



Thank you, from the Foods of the World Forums!

FarmSteady's Beer Mustard

 Post Reply Post Reply
Author
Message
TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar

Joined: 25 January 2010
Location: Chinook, MT
Status: Offline
Points: 8903
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: FarmSteady's Beer Mustard
    Posted: 31 January 2018 at 15:14
FarmSteady's Beer Mustard

One of my goals for this coming weekend is to make Soft Pretzels and Beer Cheese, using the kit that I purchased from FarmSteady:

http://farmsteady.com/instructions-how-to-make-soft-pretzels/

In their instructions, they also include a recipe for beer mustard, so I'll be making that, as well.

I am adding this recipe to the collective knowledge here, in case anyone wants to try it:

Quote How to Make Beer Mustard

Equipment

Food Processor or Blender
Sauce Pan
Non-Reactive Bowl

Ingredients

1.5 oz of mustard seeds
2 Tablespoons (30 ml) vinegar (Apple cider vinegar is best)
1/4 Cup (60 ml) Beer (Dark and malty German, Belgian, or English beer is best)
Spice Pack*

In non-reactive bowl, add mustard seeds.

Add vinegar and 2 tablespoons (30 ml) beer to mustard seeds. Cover and place in the refrigerator for 8-12 hours while mustard seeds acidify.

Note: Mustard seeds only start to taste hot, spicy, and mustard-like after soaking in something acidic. Otherwise, they taste more like seeds than mustard.

After your mustard has sat in the fridge for 8-12 hours, combine spice pack and 2 tablespoons (30 ml) of beer in a small sauce pan.

On medium heat, bring to a boil while stirring, then remove from heat. Let cool for 10 minutes.

In a food processor or blender, combine the mustard seeds (with its liquid) from the fridge with the spice and beer mixture from the sauce pan.

Blend until desired smoothness is reached. A great mustard can be super smooth or quite chunky. Make it how you like it.

Transfer to a sealed container and refrigerate for at least 8 hours before eating. This allows for the flavor and consistency to meld.

Enjoy with pretzels and beer. If you don't eat it all right away, your beer mustard will keep in the fridge for a month.

http://farmsteady.com/instructions-how-to-make-beer-mustard/


*My kit didn't come with this, so I have written to the company so that they can send one to me. It will arrive too late to use it this time, but that's okay; more incentive to make it again! In the meantime, a quick internet search reveals that common spices used in various beer mustard recipes include salt, brown sugar, allspice, onion and garlic. With this in mind, I'll improvise something for my first attempt.

Note that this recipe uses a food processor. I might prepare it in a mortar and pestle instead, for a coarser mustard.

More as it happens, etc. &c....

Ron
If you are a visitor and like what you see, please click here and join the discussions in our community!
Back to Top
Sponsored Links


Back to Top
pitrow View Drop Down
Chef
Chef
Avatar

Joined: 22 November 2010
Location: Newberg, Oregon
Status: Offline
Points: 937
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote pitrow Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 31 January 2018 at 16:26
Ron, I'd suggest making the mustard asap if you're planning on using it this weekend. the couple times I've made it, it comes out super harsh at the beginning and needs at least a couple days to mellow out. The last batch I made (maple bourbon mustard) took about 2.5-3 weeks to mellow.

Also the point about mustard and heat is slightly backwards. It's the presence of water when the seeds are crushed that makes the spicy chemicals come out. The vinegar (or any acid) stops that reaction. Also, if the seeds are crushed in just water, the peak of that reaction occurs in about 15 minutes. But I've never seen a recipe that has you crush the seeds with water first, everything has the vinegar mixed in with whatever other liquid you're using.
Mike
Life in PitRow - My often neglected, somewhat eccentric, occasionally outstanding blog
Back to Top
TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar

Joined: 25 January 2010
Location: Chinook, MT
Status: Offline
Points: 8903
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 31 January 2018 at 20:37
Hi, Mike -

We must have been thinking along the same lines, because I went and bought the stuff for this right after work. I figured that I should start it tonight so that it will have a few days to meld.

Regarding the role of water and acid, I suspect you're right. While I was making this I had a few seeds that went astray. Chewing on them, they started getting "hot" almost immediately.

I got a couple of photos and will try to post them tomorrow.

If you are a visitor and like what you see, please click here and join the discussions in our community!
Back to Top
TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar

Joined: 25 January 2010
Location: Chinook, MT
Status: Offline
Points: 8903
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 February 2018 at 09:16
Alright - as promised, here are three photos showing the beginning of this mustard project. The lighting isn't as good as I would prefer, but it will have to do.

First, we have the essential ingredients to get this started:



Mustard seed; a good, dark, HefeWeizen brewed in Montana by a man from Bavaria; apple cider vinegar.

This first stage is very, very easy; it doesn't really merit photos, but here they are.

Getting started, I measured out 1.5 ounces of the mustard seed:



Each container proclaims that it holds 1.4 ounces of mustard seed; however, the one I used had 1.49 ounces. I double-checked to make sure that I zeroed-out the scale; finding this to be an accurate measure, I added just enough mustard seed to reach the mark.

