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Favorite Que Sauce

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HistoricFoodie View Drop Down
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    Posted: 09 April 2013 at 12:37
With the grilling season coming on for most folks, I got to be wondering: what's your favorite (homemade!) barbecue sauce?

While I do make several types, depending on what I'm cooking, I find myself gravitating to two primary sauces.

I believe I posted my coffee barbecue sauce elsewhere. This is the one I turn too when I want a sweet sauce; and often use it to make wings. In case I misremember, here it is again:

Coffee Barbecue Sauce

1/3 cup strong black coffee
1/3 cup catsup
1/4 cup Worcestershire
4 tbls butter
4 tbls molasses
1 tbls lemon juice
1/2 tsp salt
1/4 tsp cayenne or couple of glugs hot sauce

Combine all ingredients in a saucepan. Bring to boil, lower heat, and simmer for about 30 minutes

Obviously, when serving this to other than Friend Wife or the beautiful Mrs. Tass, you can up the heat level to any point you desire.

My day-to-day sauce also is low on heat, which you can adapt as necessary. But it's fairly sharp even without chilies because of the pomegranate molasses.

Pomegranite Barbecue Sauce

1/2 a red onion, chopped fine
4 garlic cloves, minced
2-3 chilies, minced (I usually use one Serrano or the like)
1/3 cup pomegranate molasses
1/4 cup honey
1 tbls Worcestershire
Small bottle (14 oz) ketchup
Hot sauce to taste (optional)
1 chipotle, ground
1/4 cup Southern Comfort

Combine all ingredients except Southern Comfort. Bring to boil, reduce to simmer, and cook until mixture thickens and flavors meld. Add the Southern Comfort and cook five minutes more to evaporate the alcohol.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09 April 2013 at 12:45
Those look like a couple of nice barbecue sauces, Brook; in particular, I like the look of the coffee one. Literally, just this morning, I was simmping on a cup of coffee and was impressed with how it called up images of salty, smoky pork over an open fire. I was thinking of breakfast (bacon) at the time, but I could easily see where this sauce would be great on ribs, or perhaps mixed in with pulled pork.
 
I once had a barbecue sauce based on - of all things - raspberries; it was excellent, but I've never had the slightest clue as to how to go about duplicating it. The next time we are in Helena, I'll stop in where I had it and ask them if they would share a sample and perhaps even the recipe, or at least some key ingredients, in return for a feature on the forum. Then again, with my luck, it's probably just some Smuckers raspberry jam stirred into some Bullseye barbecue sauce!LOL
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09 April 2013 at 12:48
You must have really needed that coffee, Ron, if you were simmping it.

While the coffee version will work with pork, it really shines when used with poultry. It originated as a basting sauce for chicken cooked on a spit.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09 April 2013 at 12:53
Quote simmping
 
Shocked
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote AK1 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09 April 2013 at 13:05
Bullseye Original. That is the sauce my dear wife likes. I've made various sauces but she always comes back to Bullseye.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Hoser Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10 April 2013 at 02:14
I'd have to say I'm partial to my Blackjack bbq sauce...if I use a commercial sauce the best I've ever had was Curley's hot and spicy....good stuff.

Blackjack Barbeque Sauce


Makes about 3 cups...serving size 2 ounces
Will last several weeks in the fridge

Serves 12



       Prepared chili sauce, 2 bottles
       2 jalapeno chiles, finely minced
       2 tbsp olive oil
       2 tbsp freshly squeezed lime juice
       ¼ cup brown sugar
       ½ cup onion, minced
       2 tbsp garlic, minced
       2 tbsp cider vinegar
       ¾ cup molasses
       2 tbsp Worcestershire sauce
       12 oz Samuel Adams Boston Lager
       2/3 cup Jack Daniel's old #7
       2 tbsp Pickapeppa sauce


    Saute minced jalapeno, garlic and onions in olive oil.

    Add chili sauce, beer and Jack Daniel's and bring to a boil.

    Add remaining ingredients (except Pickapeppa sauce).

    Reduce heat to medium and cook, stirring occasionally until reduced by 2/3 (1-2 hours)

    Remove from heat and stir in Pickapeppa sauce.


Go ahead...play with your food!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10 April 2013 at 05:58
Love the sound of that one, Dave.

On the chili sauce, what size bottles do you use?
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gonefishin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10 April 2013 at 19:53
   Great sounding recipies!

