Foods of the World Forum Homepage
Forum Home Forum Home > Oceania and the Pacific Islands > The Islands of Oceania and the South Pacific
  New Posts New Posts RSS Feed - Fish kokoda
  FAQ FAQ  Forum Search   Events   Register Register  Login Login

This site is completely supported by donations; there are no corporate sponsors. We would be honoured if you would consider a small donation, to be used exclusively for forum expenses.



Thank you, from the Foods of the World Forums!

Fish kokoda

 Post Reply Post Reply
Author
Message
kiwi View Drop Down
Chef's Apprentice
Chef's Apprentice
Avatar

Joined: 16 February 2010
Status: Offline
Points: 402
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote kiwi Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: Fish kokoda
    Posted: 17 February 2010 at 19:16
So, I thought I'd kick off this area with my take on an island style raw fish recipe. I'm lucky enough to live in a country surrounded by the ocean, and I do a lot of spearfishing and freediving so fish is on the menu frequently. This is a great one to get people used to the idea of eating raw fish - Just call it fish salad and watch them gobble it up LOL I always try and shoot a couple of smaller fish specifically for this recipe, they tend to have sweeter meat. I don't have any photos to show you, but next time I make it I'll document the process with pics.

~750g of a nice FRESH white fleshed fish fillets, skinned and boned - I use snapper or greenbone, roughly 3-4 small fillets.
Juice of 4-5 limes (can use lemon)
Half a red onion, diced fine
1 large red chilli, de-seeded and diced fine (can add addition cayenne pepper for extra spice)

Dice the fish into roughly 1cm cubes. Place in a large bowl with the red onion, lime juice and chilli, stir, and leave in the fridge for between 4 to 12 hours. The time effects the end texture of the fish, and the amount of 'fishiness' in the taste (more time = firmer, more citrus flavour than fish). The fish will go white, as it is 'cooked' by the acids. The citrus juice should cover the fish. Stir occasionally.

When it is 'done', add
150mls of coconut cream,
chopped vegetables to a roughly equal volume of the fish, my favourites are red peppers, spring onion, courgettes, seeded tomatoes.
Salt and pepper to taste.

Chill for an additional hour, then serve in bowls with a lining of lettuce leaves, and an optional garnish of lime zest.


Hope you enjoy it, it's a crowd favourite round here.
Kiwi

kai time!
Back to Top
Sponsored Links


Back to Top
TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar

Joined: 25 January 2010
Location: Chinook, MT
Status: Offline
Points: 9125
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 February 2010 at 21:16
that looks really good - thanks for posting!
 
i'd like to give it a try sometime ~ i'm guessing that the coconut cream balances very well with the hot pepper. is this something that will work with freshwater fish as well, or should it be saltwater?
Back to Top
kiwi View Drop Down
Chef's Apprentice
Chef's Apprentice
Avatar

Joined: 16 February 2010
Status: Offline
Points: 402
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote kiwi Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 February 2010 at 02:42
I imagine it would depend a bit on the freshwater fish in question. I would have thought they vary drastically in taste over different areas. Round these parts we really only have salmon (which I don't think would work very well) and trout, which I think would probably be too delicate a flavour to stand up to this sort of treatment... But don't let me stand in the way of experimentation! For a more delicately flavoured fish, I'd go for a shorter marinating time with the citrus and chilli.

Forgot to add - an interesting Thai-inspired twist on this is adding fresh corriander and a touch of lemongrass.

Cheers
Kiwi
kai time!
Back to Top
Hoser View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar

Joined: 06 February 2010
Location: Cumberland, RI
Status: Offline
Points: 3405
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Hoser Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 February 2010 at 02:48
This is on my must do list for sure!
Go ahead...play with your food!
Back to Top
Montana Maddness View Drop Down
Cook
Cook
Avatar

Joined: 24 February 2010
Location: G.F. MT.
Status: Offline
Points: 99
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Montana Maddness Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26 February 2010 at 15:34
Hey I bet Northern pike would work great!
Hotter the better bring on the peppers!
Back to Top
Margi Cintrano View Drop Down
Master Chef
Master Chef
Avatar

Joined: 03 February 2012
Location: Spain
Status: Offline
Points: 6014
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Margi Cintrano Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09 December 2012 at 13:32
Tas: Shrimp would be lovely however, shorter marinating time advised. It is a ceviche type dish with Asian flair.   Margi.
www.guidepost.es
Gourmet´s Choice - Time Out In Spain ...

WEBSITE: www.visionsgourmandes.com
www.issuu.com / Beyond Taste, Oltre il Gusto ..
Back to Top
Feather View Drop Down
Cook
Cook


Joined: 21 October 2012
Location: USA
Status: Offline
Points: 221
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Feather Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09 December 2012 at 13:45
Originally posted by Montana Maddness Montana Maddness wrote:

Hey I bet Northern pike would work great!


