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Filmjölk (yogurt)

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pitrow View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote pitrow Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 07 February 2018 at 14:32
I wonder if it's just going to take a couple more batches for it to really take off. 
Mike
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote pitrow Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 08 February 2018 at 10:25
Update on my batch #3. When I got home there wasn't any change, which is what I expected. It was still like milk. So just for kicks I took it out and put it on top of the water heater, which can get pretty warm, especially if it's running and the furnace next to it is running also. I measured it in the 80s the other day. Anyway by bed time it was still milky and still a bit cold having not warmed up from the fridge completely yet.

This morning when checking it, it's definitely changed. Not completely set like it had been before, but for sure thicker. More like heavy cream. Since I had to leave for work and didn't want it going any further it went back into the fridge.

I'm curious to see how this turns out now. This is the first time I've been able to catch it before it goes all the way to custard, so maybe, if this turns out ok, I need to work on better timing for it and catching it before the culturing goes too far.

But that all hinges on what it's like when I get home tonight.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote pitrow Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09 February 2018 at 09:27
To continue the saga of batch number three...

when I arrived home this evening past, and peered in upon the container of batch #3, no changes were noted in it from the morning. However a quick swirl revealed that it was back to it's original milk consistency, with just a bit of scum (for lack of a better term) on top. That scum quickly coagulated together into a long stringy mass and floated around near the top. No noticeable smell nor flavors were detected. I did a quick finger dip (risking contamination) and tasted it but it had almost no flavor at all. If anything a little like watered down milk.

Once again, I took it out and set it on the pellet stove for the evening. I did not care to check it when I went to bed, however this morning it had congealed into it's usual custard-like consistency. At the risk of sounding like a broken record, we'll see what it looks like when I get home, but I'm expecting it to be the same as the previous batches, it just took longer to get there due to the naps in the fridge.

Other than putting this batch in the fridge sooner, I did also do one thing different with this batch. I doubled up the amount of starter yogurt from batch 2. They call for one tablespoon per cup, but I used 4 tablespoons in 2 cups of milk, to see if that would make it set faster. It did not seem to have any effect on the timeline.

I'm planning on starting batch #4 tonight, and will be home all weekend, so hopefully I can catch it at that moment when it first starts to congeal and see if that makes any difference in the separation, though I'm not really expecting it based on Brook's note above.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09 February 2018 at 09:43
I'm starting to wonder if the "custard-like consistency" is the norm with these, based on the reading and photos here:

https://www.culturesforhealth.com/learn/yogurt/counter-top-yogurt-starters-video/

I started my Piimä Wednesday evening and it hit the 36-hour mark this morning. I had intended to put it in the refrigerator at that time, regardless of how it looked, but forgot to. When I get home after work, we should still be an hour or two before the 48-hour mark, and I will put it in the refrigerator at that time. By the sounds of it, I should stir it right before putting it in the refrigerator...or perhaps not?

One thing about the Piimä culture that I started: I had no milk on hand, but I did have just enough heavy cream (long story); the instructions for Piimä state that you can use heavy cream in order to make a thicker version that has a consistency similar to sour cream, so I figured it would be worth a try.

Chances are that I will still be up and around when the 6 hours is up, so I will sample it then. I'll also begin a separate thread for the Piimä and fill in all of the details.


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote pitrow Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09 February 2018 at 10:04
Ron, I don't stir mine when I put it in the fridge. At least with mine, the moment you stir it it breaks into mostly liquid with some chunks and begins to separate into curds and whey. Though maybe I should be stirring it, would be worth a try one one of these batches.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09 February 2018 at 10:13
It sounds like Brook has been stirring his, and the results are identical to yours.

My guess (and that's all it is, right now) is that perhaps some whey is supposed to be poured off, until the yoghurt reaches the preferred or "normal" consistency. I could easily be wrong, though.

Since we live here in the USA and are conditioned to thicker yoghurt, our expectations might be different than the actual reality. For instance, the Piimä is described as quite thin and "drinkable" - indeed, most reading suggests that it is closer in consistency to what we would expect from buttermilk than yoghurt. The Viili is described as having a thicker consistency, so perhaps that one will look more as we (as Americans) expect it to?

