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Fish On Smoked Eggplant Puree

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    Posted: 24 August 2015 at 20:16
Tom Kerridge is a publican in the north of England. Nowadays we’d probably call his place a gastropub, due to its emphasis on fine food. Tom’s food and atmosphere is so good, in fact, that he’s earned two Michelin stars.

Not bad for a bar.

I learned this recipe from him, recently, but adapted it, perhaps radically, for two reasons: First, the original used monkfish---which is rarely available here, and, when it is, takes a second mortgage to afford. I substituted swordfish, another dense, meaty fish, which worked out well.

Second, Tom provided ingredients, but not precise amounts. So I had to figure those out on my own. Which means my dish may or may not taste quite like his. Either way, however, it’s a great dish.

Swordfish (or Monkfish) On Smoked Eggplant Puree

4 six-ounce swordfish filets, skin off
2 eggplant
2 tbls cumin seed
2 tbls coriander seed
EVOO
Cream
2 lemons, divided use
1 cup green olives, chopped
¼ cup capers
3-4 anchovy filets, chopped
1 red chili, minced
¼ cup chopped parsley

Roast eggplants, preferably over charcoal, until soft. Alternatively, roast in oven and add about a tablespoon of liquid smoke to the final puree. Scrape the flesh out of the skins and chop by hand. Hand chopping is an important step, as the puree won’t release its moisture if done in a food process. Let drain overnight in fridge.

Toast and grind cumin and coriander seeds. Heat about a teaspoon each in a little olive oil. Mix in the puree and add enough cream to form a mashed potato-like texture. Squeeze in some lemon juice.

Coat the fish in remaining spice mix. Brown on all sides in a little olive oil. Add a knob of butter. Cook, basting, until cooked through, about 8 minutes. Pour sauce over filets. Set aside to rest.

Make the salsa: Combine chopped olives, capers, chopped anchovies, minced chili and parsley. Add a squeeze of lemon juice.

Serve fish on a bed of puree, topped with salsa and another squeeze of lemon juice if desired (I skipped it).. Tom Kerridge garnishes the dish with celery leaves, which is a nice touch.
But we hae meat and we can eat
And sae the Lord be thanket
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Hoser Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 25 August 2015 at 02:20
Dang it....just grilled swordfish the other day. Well, I'm in new england....guess I'll have to get some more.
Recipe sound really nice Brook.

Go ahead...play with your food!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 25 August 2015 at 10:34
I'm thinking this might go nicely with bluefish, too, Dave. Another fish that isn't available around here, alas.
But we hae meat and we can eat
And sae the Lord be thanket
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote drinks Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26 August 2015 at 15:27
Eggplant, pardon me while I exit the room.
The only way I can stand eggplant is to grow the little finger size oriental ones and then , split, corn meal and fast fry.
I know, I am just old and gripy.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Effigy Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11 September 2015 at 02:12
Here we know Swordfish as Marlin.
Marlin! Cumin and marlin? Why is my nose wrinkling?Why would you?
Here marlin tastes of ozone and energy.
Cumin is fusty.
Why?

Tell me please.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote drinks Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11 September 2015 at 13:08
Sword fish, a bill fish,but not in the same family as sailfish and marlin.
Sword fish is Xiphias gladius, only member of the group.
Sailfish and marlin are in the family Istiophoridea, with about 10 species.
What is the scientific name of the fish caught in NZ?
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Effigy Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11 September 2015 at 21:10

From:  http://www.teara.govt.nz/en/oceanic-fish/page-3

The term billfish is used for marlin and their relatives. They are large migratory fish, with a distinctive upper jaw that forms a pointed spear or bill. Along with the swordfish, five species are known to frequent New Zealand waters seasonally.

Marlin

Marlin are likely to feed on a broad range of pelagic fish and squid, and small tuna in open waters. Nearer the coast, they also eat bottom-dwelling fish. Marlin are caught commercially, and are sought by anglers fishing off the northern North Island.

In the past, marlin were rumoured to make unprovoked attacks on boats. It is more probable that the fish were lashing out with their bills as fishermen hauled them into the boat.

Striped marlin

The striped marlin (Tetrapturus audax) occurs in cooler waters and is the most abundant marlin around New Zealand. It grows up to 3.5 metres long and weighs up to 180 kilograms, but averages around 130 kilograms.

Blue marlin

Blue marlin (Makaira mazara) taken from New Zealand waters average around 100–200 kilograms. The heaviest caught in New Zealand was 412 kilograms. Like other marlin, they arrive in the peak of summer and are known from the Bay of Plenty northwards, most notably off Northland’s east coast.

Black marlin

The large black marlin (Makaira indica) typically weighs between 100 and 200 kilograms and is around 2–3 metres in length. The heaviest caught in New Zealand was 444 kilograms. These fish are widespread in the tropical and subtropical waters of the Indian and Pacific oceans.

Swordfish

The broadbill swordfish (Xiphias gladius) is widely distributed and moves from tropical to temperate waters. Although it swims near the surface, it is thought to descend to deeper waters. The bill, which is longer and flatter than the marlin’s, is used for defence and to herd, stun and slice prey such as squid and small fish.

The average length is 2–3 metres. Specimens weighing 100–300 kilograms are taken by anglers off the New Zealand coast.

Commercial fishing of the species is now prohibited, so any swordfish catch is taken by boats fishing for other species such as tuna.

Other billfish occasionally seen in New Zealand waters include the shortbill spearfish (Tetrapturus angustirostris) and the sailfish (Istiophorus platypterus).


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I have learned something! Thanks Drinks.

I have only eaten striped and black marlin, my nephew catches them in season and if in the right place at the right time a couple of kilos of smoked marlin come my way. It is very good.

I am curious to try this Brook, reading through that puree recipe again, I think it sounds really interesting. Cumin seeds with fish...who knew? Fresh monkfish is available regularly, at the local supermarket too.

Are we talking big purple aubergines here? Or the smaller variegated ones?

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 September 2015 at 06:41
Possibly not found in your waters, there's also a White Marlin, in the Atlantic. I was unfamiliar with Striped Marlin, though.

Smallest of the important billfishes is the Sailfish, which basically looks like a miniature marlin.

As to the eggplants, I don't think it matters much. Personally, I prefer the smaller, variegated and Asian varieties, as they have more inherent flavor.

Don't forget, too, that after toasting the cumin and coriander get ground.

Essentially, we're talking about North African flavors here. Wouldn't surprise me if Ras el Hanout would make an interesting variation on the theme.
But we hae meat and we can eat
And sae the Lord be thanket
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