Foods of the World Forum Homepage
Forum Home Forum Home > Other Food-Related Topics > Curing of Meats, Charcuterie and Smokehouse Specialties
  New Posts New Posts RSS Feed - Favorite Charcuterie How-To Books?
  FAQ FAQ  Forum Search   Events   Register Register  Login Login

This site is completely supported by donations; there are no corporate sponsors. We would be honoured if you would consider a small donation, to be used exclusively for forum expenses.



Thank you, from the Foods of the World Forums!

Favorite Charcuterie How-To Books?

 Post Reply Post Reply
Author
Message
HistoricFoodie View Drop Down
Master Chef
Master Chef


Joined: 21 February 2012
Location: Kentucky
Status: Offline
Points: 4521
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: Favorite Charcuterie How-To Books?
    Posted: 27 August 2016 at 23:54
So, I've just about decided, after the numerous posts on the subject here, to get involved with charcuterie; most likely sausage making.

I need some references, though. What would you guys recommend as the best how-to books for beginners? And, what about your recommendations, makes them the best choices?
But we hae meat and we can eat
And sae the Lord be thanket
Back to Top
Sponsored Links


Back to Top
Hoser View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar

Joined: 06 February 2010
Location: Cumberland, RI
Status: Offline
Points: 3385
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Hoser Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 August 2016 at 03:36
I honestly think it would be impossible for me to choose just one Brook, but here is an interesting thread that might help you out a great deal.

Go ahead...play with your food!
Back to Top
gonefishin View Drop Down
Master Chef
Master Chef
Avatar

Joined: 20 September 2012
Status: Offline
Points: 1773
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gonefishin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 August 2016 at 08:14
   Hi Brook,

   When looking at your question, two places come to my mind.  


    MeatsandSausage - Wedliny Domowe...no matter which section you go to, realize that under each heading there are a good deal of subtopics to choose from.  But they can be overlooked because the subheadings are in a drop down menu near the header.

     Don't forget their forum, lots of good discussion there!


     lPoli ...Really nice site here too.  It runs through the information you need, it provides you with very sound recipes in a wide range of sausages and it provides you with the necessary ratios in order to formulate an understanding of your own in advances your recipes.  Actually, both of the websites I listed give you the necessary information to come to an understanding of sausage making...not just following recipes.
    
    Anymore, before I start making sausages I rewash all my equipment that will come into contact with meat or spices and also sanitize it with Star-San.  This is a no rinse sanitizer that only needs 1-2 minutes of contact time.  I always have some on hand from brewing beer.

   Brook, you've talked about this for a while, I'm excited that you're deciding to delve deeper into sausage making.  
Enjoy The Food!
Back to Top
HistoricFoodie View Drop Down
Master Chef
Master Chef


Joined: 21 February 2012
Location: Kentucky
Status: Offline
Points: 4521
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29 August 2016 at 05:55
Thanks, guys. Lot's of info to absorb from those sites.

Meanwhile, does anyone have a list of basic equipment? I want to really start with the basics; ya know.....this is a boot. A boot goes on your foot.

I recently got the new Walton's catalog, and there is such a diversity of equipment, chemicals, and seasonings offered that I'm not sure where to start.

And, while we're at it, what about suppliers? You guys got any preferences?
But we hae meat and we can eat
And sae the Lord be thanket
Back to Top
gonefishin View Drop Down
Master Chef
Master Chef
Avatar

Joined: 20 September 2012
Status: Offline
Points: 1773
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gonefishin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29 August 2016 at 07:45
     My limited experience is based on equipment that I have used, or used making sausage, salami, etc with my brother.  When I make sausage it's normally smaller batches, 5-15lb.  My brother makes much larger batches, and therefor, has larger equipment.  

    First off, I'd give some thought to what size equipment you need.  For me, staying with a 5lb sausage stuffer suits me perfectly.  I commonly take out 5 or 10lbs of chunks and make a batch of sausage from that.  

   Two pieces of advice I can give is don't used a Kitchen Aide as a grinder, or a stuffer.  I have a Kitchen Aide and love it for many different functions in the kitchen...it's a beautiful piece of machinery.  But, it does a poor job at grinding, and subsequently heat the meat up slightly because of the poor job it does.  Second is to buy a dedicated sausage stuffer.  These do such a fantastic job stuffing sausages!  A dedicated stuffer is an example of the right tool for the job.  If you want to make the stuffer even better, spring for the SS tubes...it makes an enjoyable job even easier.  What size?  As discussed earlier you need to but forth some thought in how you'll be making sausage.  I have a 5lb and it's perfect for me.

