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Favorite Game Dish

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 March 2012 at 11:49
I'm not sure which pheasant recipe I'd sent you, Margi. If you still have it, why don't you post it? And, while you're at it, if you have the Peter's Partridge saved electronically, please post that one, too.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote oldpro Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 March 2012 at 12:41

This is a recipe from James Beard's book "Fowl and Game Cookery".  I don't have the book in fromt of me but have prepared this many times over the years.

Ingredients:
 
Skinned quail, spatchcocked
Dijon Mustard
Bacon (thin or regular sliced)
Giblets from the quail or other game birds (livers and hearts.  Gizzards are not giblets in my world)
Unsalted butter
Sherry or brandy
Toast from white bread, crusts removed
Cracked pepper
 
Preheat oven to 450 on broil, or prepare charcoal grill
 
Coat quail liberally on the breast and legs with Dijon mustard.  Pepper liberally.  Cut the bacon in half and cover the quail breasts and legs.  Broil in the oven until the bacon is crisp, drizzling occasionally with the butter, for around 15 to 20 minutes.
 
Melt a couple of tablespoons of butter in a saute pan, and saute giblets until done (around 3 minutes).  Remove the giblets and finely chop.  Deglaze the pan with the sherry (or brandy), and add butter to the pan.  Saute for 3 or 4 minutes until the proper consistency is attained.  The amount of butter and brandy will depend on the number of birds you are preparing.
 
Spread a thin film of Dijon mustard on the  toast.  Spread the giblets on the toast.  Top with the quail, and pour the butter mixture over the birds. 
 
If you are doing the birds on the pit, you want to cook on indirect heat with a fairly hot fire, covered,  to allow the bacon to crisp.  Baste with melted butter periodically.
 
Next to fried quail with cream gravy this is our family favorite.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 March 2012 at 05:07
Laura Calder, who has a TV show called French Food At Home prepared this dish on one episode. I adapted it slightly, and we have it fairly often. I'd sent the recipe to Margi, who agrees it's a great way of preparing quail.
 
BRAISED QUAIL WITH WILD MUSHROOMS

6 quail, cleaned                            Salt & pepper

2 tbls lard or butter                     Splash olive oil

¼ lb bacon, cut in lardoons        1 lg onion, chopped

1 tbls flour                                    1 cup white wine

1 cup chicken stock                     1 lb assorted wild mushrooms,

¼ cup fresh parsley, chopped      cut in large pieces

 Truss quail if necessary. Season with salt and pepper. Melt lard or butter & oil in a heavy pot, and brown the birds on all sides. Set aside. Add bacon to pan; cook to just browned. Set aside. Add onions to pan and fry until golden.

 Stir flour into onions; cook one minute more. Geglaze with the wine, stirring up brown bits on bottom. Return the bacon and quail to the pot. Pour in the stock, cover, and simmer until quail are cooked through, about 15 minutes.

 Meanwhile, sauté mushrooms, seasoned with salt and pepper, until tender, adding parsley at the last moment.

Remove quail to a serving platter and keep warm. Boil the liquid, uncovered, until slightly thickened. Add the mushrooms to the sauce and spoon over quail.

 

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote oldpro Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 March 2012 at 05:20
Brook,
 
I'll try that with my next cooking.  I'm short on quail right now, but pretty flush with doves.  I think I'll do a mixed bag and see how that turns out. 
 
Jack
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 March 2012 at 05:20
Ruffed Grouse are the undisputed king of gamebirds. At least they are in North America. In Scotland and Spain, red grouse hold that honor, as does the perdiz in South America, and the black grouse in Norway.
 
No matter which bird you think is the most regal of the partridges, this recipe is both elegant and easy. This is another recipe I'd sent to Margi, when the grouse season opened in her market. She prepared it as a romantic dinner for two.
 
Peter's Partridge
 
1 ruffed grouse or other large partridge
Butter
1 large bunch of seedless white grapes
1 jigger brandy
1 pt heavy cream
 
Pluck the partridge, as this recipe depends on having the skin left on.
 
Melt some butter in a heavy skillet and quickly brown the bird. Salt and pepper it.
 
Stuff the partridge with seedless white grapes and place it in a buttered casserole. Add more grapes until the bird is completely covered. Top iwht a tablespoon of butter, cover the casserole, and put in a 375F oven for about 25 minutes. Periodically bases the bird with the liquid from the grapes.
 
Just before removing the bird from the oven add the brandy.
 
Remove bird from the casserole and set aside, keeing it warm. Boil down the drippings and grape juice in the casserole. There should be some whole grapes left as well. Stir in the cream and bring to a simmer.
 
Carve the bird and serve the sauce separately in a gravy boat.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote bkleinsmid Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 May 2013 at 11:19
[QUOTE=TasunkaWitko]don't get me wrong, i do a lot of hunting for deer (both whitetail and mule) and for pronghorn. but birds is an area where i've never really gone due to bad shotgun skills, which i hope to rectify this summer in time for fall hunting. when that happens, i'll be doing plenty of experimenting for sure. we don't have quail here, but i beleive what you call chukar is the same thing that we call hungarian partridges - very wonderful birds - probably my favourite both for hunting and eating.
 