  You know...I really don't have a homemade Bbq sauce that I use.  I have made sauce in the pat...but I don't have a downright go to recipe.  Huh!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Hoser Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11 April 2013 at 02:05
Originally posted by HistoricFoodie HistoricFoodie wrote:

Love the sound of that one, Dave.

On the chili sauce, what size bottles do you use?

I use the plain old Heinz chili sauce Brook....12 ounce bottles.
Go ahead...play with your food!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Margi Cintrano Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11 April 2013 at 09:31
Truly a fine discussion topic Brook. 

I can also see some very lovely BBQ sauces that I shall have to try, Oven Style ... 

Unfortunately, we are " pavement, cement and capital centre city " folk; thus BBQ is a rarity here ... However, I do have a few of the BBQ sauce & Marinade recipes from our past residences in Argentina, Uruguay, Mexico, San Francisco, California and Miami Beach. 

Shall look through my BBQ notebooks from South America, Mexico and the USA, and post over wkend.

Have nice wkend coming up.
Margaux. 


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Margi Cintrano Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11 April 2013 at 09:54
Hoser, Tas and Those in the Know How; 

I love the sound of Hoser´s  BBQ sauce ... However, please clarify;

1)  picapepper sauce ??? Substitute ??? What type of chili peppers are these ??? 

2)  a Substitute ingredient for Molasses ??? 

Molasses is sold in tins, here in Madrid, however, at Health Food Stores, and price is prohibitive; Fifty Euros for a Kilo !!!  

For that price, we can go to Tony Roma´s  BBQ  !!!  and / or RANCHO TEJANO ( TEXAN RANCH ) which is owned by an American Greek, and it is one of the oldest BBQ restaurants in Europe ... 
AND WONDERFUL. Roney ( Ron ) is a well known member of the American Club, and dear friend of my Publisher since 1958. 

His daughter Alexia, runs the restaurant now --- and it is a marvel ... It is a drive, over to the frontier of Madrid Capital and San Fernando de Henares, 7 km. from  the Frontier on service road, NATIONAL II - THE FREEWAY TO BARCELONA ... 

Another point, as mentioned above;  BBQ pork or beef ribs in Oven --- as you know we reside in centre of Capital; cement and pavement city --- medium high rises ... So, I will have to do this in oven ... 

Hoser and Brook; 

I have Pomegranates ( fresh from Granada for juice ); could your BBQ sauce, do nicely without Molasses, since you are already employing Honey ??? 

Could Honey work as a substitute for the Molasses ???  I have very beautiful sepia colored heather Mountain Honey. 

Your advice, is greatly appreciated, thanks.  

Margaux. 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Rod Franklin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11 April 2013 at 10:22
I have never tasted anything that tasted quite like molasses. I don't think honey would be a good substitute. Maybe dark brown sugar and a little more liquid... You might find something called Black Treacle, which is the British equivalent of molasses. I'm sure Amazon has both. 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11 April 2013 at 12:08
I'm inclined to agree wth Rod, Margi - Molasses is definitely a profile all its own. One thing I have done that worked really well was to make my own "apple molasses," by boiling and reducing a gallon of apple juice down to a thick, dark "molasses" that was thicker than honey. This tasted good, and was not very sweet at all. It wasn't the same as true molasses, but it might work just as well. You want to use someting that is slightly sweet but not sweet at the same time. It is hard to describe.  your dark, not-so-sweet mountain homney would probably work fine, as a substitute, as well.
 
picapeppa sauce is interesting stuff ~ i really like it! your american market or some other american importer probably has it. it looks like this:
 
 
 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Margi Cintrano Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11 April 2013 at 12:27
Tas and Rod. Thank you gents. Appreciate the coaching. I like the apple aromatic idea .. I shall enquire with Taste of America. What exactly is This
pickapepper ?? Thanks alot.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11 April 2013 at 12:35
I can't really describe the flavour of Pickapeppa, it's got a lot of wonderful things going on ~ Here's the profile from the company:
 
Originally posted by The Pickapeppa people The Pickapeppa people wrote:

Pickapeppa Sauce is created using a unique blend of tomatoes, onions, sugar, cane vinegar, mangoes, raisins, tamarinds, peppers and spices. These fine ingredients are selected from seven countries around the world, to ensure the best possible quality. This blend is then aged in oak barrels for one full year before bottling to ensure the rich flavor that Pickapeppa’s admirers so love.
 