    Grinders?  I don't know.  I bought a LEM BIG BITE #8 and have to say I'm not impressed at all after using it for some time.  While I don't grind frozen mean, I do grind frozen back fat.  The back fat we get is wonderful, straight from the slaughter house.  It renders at a very low temperature and therefor we freeze it before grinding.  The LEM motor commonly bogs down and will trip the circuit.  When feeding the backfat through I've got to baby the machine, instead of dropping the pieces in.  Doing this it still bogs down, but I can get away with it tripping the internal reset less often...but it still happens.  I use this same method with my brother old cheap grinder without any bogging down...it spits the frozen back fat our in a beautiful grind.  

    That said, I'm not sure what brand to go with.  The LEM BB is a beautiful machine in other ways...and if you're grinding chicken breast you'll be fine...you'll think it's a beast of a machine.  In the end, I make due and deal with it...it does get the job done, but not as I thought it would.  I should say, the rest of the machine is nice...and it grinds really nice.  Good feed, nice clean grind on the meat or fat.  It really grinds nice...it's just the motor bogs down and trips.  Knives, throat, etc on the thing are designed well.

   


    
Enjoy The Food!
Back to Top
HistoricFoodie View Drop Down
Master Chef
Master Chef


Joined: 21 February 2012
Location: Kentucky
Status: Offline
Points: 4521
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29 August 2016 at 13:52
Thanks, Dan,

Good advice about thinking through what I'll be doing. My intent is to do small batches---there's just Friend Wife and me, after all---so a stuffer in the 5-7 pound range is probably all I'll need.

I'd pretty well figured on stainless tubes. Something about the plastic ones just doesn't appeal. And, oddly, the price points aren't all that different.

I've talked about my Tasin grinder in the past. This is a similar machine to the ones sold by Bass Pro and Cabellas. I paid $99 bucks for it in the late '90s, and it's still going strong. But I don't like the size of the cutter and plates, so might spring for a new one. Also, the motor is getting tired, and I don't think it could handle semi-frozen meat or fat.

Frankly, it isn't the large pieces of equipment that have me confused. It's the myriad of small stuff. Sort of like canning: lots of tools that would be nice to have, but you really only need a few. It's those "few," for charcuterie, that I'm interested in. F'rinstance do I need a thermometer dedicated to this? Special handling tools? You get the idea.

And what about tools and materials for making cured sausage as well as fresh? Are there different things required?

Etc.
But we hae meat and we can eat
And sae the Lord be thanket
Back to Top
Hoser View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar

Joined: 06 February 2010
Location: Cumberland, RI
Status: Offline
Points: 3385
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Hoser Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 31 August 2016 at 03:45
A five pound stuffer sounds like just the ticket Brook. That's all I use, and they are obviously more cost efficient.
Along with that some food grade silicone lubricant for the stuffer can be very handy, you'll want to keep some cure number 1, and cure number two if you are going to be making dry cured sausages. Also if venturing into the dry-cure arena, a hygrometer and dedicated refrigerator is a necessity. 

Personally, I would say start out with some nice fresh sausage, graduate up to cure #1 and smoking after that before you make the leap to things like pepperoni or sopressata.

I wish you luck my friend on your new adventure. Don't hesitate to email or pm me if you have any specific problems.
Go ahead...play with your food!
Back to Top
HistoricFoodie View Drop Down
Master Chef
Master Chef


Joined: 21 February 2012
Location: Kentucky
Status: Offline
Points: 4521
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 31 August 2016 at 06:33
hygrometer

Hmmmmmm? Don't know as I want to own a piece of equipment whose name I can't pronounce.

Seriously, thanks for the tips, Dave.
But we hae meat and we can eat
And sae the Lord be thanket
Back to Top
gonefishin View Drop Down
Master Chef
Master Chef
Avatar

Joined: 20 September 2012
Status: Offline
Points: 1773
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gonefishin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 31 August 2016 at 08:14
    Hi Brook,

    I have used lPoli's supply links in the past.  I've also used Southern Indiana Butcher Supply. I like them because they have a nice variety of items, good prices and they're somewhat of a local(ish) business.  