Ron........I was invited out a couple of times to hunt pheasants. I thought my shotgun had a bent barrel.....at least that's what I told every one. A buddy of mine suggested that I try trap shooting as a way of honing my skills. What a difference a day makes. Give it a try......it can be addicting......so much fun.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 May 2013 at 12:49
I think that would definitely help! All I need now is the time to do it ~ Confused
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote bkleinsmid Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 May 2013 at 13:10
Just bring Mrs. Tas with you. I taught my other half to shoot and now she makes sure we have the time. Funny how that works......

B~
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 May 2013 at 13:13
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 May 2013 at 18:07
Trap and skeet can be fun games in their own right. But to really hone your hunting skills, sporting clays is the way to go. Multiple targets at different elevations, released from different positions. Variously sized and colored targets. Targets that swoop and cut like a Frisbee. Targets that go straight away from you, and straight towards you. Targets that climb straight up, like teal, or bounce on the ground, like rabbits. True pairs, following pairs, report pairs.

This is as close to hunting as you can get with clay birds. And it's an enjoyable sport, too.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 May 2013 at 18:19
On the down side: Even in a pressure cooker, no matter how long you cook claybirds they never get tender. Alas!

I taught my other half to shoot and now she makes sure we have the time. Funny how that works......

Absolutely true, Brad. Plus you'll always have a hunting partner available.

What amazes me is the number of men who object to this. They don't want their wives along. I, on the other hand, love having Friend Wife afield with me, hunting and fishing both.

Along those lines, the first time she went squirrel hunting she carried, unbeknownst to her, a $13,000 AYA side-by-side 20 gauge. This at a time when an 870 Wingmaster sold for about $250.

Naturally, she loved it, and inquired, after we got home, how much it was worth. "About 13," I replied off-handedly. She was in shock. "Thirteen hundred dollars for a shotgun!" she exclaimed. And then she almost had a cardiac when I told her to add a zero to that figure." To this day she finds it hard to believe I handed her that gun to go squirrel hunting.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gonefishin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29 May 2013 at 08:08
   Brook, great story to share about you and your wife...it speaks volumes for the both of you :)

  I do like to go trap shooting, but I have to say...I'm awful at it.  I don't mean like awe shucks, I wish I can do a little better.  I'm bad...but I enjoy it and always give it my best.  Sporting clays, I haven't done it yet...but that looks awesome (as far as shooting games go).  I'll get to it someday, but I've got to hone my skills a bit first. 

    Favorite game?

   Venison tenderloins are tough to beat.

   I would put rabbit, duck, pheasant, quail, squirrel right up there too though.  Never had bear though (except jerky...which doesn't count). 

   Brook, your recipes sound delicious.


   Land to hunt around here has become scarce to non-existent...unless you have lots of money or are "in" with a very small group.  The days when people would share their hunting spots, or when farmers would allow people to hunt are dwindling fast around here.  But north of I-80, in Illinois, ain't a great place to live if you like to hunt and shoot.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote drinks Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 April 2015 at 14:54
Texas does have some public shooting, called wildlife management areas requires an annual permit, which I believe is about $50 a year.
National forests, of which we have several, have various regulations and in some cases, fees.
I can hunt within 15 miles of my house, but the hunting is not that good. I have deer in my yard at times and I can shoot them.
Same for rabbits and squirrels.
A lease is rather high, last was $700, had 39 hunters on it, 4500 acres of tree farm and the last year I was on it there were only 7 deer shot.
I just buy a wether goat or a guinea fowl, $35 for the goat and $5 for the guinea.
Getting old and worn out.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote drinks Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 May 2015 at 20:55
There are other animals, too.
Squirrel, rabbit,( not hare) nutria, beaver, woodchuck, marmot, alligator and other local animals can all be used, you just need to find out how to take care of and prepare the meat.
My reservation on hare is specifically about jackrabbit, if more than about 1/2 grown, it can be VERY tough, however, I have been told the varying hare, aka ,snowshoe rabbit can be good.
I have a sneaking hunch that is mostly because the people who live way up north are just hungry!
Would like to compare cottontail and swamp rabbit to varying hare some time. ;<)
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 May 2015 at 21:11
I think much of it has to do with exercise, Drinks. Snowshoes don't spend nearly as much time moving as do Jacks. Seems as though Jacks spend half their time running, and the rest at a fast job. So the muscles don't get as tough.

Even so, while not as tender as Cottontails, Snowshoes do make good grub. I would braise or poach them, though, rather than frying or roasting.

Never had one, myself. But I'm told that European Hares, which go as much as 15 pounds, are also on the tender side.
But we hae meat and we can eat
And sae the Lord be thanket
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