I have heard, ocean fish, are safer to eat, in a sashimi situation or a ceviche situation because it is growing in salt water (the ocean). Fresh water fish like northern pike (which I love), I've been told, needs to be frozen, to guard against parasites. I'm no expert in that area but I'd try to be on the safe side and freeze it first for a few days, to be sure not to ingest parasites.

I wish I had more information to share with you, but I'm not that expert in that area. ~Feather
Back to Top
HistoricFoodie View Drop Down
Master Chef
Master Chef


Joined: 21 February 2012
Location: Kentucky
Status: Offline
Points: 4640
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09 December 2012 at 20:22
I don't know where you've heard that, Feather, but it's simply untrue.
 
Thank about it. What would make you think that there are no parasites living in the ocean?
 
I've eaten more than my share of fresh-water fish, and have never had an infected one that I'm aware of.
 
Back to Top
Margi Cintrano View Drop Down
Master Chef
Master Chef
Avatar

Joined: 03 February 2012
Location: Spain
Status: Offline
Points: 6014
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Margi Cintrano Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10 December 2012 at 08:13
Brook and Feather,    
I have lived in numerous large populated cities in South America, The USA and The Mediterranean. The Immune System or Defense System must be taken care of. We eat alot more ocean fish than meat and both of us are 100% healthy. Look at the Japanese. 
Every thing has bacteria and germs ! However, I agree with Brook regarding the fact that the oceans have a tremendous amount of dumping and oilspills, by ignortants and so do lakes rivers etcetra, what does not have bacteria ?
 
Where there are people there are bacteria positive and negative.
 
Interesting topic, while I am enjoying my Japanese Sashimi take out; as I had no time to stop for lunch, with our editorial loads for the January Edition.
 
I believe it is one´s Immune System; and I have never met a Spaniard or Portuguese person who has been ill from eating the top selling fish in Spain and Portugal; Cod Fish, served in over 365 ways, one for each day, including a Carpacchio and a Marinated raw appetiser.  
 
Beef:
Interesting that many USA restaurants, suggest, and prepare that you have a medium rare steak ! Then, they can pay for it too ! 
 
I only like my steak blue rare or rare depending on the cut and the if it is BBQ Grilled or grilled  on stove flame in skillet ... and which country I am in as well.
 
So, this is all about personal choice, and here, you go to a bar, or restaurant, and when you pay, you can have ur meat anyway you decide ... We take a drive, and go 3 hours to Valencia, to Vigo, Galicia  and catch up with the fishermen ... Place on Ice in ice chest in Jeep 4 wheel drive, and drive home with the catch. Wash and Prepare ...
 
Good thread. Interesting, and as said, before, controversial topic.
 
Feather: I love fresh oysters and clams ... We enjoy them in Italia and Galicia, Spain in northwest or Brittany - France.
 
Kindest,
Margi.
www.guidepost.es
Gourmet´s Choice - Time Out In Spain ...

WEBSITE: www.visionsgourmandes.com
www.issuu.com / Beyond Taste, Oltre il Gusto ..
Back to Top
Feather View Drop Down
Cook
Cook


Joined: 21 October 2012
Location: USA
Status: Offline
Points: 221
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Feather Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10 December 2012 at 08:48
Don't get me wrong, I love ceviche and sashimi, and I have eaten them in at least 4 different states. I also make sushi and sashimi at home.

I thought I read somewhere that fresh water fish, were more dangerous than salt water fish--and if I find the source I'll bring it up. The usual treatment is to freeze the fish for 7 days at -4 degrees F before using. And -35 degrees F for 15 hours. (Home freezers usually do not freeze at low enough temperatures.)

Here are two articles on a quick search.
The first one mentions the freezing method and pike  (type of fish).
http://seafoodhealthfacts.org/seafood_safety/patients/parasites.php
The second article talks more about the types of parasites and infections.
http://suite101.com/article/human-parasites-in-raw-fish-a138279

One of my favorite meals was a fabulous spread of seafood, raw scallops and shrimp and shrimp roe fresh from the ocean we used in making rolled sushi, while visiting friends in Alaska, among the 10 or so dishes we prepared. Another great meal was started with raw oysters and a type of clam, served before the blue crabs (main dish) while visiting friends in the Chesapeake Bay MD area.

Food for thought. ~Feather
Back to Top
HistoricFoodie View Drop Down
Master Chef
Master Chef


Joined: 21 February 2012
Location: Kentucky
Status: Offline
Points: 4640
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10 December 2012 at 08:49
One possibility might be a form of circular reasoning.
 
Because fresh water fisheries have always been protected, and, until recently, salt water fisheries not (I'm talking North America, now), most commercial fisheries were based on ocean fish.
 
So, the faulty reasoning could have been: we eat more salt water fish than fresh water. Therefore, salt water fish must be healtier. Therefore, fresh water fish are unhealthy.
 