   I agree with Hoser, you don't need to fill the cupboards with ingredients.  Look at what recipes your interested in and order those ingredients.  You'll want some cure #1(you don't need the largest container), some casings (your choice of size), spices (I'm sure you have that covered)...then let the recipes you're interested in be your guide.  With just these few things..this should bring you through a lot of sausage recipes.

   If you're not going to venture into dry cured products you may not even want to visit cure #2 yet.  When those recipes become something you're going to venture into...then get it (you certainly don't need a large container of this either).  With cultures, etc...you really don't want to order these until your close to using them.  They do have a shelf life, and there are ways to keep them...but you really don't want them on the shelf waiting for you.  Once you're ready...you'll want to address checking ph and a few other things.  Venture down this road once you get closer to dry cured products

    When/if you are ready to set up a curing chamber InkBird has come out with some nice controls at really good prices!  Inkbird Humidifier/dehumidifer control & Inkbird Temperature Control and a few other items, with an old fridge should serve the trick to get you on your way to dry cured meats.  When I built my brothers curing chamber the Inkbird controllers weren't available.  The other controllers get really pricey and then you have to wire in all the necessary connections.  An important feature in humidity controls is that it has an operating range up to 99.99%RH, many of the previous lower cost controls didn't go up this high.  The temperature control works good too...after building one of my own, the InkBirds became widely available...it's such a nice little package at the right price...I started just buying these.  I think I have 2 inkbirds and 1 DIY temp control.  If you're looking to buy an Inkbird controller, send me a pm...they run discounts quite a bit

   But to get started in fresh sausage...check out a couple of recipes and get the stuff needed for the next three or four sausages you plan to make.  Right now I have some guanciale in my brothers curing chamber, previously made some sage breakfast sausage and plan to make some chicken bratwurst next.  I think you're really going to like this...you just have to jump on in the pool (so to speak).
Enjoy The Food!
Back to Top
TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar

Joined: 25 January 2010
Location: Chinook, MT
Status: Offline
Points: 8918
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 September 2016 at 12:13
Some meat and a bag of TenderQuick would be the best way to get started, in my opinion. Make some bacon, make some Canadian bacon, make some of the various cured beef products. Also, there are dozens of very easy (and delicious) sausages that can be made very successfully by a first-timer.

Once a few fundamentals are learned, it's just a matter of hearing or reading about a form of charcuterie that piques your interest, and then doing some rudimentary research before attempting it.

Having said that, I tend to take a more rural, "farmhouse" approach, rather than a technical or artisanal approach, so take this with a grain of salt (no pun intended).

My main point is to learn from my mistake: stop researching, talking about it, getting ready for it and waiting for the "right" time...and just start doing it. I lost years, for no reason.

Ron
If you are a visitor and like what you see, please click here and join the discussions in our community!
Back to Top
TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar

Joined: 25 January 2010
Location: Chinook, MT
Status: Offline
Points: 8918
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 September 2016 at 13:40
Invaluable information: Dave's Sausage Tutorial-

http://foodsoftheworld.activeboards.net/sausage-making-for-the-beginner_topic2903_page1.html
If you are a visitor and like what you see, please click here and join the discussions in our community!
Back to Top
gonefishin View Drop Down
Master Chef
Master Chef
Avatar

Joined: 20 September 2012
Status: Offline
Points: 1773
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gonefishin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03 January 2017 at 18:12
   Brook, how's it going?
Enjoy The Food!
Back to Top
HistoricFoodie View Drop Down
Master Chef
Master Chef


Joined: 21 February 2012
Location: Kentucky
Status: Offline
Points: 4521
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 January 2017 at 08:03
Thanks for asking, Dan.

This project is going slow, to say the least. Life just keeps getting in the way. Latest distraction: Having the whole house rewired. Had to be done, but don't ask the cost.

I should have been an electrician!
But we hae meat and we can eat
And sae the Lord be thanket
Back to Top
gonefishin View Drop Down
Master Chef
Master Chef
Avatar

Joined: 20 September 2012
Status: Offline
Points: 1773
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gonefishin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 January 2017 at 09:02
    Yikes...the rewiring has to be a hit.  Hopefully things normalize for you
Enjoy The Food!
Back to Top
 Post Reply Post Reply
  Share Topic   

Forum Jump Forum Permissions View Drop Down



This page was generated in 0.047 seconds.