Next, I added 2 tablespoons each of the apple cider vinegar and beer:



That's all there is to it! I covered the container and set the mixture in the refrigerator; I'll finish the mustard tonight, which will give a couple-three days for the flavours to meld and mellow out.

More as it happens; etc. &c....

Ron
If you are a visitor and like what you see, please click here and join the discussions in our community!
Back to Top
gunhaus View Drop Down
Cook's Assistant
Cook's Assistant


Joined: 01 February 2018
Location: Just north of t
Status: Offline
Points: 25
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gunhaus Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 February 2018 at 13:14
Hi ALL!'
Ron invited me over from another forum, where we were having a great discussion about mustard, and pork, and pretzels and beer and all of life's wonderful things! Not sure of the proper decorum here a bouts, so i thought i would just jump in, say hello and dive right off with a recipe that may or may not be on topic (Hope it's close) With all the talk about mustard here and pork on the other sight it reminded me of pork chops that are a big hit with my son. I am sorry if this a sort of off the cuff recipe rather than a precise thing, but i learned it before i had a cookbook of my own - It is measured on the granny standard!
Take four or five big thick center cut pork chops- BONE IN PREFERABLY , salt and pepper them, then smear a nice layer of your favorite mustard on one side.

Now take a big dutch oven or roaster, lay out five or six nice slices of good bacon on the bottom. Then slice up two big soft ball onions, 6-8 cloves of garlic mashed and chopped, and a good pound or more of kraut, ( Big bag or one of the large jars if you don;t make your own - equivalent if you do. The kraut from this is wonderful so if you love it add more it can't hurt.) 
Now layer about half the onions, half the kraut, half the garlic, and goodly sprinkle of fresh cracked pepper. Then lay on the chops, and add the onions, kraut, garlic, and pepper again. 

Pour on about a cup or so of chicken stock, and a bottle of really good beer. (Something german or english with malty flavors and lower hops - I would skip the 4 million IBU IPA's that are so popular for this one!) 

Cover this critter, and bake at about 300 for 2-2-1/2 hours. This will be fall apart pork, succulent and tender, the kraut/onion/garlic/pot licker will be a form of ambrosia. Get some crusty bread (Or even some nice warm fresh pretzelsBig smile) Some more of your yummy fresh mustard, a BIG mug of tasty brew, And make your tongue happy and your cardiologist mad.

BONUS recipe - sort of - if you substitute duck, wild or domestic, (Remove the skin and as much fat as possible from the domestic and save for other things) it makes a stupendous dish. You can also do really nice smoked sausage as the meat OR add a little right to the duck or pork chop dish to sort of gild the lily. My son even takes Bratwurst and grills them half done, and throws them in the roaster right on top for the last 30 minutes or so. Sort of a multi-purpose dish! 
-John
Back to Top
TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar

Joined: 25 January 2010
Location: Chinook, MT
Status: Offline
Points: 8903
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 February 2018 at 13:43
Welcome, John - and WOW! That pork chop dish sounds great; I do believe I'll be trying it before too long, as we like pork chops here. This will make a great dish for my Dutch oven and I'm eager to try it.

I'm pretty sure that you're going to fit in very well here, sir. We are all about the "grandma recipes."
If you are a visitor and like what you see, please click here and join the discussions in our community!
Back to Top
pitrow View Drop Down
Chef
Chef
Avatar

Joined: 22 November 2010
Location: Newberg, Oregon
Status: Offline
Points: 937
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote pitrow Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 February 2018 at 14:39
Welcome John! Like Ron says, your pork chop dish sounds great and I'll have to try it soon too. Thanks Smile
Mike
Life in PitRow - My often neglected, somewhat eccentric, occasionally outstanding blog
Back to Top
gunhaus View Drop Down
Cook's Assistant
Cook's Assistant


Joined: 01 February 2018
Location: Just north of t
Status: Offline
Points: 25
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gunhaus Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 February 2018 at 14:52
Thanks! Can't ever go wrong with good old comfort food!!!!
Back to Top
TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar

Joined: 25 January 2010
Location: Chinook, MT
Status: Offline
Points: 8903
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 February 2018 at 14:50
I finished my beer mustard last night, and it turned out very good, I think; I am guessing that it will be even better when the flavours meld and mellow a bit.

Continuing where I left off, I took the container with the mustard seeds, beer and vinegar out of the refrigerator and resumed my work. The mustard seeds had, by now, absorbed all but a few drops of the beer and vinegar.

The instructions call for the use of a spice pack that is included with the kit; unfortunately, mine did not come with one. FarmSteady offered to send a replacement; however, it would arrive too late to use for this weekend, so I made up my own after a little looking around and a lot of thought. For this recipe, here are the spices that I used:



1/2 teaspoon of kosher salt
1/4 teaspoon garlic powder
1/4 teaspoon onion powder
1/4 teaspoon allspice
1/4 teaspoon ground coriander

I also added 1 tablespoon of honey.

Except (perhaps?) for the garlic, it "seemed" reasonably German to me, which is what I was going for. I was fairly conservative with my measurements, since I was in new territory and did not want to overwhelm my mustard. Once I see how this works out, I can adjust for future batches; having said that, early indications are that it is going to go really well, by itself and with the pretzels.