I have a connection with a fellow on FaceBook who is deep into the re-emerging Scandinavian butter culture, which I assume must cross over quite frequently with the types of fermented milks we are all working with. I might see if I can consult him and learn a few things.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote pitrow Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09 February 2018 at 10:20
I've been doing a little research on the filmjölk on youtube and it seems there's varied thoughts on the consistency.

for example this one, shows it to be slightly more liquidy than US yogurt is, almost drinkable, but very smooth.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sAs1eonZaD4

Also this one that has a similar texture to the above
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o964Ql53i_U

Then there's this one that is a little thicker, but on the verge of 'chunky' similar to how mine is, but mine has a lot more liquid with it. At the 40 second mark is a good shot of her using the previous batch to start a new one, and you get a good shot of the texture. Almost like cottage cheese, where mine is closer to curds and whey. From about 42 seconds on where it shows the finished, plated bowl of yogurt it's very smooth and creamy looking and I almost wonder if they used a different yogurt for the 'money shot'.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pkkXXXh_vDA

Cultures for Health's own video show it even closer to what mine is, though theirs is thicker and less separated but you can definitely see the curds in it. Watch at about 1:20 when she scoops the starter out to feed the new batch.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mzEYIfRHBC0
That's pretty close to mine, but a bit less separated for sure. I'll try to get a picture, or video even of mine tonight so we can compare.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote pitrow Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 February 2018 at 11:02
Final update on batch #3

After it's allotted time in the fridge, I gave it a good stir and was surprised that this one is less 'curdy'.  While there are some curds to it, on the whole it's rather creamy. Still not as thick as what we usually think of when thinking yogurt, but at this point it's a very nice drinkable yogurt.

I started batch 4 friday evening, with about 2 1/2 tables spoons from batch 3 and a little over 2 cups of milk. It sat in it's usual place on the stove until I checked it Saturday afternoon. To my surprise it had already started to congeal. Not as much as usual, but there was a definite thickening and a start of pulling away from the sides when tipped. So I put it in the fridge to cool.

Sunday morning came and I took a look at it and was a bit disappointed. There was a bit of a scum on the top and it seemed to have converted back to a liquid state, no pull from the sides at all. So I gave it a good stir and put it back on the stove to see what happens. And, then I totally forgot about it. I forgot to check it when I went to bed and I forgot to check it again this morning before I left. Ugh. So hopefully it's still ok by the time I get home.

So far it seems that if I put it in the fridge before it's fully set to the custard stage it falls back into liquid so from here out I will let it go to the full set and just deal with the separation as it happens.

I'm hoping that the creaminess of batch 3 continues to happen, I'm thinking that maybe the culture just needed a couple batches to acclimate to my milk and environment.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote pitrow Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14 February 2018 at 09:38
This will probably be my last update on the filmjölk, unless something out of the ordinary happens.

Batch 4 came out much like batch 3. More smooth than the previous batches, and less separation of the curds and whey. It's still very liquidy though, especially since I keep pouring successive batches on top of what's left of the previous batches. I'm hoping over time it will continue to thicken though.

The flavor is becoming more pronounced as well. It has a bit of a sour note now, and the 'cheese' that's described in the literature is definitely coming out now. If the texture firms up some I can definitely see this being good as a topping for fruit. Right now I usually just mix in some honey and drink it.

Hopefully things will continue to progress nicely. For those of you trying this yourself, I suggest giving it a couple batches before passing judgement on it.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14 February 2018 at 09:42
Sounds good, Mike - and thanks for the updates; I'll be trying this one myself before too long, and it's good to have some reference.

When you start the Viili, be sure to let us know how it goes. I'll have an update on my Piimä soon - just need time to put it together!

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote pitrow Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 24 May 2018 at 11:35
Just dropping by for a quick note...

I while ago I caught an episode of Good Eats where he's making yogurt, and while I tend to take Alton's musings with a grain of salt he did mention that he prefers to make yogurt with 2% milk as whole milk has so much fat that it gets in the way of coagulation and 1% and non-fat don't have enough fat to congeal properly. Now, I've been using whole milk as that's what we have on hand for the kids, so on a whim I bought a quart of 2% and used that to top up my yogurt when it was low. To my surprise that batch was definitely thicker than my usual stuff. And after that batch I went back to the whole milk and it was more runny again. So he might be on to something there.


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Margi Cintrano Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26 May 2018 at 09:06

I am uncertain if this would assist, however, I have made my own  Ricotta ..  Recipe is:

1) Very slowly bring 2 quarts of  whole cow¬īs milk, 1 cup of heavy cream, and 1 / 2 tsp of salt to a Rolling boil, in a  6 Quart heavy pot over moderate, note:  moderate heat and stir frequently to prevent scortching.   
2) Add 3 tblsps.  of fresh lemon juice, and reduce the heat to low and simmer, stirring constantly until the mixture is curd-less, about 2 minutes ..  
3) Pour this mixture into a lined sieve and let it drain 1 hour.   
4)  After, discarding the liquid, chill the Ricotta and keep covered.   It shall keep 2 days refrigerated .. 

Now, I have no idea how different making yogurt or Greek Yogurt ( the only yogurt I like ) is, however, I am assuming it is not too too different ..   

Definitely an amazingly fascinating article ..   That you all, for posting ..  
www.guidepost.es
Gourmet¬īs Choice - Time Out In Spain ...

WEBSITE: www.visionsgourmandes.com
www.issuu.com / Beyond Taste, Oltre il Gusto ..
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