Sounds ludicrous, when phrased like that. But it is, sadly, exactly how people reason out food preferences. You wouldn't believe, for instance, some of the explanations I've heard for why we don't eat game in America. And why farm-raised deer are different from wild ones.
 
The real secret to a shashimi application (or any other raw situation) is that the fish be as fresh as possible. Second secret: An incredibly sharp knife, to absolutely minimize cell damage.
Back to Top
Feather View Drop Down
Cook
Cook


Joined: 21 October 2012
Location: USA
Status: Offline
Points: 221
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Feather Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10 December 2012 at 08:55
From the first link:
"Two types of parasitic worms can infect humans:

1. Anisakiasis is caused by ingesting the larvae of several types of roundworm which are found in saltwater fish such as cod, plaice, halibut, rockfish, herring, Pollock, sea bass and flounder.

2. Tapeworm infections occur after ingesting the larvae of diphyllobothrium which is found in freshwater fish such as pike, perch and anadromous (fresh-saltwater) fish such as salmon."


1. I haven't tried the salt water fish listed in (1), mostly shell fish have been on my menu for raw applications.
2. Mentions specifically Pike, which is what brought this to mind for me.
Back to Top
HistoricFoodie View Drop Down
Master Chef
Master Chef


Joined: 21 February 2012
Location: Kentucky
Status: Offline
Points: 4640
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10 December 2012 at 09:17
Notice, please, that of the two types of parasites that could affect humans, one comes from saltwater fish and one from fresh. So neither is more nor less dangerous than the other.
 
But to me, the key sentance in that entire article is: The health risk from parasites is far less than the risk from “unseen” illness causing bacteria which are present in almost all foods.
In other words, the risk is very small to begin with. I would love to see the raw data on how many cases or either are reported each year.
 
Personally, if I were concerned, I'd stop eating raw fish altogether, rather than face the quality losses inherent in freezing and thawing. But that's me. You have to make your own choices.
 
In practical terms, btw, the only way of destroying these parasites is cooking. Few home freezers operate at less than 0 degrees F, and most don't go that low. Yet, according to the literature, to destroy these parasites by freezing requires sustained temperatures of from -4F to -20C. Thus, freezing the fish at home merely provides a false sense of security.
 
The simple fact is, you haven't been infected not because you froze the seafood, but because the parasites weren't present in the first place.
Back to Top
Margi Cintrano View Drop Down
Master Chef
Master Chef
Avatar

Joined: 03 February 2012
Location: Spain
Status: Offline
Points: 6014
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Margi Cintrano Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10 December 2012 at 09:52
Feather,
 
The best cebiche, I have ever had was in Miraflores, Lima, Perú at Gaston y Astrid´s Cebechería, a cebiche bar. He is quite like Grant Achatz in Chicago or Catalan Chef Ferrán Adriá & /or José Andrés; however, of Peru. Owns several restaurants in Madrid Capital as well as Mexico D.F, Buenos Aires, Sao Paulo, Rio de Janiero, Santiago de Chile, and San Francisco, California too. NYC too if I am not mistaken.  
 
Chef Alex Atala of Sao Paulo, Brazil ( 4th best restaurant in the world, according to London Restaurant Magazine 2012 ) is also does a "Mean" ceviche ... Cebiche in Perú is spelt with a "B".  
 
His cebiche was to die and go to heaven for. Interesting, he prepares 100 different cebiche varieties. I love the prawns ( shrimps ) with sweet potato. If you wish, take a look in SOUTH AMERICA SECTION as I posted his recipe.
 
Thanks for posting all the articles on the subject topic. Shall print and read enroute to Magazine Office tomorrow on the Bus ...
 
Kindest.
Margi.
 
 
www.guidepost.es
Gourmet´s Choice - Time Out In Spain ...

WEBSITE: www.visionsgourmandes.com
www.issuu.com / Beyond Taste, Oltre il Gusto ..
Back to Top
Feather View Drop Down
Cook
Cook


Joined: 21 October 2012
Location: USA
Status: Offline
Points: 221
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Feather Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10 December 2012 at 10:29
Although rare, this article talks about eating raw fresh water fish in certain areas of the world causing liver cancer and death.
This is exactly the kind of article that makes me believe that fresh water raw fish is more dangerous than salt water raw fish.

http://news.discovery.com/human/fish-parasite-cancer.html

This article focuses on tape worms especially related to salmon--fresh water and salt water fish, causing health problems.

http://abcnews.go.com/Health/GlobalHealth/story?id=7847413&page=1

I don't believe the 'all or nothing' approach is necessary, to never eat raw fish or to keep eating all raw fish. Between the viruses, toxins and parasites--careful food handling, freshness, and information about the kinds of raw fish and the risks are important to know.



Back to Top
 Post Reply Post Reply
  Share Topic   

Forum Jump Forum Permissions View Drop Down



This page was generated in 0.061 seconds.