Moving along, I measured each of the spices and added it to a small saucepan:



I then added the tablespoon of honey and 2 tablespoons of the same beer that I started with:



Following the instructions, I put this on the stove over medium heat and brought it just to a boil, stirring fairly constantly. The mixture darkened up a bit as (presumably) the Maillard Reaction did its wonderful work, and when the boil was achieved, I removed the saucepan from the heat and let the mixture cool for 10 minutes, stirring occasionally.

The spice mixture that I had improvised was proving to be a good one, in my opinion; the aromas coming from the saucepan were quite enticing, and it seemed to me that all spices were present and working together, with none taking over. The addition of the coriander was a last-minute decision, and one that I am glad that I made; it seemed to tie everything together really well.

Once the spice mixture cooled, I brought everything together for the final step of the process: mixing the mustard itself. I briefly considered using my mortar and pestle to do this, but ultimately decided that I'd be better off just tossing it in the Magic Bullet with the grinder "blade." Here's how it looked going in:



A few pulses and whirls later, I had a mostly-smooth mustard with a little bit of grain left in it, just as I intended; here is how it looked:



Not too bad, for a first attempt!

My only concern was that the mustard seemed a little thicker than it "should" be; when I showed this photo to Brook, he confirmed my first impression, stating that mustard tends to thicken as it mellows. Because of this, I'll probably transfer it to a larger container and stir in a little more beer tonight until it achieves the consistency that I am expecting; I am pretty sure that it won't take much. I'll then return it to the refrigerator and try to forget about it for a couple of days.

That's it, as far as the mustard is concerned!



Tonight, I will start my beer cheese, which is basically home-made cream cheese with reduced beer added (the same dark Hefeweizen that I used for this mustard). The procedure will be very much the same as the one I used when making cream cheese for my Everything Bagel project:

http://foodsoftheworld.activeboards.net/cream-cheese-kit-from-farmsteady_topic4708.html

The only difference will be the addition of the bottle of beer - reduced to 1/2 cup in volume - and that no heavy cream is added.

Then, Saturday evening or Sunday morning, I will bake my home-made soft pretzels, completing the trinity!

As always, thanks for your continuing interest in this project. If you have any questions, comments or other feedback, feel free to post them as a reply to this thread, as discussion is never a bad thing. Also, if anyone is even thinking about trying this - or the related projects with the beer cheese and pretzels - I'd encourage you to do so. My opinion is that the FarmSteady kits are a very good "gateway" into some really nice things that you can and will discover, after you take the plunge.

Ron
If you are a visitor and like what you see, please click here and join the discussions in our community!
Back to Top
pitrow View Drop Down
Chef
Chef
Avatar

Joined: 22 November 2010
Location: Newberg, Oregon
Status: Offline
Points: 937
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote pitrow Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 February 2018 at 15:51
Great Job Ron!

As to the texture, mine usually comes out thick like that too, no matter what recipe I use. It never seems to have that smooth consistency of store bought. I usually just go with it, but I might try adding more liquid before blending to see what that does one of these days.
Mike
Life in PitRow - My often neglected, somewhat eccentric, occasionally outstanding blog
Back to Top
HistoricFoodie View Drop Down
Master Chef
Master Chef


Joined: 21 February 2012
Location: Kentucky
Status: Offline
Points: 4517
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 February 2018 at 19:03
It's difficult to get that creamy smoothness of store bought, Mike, because commercial mustard makers use roller mills to crush the seed.

You can't get that fine of a grind using a food processor or the like.

In my experience, egg-thickened mustards tend to be smoother than other kinds.

But, what the hey! If I want ballpark mustard, Heinz does a better job.

FWIW, we did a mustard thread awhile back: http://www.foodsoftheworld.activeboards.net/making-it-with-mustard_topic3079.html
But we hae meat and we can eat
And sae the Lord be thanket
Back to Top
TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar

Joined: 25 January 2010
Location: Chinook, MT
Status: Offline
Points: 8903
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 February 2018 at 09:50
Thanks for linking that discussion to this thread, Brook - I took a good look at it and re-read it before starting this project, and tried to incorporate some ideas.

The mustard turned out great - still pretty hot on SuperBowl Sunday, but everyone liked it - even The Beautiful Mrs. Tas!
If you are a visitor and like what you see, please click here and join the discussions in our community!
Back to Top
HistoricFoodie View Drop Down
Master Chef
Master Chef


Joined: 21 February 2012
Location: Kentucky
Status: Offline
Points: 4517
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 February 2018 at 13:39
Doncha just love it when a plan comes together!
But we hae meat and we can eat
And sae the Lord be thanket
Back to Top
TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar

Joined: 25 January 2010
Location: Chinook, MT
Status: Offline
Points: 8903
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 February 2018 at 13:50
It happens so rarely - I will take my victories when I can!
If you are a visitor and like what you see, please click here and join the discussions in our community!
Back to Top
 Post Reply Post Reply
  Share Topic   

Forum Jump Forum Permissions View Drop Down



This page was generated in 0.078 seconds.