Hope this helps!
 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Margi Cintrano Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11 April 2013 at 12:44
Wow. Sort of a Chutney . Lea & Perrins fusion ... I shall contact Taste of America; or order a few things from Amazon ... To make shipping cost worthwhile.   Thanks. I have a Bbq book .. I shall look in boxed collection and consult ... Like a fruit aromatic bbq less than semi sweet ... Semi sweet notes are great ... No soy - allergic. Your apple molasses Tas sounds very lovely and a shot glass of Calvados or Asturian Apple Brandy ??
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote pitrow Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11 April 2013 at 13:12
My favorite for pork or chicken is a mustard based sauce I found online somewhere

Carolina Mustard Sauce
¾ Cup Yellow Mustard
¾ Cup Red Wine Vinegar
½ Cup White Sugar
3 Tbsp. Dark Brown Sugar
2 Tbsp. Butter
2 Tsp. Salt
½ Tbsp. Worcestershire Sauce (Lea & Perrins)
½ Tsp. Soy Sauce
½ Tsp. Tabasco Sauce
1 ½ Tsp. Course Ground Black Pepper
1 Tsp. White Pepper

In a medium saucepan, combine ingredients, stirring to blend. Bring to boil, then lower to simmer for at least 30 minutes. Let stand at room temperature 1 hour before serving.

TIP: I use a handheld upright blender at the simmer point to really give it a good blend and aerate the sauce. It makes for a much “smoother” finished product!


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11 April 2013 at 13:14
FWIW: In the sugar-making process, molasses is the step before true brown sugar forms. So, were it me, I would use brown sugar as a sub.

If using it in my coffee barbecue sauce I wouldn't bother to add more liquid, because you'll be boiling down the whole thing anyway. If you feel more liquid is necessary, dissolve the brown sugar in a little dark corn syrup.

Note, please, that my second recipe does not use regular molasses, but pomegranate molasses. If you're going to start with juice it has to be reduced to a syrupy consistency.

You could probably start with pomegranate syrup (which tends to be more readily available---at least in the states). If so, I would omit the honey, because pom syrup already has sugar added.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote pitrow Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11 April 2013 at 13:21
as for the molasses, barley malt extract / syrup that they use in home beer brewing is pretty close, though it tends to be even less sweet than molasses, closer to blackstrap molasses. If you could find some of that Margi, you could use it, and maybe up the sugar or add honey to make up the sweetness.

I suppose if you could get your hands on some cane syrup you could boil it down to make your own molasses.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11 April 2013 at 13:23

I always do my barbecued ribs "dry," relying on a mustard slather, then rub, then mop/baste, and sometimes a finishing glaze - all in successive layers - to give the ribs body, depth and flavour. Usually, by the time I'm done, it is like having a coating of reduced, crackling, wonderful sauce on them, except it isn't quite as "messy." This basic METHOD can take on many forms and profiles.

When it comes to pulled pork, I really, REALLY love this recipe for an East Carolina finishing sauce:
 
3 Cups Apple Cider Vinegar
1 Bottle (12 oz) your favourite beer
1 TBSP Salt
2 TBSP Red Pepper Flakes
1 TSP Ground Black Pepper
1/4 Cup Dark Brown Sugar

Mix all sauce ingredients in saucepan, bring to boil. Reduce heat to simmer and simmer 30 minutes, uncovered.

Once pork is pulled and chopped, mix in large bowl with sauce
 
I really haven't found anything to beat this, but I am always open to trying new stuff and almost always like what I try. 
 
When it comes to brisket and other beef, I am still searching for "the perfect sauce," but have many that I like to use and that are very good.
 
For chicken, it's hard to beat teriyaki, in many forms - but there is a simple-yet-delicious-looking lime-Buffalo-style sauce that I want to try, as well.
 
For burgers, I'm not picky ~ anything will do, and sometimes simply some grilled onions, ketchup and pickles are enough.
 
For steaks, I lean toward the teriyaki, with a healthy dose of grilled onions and mushrooms, or a reduced red-wine-type sauce.
 
Actually, after re-reading this reply, the things I have listed really don't do my tastes justice ~ the only thing that I really use consistently is the Eastern Carolina pulled pork finishing sauce - when it comes to everything else, I like to experiment, and really don't have a go-to antying - rather, I use a "method," and change up the ingredients. This is especially true when it comes to mops, bastes and glazes for pork ribs.
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