Foods of the World Forum Homepage
Forum Home Forum Home > Other Food-Related Topics > Around the Kitchen Table
  New Posts New Posts RSS Feed - Foods done Oddly - a venture into Molecular Gastro
  FAQ FAQ  Forum Search   Events   Register Register  Login Login

This site is completely supported by donations; there are no corporate sponsors. We would be honoured if you would consider a small donation, to be used exclusively for forum expenses.



Thank you, from the Foods of the World Forums!

Foods done Oddly - a venture into Molecular Gastro

 Post Reply Post Reply Page  12>
Author
Message
gonefishin View Drop Down
Master Chef
Master Chef
Avatar

Joined: 20 September 2012
Status: Offline
Points: 1773
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote gonefishin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: Foods done Oddly - a venture into Molecular Gastro
    Posted: 20 March 2013 at 13:44
   Hi All!

   I have just been venturing into the world of Molecular Gastronomy.  It's an odd world of flavors done lightly, intensified, separate and combined into new forms.  I basically have little experience with this stuff, but I'm intrigued about the possibilities...and have just gotten some of the "tools" to start making my food...well, different.

   Is there anyone else here who has experience into this strange world? 

   Love to hear your stories and see your creations!

Dan
Enjoy The Food!
Back to Top
gonefishin View Drop Down
Master Chef
Master Chef
Avatar

Joined: 20 September 2012
Status: Offline
Points: 1773
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gonefishin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20 March 2013 at 13:49
 

MALTODEXTRIN by http://molecule-r.com

Function

Maltodextrin is an unsweet sugar that can be flavored in many different ways and then sprinkled over any dish; there are endless possibilities in molecular gastronomy!

 

Origin

Maltodextrins are polysaccharides, which is to say, sugars. They are obtained through partial hydrolysis (or decomposition) of corn, wheat, potato or tapioca starch. In order to understand what maltodextrins are, one needs to understand how sugar is made from a molecular standpoint. The most simple sugar molecules, those directely assimilable by our body, are either called glucose molecules or dextrose molecules. They are obtained through the enzimatic decomposition of longuer sugar molecule chains, as it is the case during the digestive process. The indicator used to measure the hydrolysis degree of sugars is called ‘Dextrose Equivalent’ (DE). DE ranges from 0 to 100 where 0 corresponds to untransformed starch and 100 corresponds to simple dextrose molecules, which is to say, entirely hydrolysed sugar. On this scale, refined sugar of the type generally used in the kitchen occupies the 92 to 99 range. Syrups, such as corn syrup, have a DE between 20 and 91. Maltodextrins have a DE below 20, which is to say that they range between starch and syrups.

During the digestive process, maltodextrins are broken down into simple dextrose (or glucose) molecules so that they can be assimilated by the body.

For the industrial production of maltodextrins, starch hydrolysis is achieved through a solution containing enzymes. When the desired degree of hydrolysis is reached, enzymes are neutralysed by the addition of sulfites to the solution. The solution is then purified in order to keep only the maltodextrin, which is then dried.

 

Properties

Even though maltrodextrin is a sugar, it’s taste is only slightly sweet, and it is odorless. Maltodextrin dissolves easily into water, can absorbs a good quantity of oil and is easily digestible, among other properties. Moreover, it can be treated so that it can be used as an encapsulating or swelling agent. 

 

Industry applications

Maltodextrin is a significant part of the content of powdered energy drinks used by athletes. It is also often used as filler in manufactured foods. Furthermore, its properties make it an excellent aroma carrier. This is mainly how it is used in creative cooking.

Maltodextrine is also a frequent excipient (non active agent) in pharmacology: it is used in the making of many drugs to which it provides desired properties such as taste, shape or solubility. 

 

Creative cooking applications

Maltodextrin is mostly used in creative cooking as an aroma carrier. When a good quantity of maltodextrin is mixed with fatty ingredients such as hazelnut oil, bacon fat or melted chocolate for example, the maltodextrin absorbs this ingredient while retaining it’s powdered form. The result is a whole range of tasty powders that can be sprinkled over food preparations and dishes.

By varying proportions of maltodextrin and chosen ingredient, and by mixing less, tasty maltodextrin « chunks » can be made. Since maltodextrin is a sugar, the chunks can then be heated up in a pan in order to caramelize their exterior and make them crunchy.

 

Tips and tricks

Maltodextrin can be mixed with gelling agents in order to facilitate their dispersion in liquids. Gelatin soluble in cold water can thus be mixed with maltodextrin instead of powdered sugar so that the same solubility is reached with minimal added sweetness.



Enjoy The Food!
Back to Top
TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar

Joined: 25 January 2010
Location: Chinook, MT
Status: Offline
Points: 8819
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20 March 2013 at 13:52
I'm afraid I have no real experience to share, Dan - but I am interested in reading the replies. The only thing I've done that even comes close (and I don't think this really counts) is when I glued two deer roasts together in order to make bresaola di cervo:
 
 
This is a pretty far cry from what you describe in your opening post, but it's the closest thing I have.
 
If you are a visitor and like what you see, please click here and join the discussions in our community!
Back to Top
gonefishin View Drop Down
Master Chef
Master Chef
Avatar

Joined: 20 September 2012
Status: Offline
Points: 1773
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gonefishin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20 March 2013 at 13:53

Converting High-fat Liquids into Powder by http://www.molecularrecipes.com


Another technique of molecular gastronomy chefs is to convert liquids with high fat content into powder using a specific type of Tapioca Maltodextrin called N-Zorbit M. This type of Tapioca Maltodextrin is derived from tapioca that has been specially designed to have a very low bulk density. It is very light, so be careful when you open the recipient with the Maltodextrin or your kitchen will end up covered in white powder.

Tapioca Maltodextrin is used in the food industry to increase the volume of dry mixes and frozen foods. It is moderately sweet or almost flavorless. In molecular gastronomy, Tapioca Maltodextrin is used to stabilize high fat ingredients which can then be transformed into powders. This technique is very easy and will definitely surprise your diners. It is a great way of transforming regular ingredients from liquid or solid into powder to add a new dimension to your dish. The powder melts in your mouth as soon as it gets in contact with your tongue. The sensation is pretty cool.


 Olive Oil Powder

The process of converting a high-fat liquid into powder is very simple. The high fat ingredient should be liquefied first if it is solid, chilled and then mixed with Tapioca Maltodextrin using a starting ratio of 60% fat to 40% Tapioca Maltodextrin. More Tapioca Maltodextrin should be added if necessary. To make the powder fluffier, it is then usually passed through a tamis.

These are some example of powders created by molecular gastronomy chefs:

Olive Oil Powder

Caramel Powder

Nutella Powder

Coconut oil Powder

Bacon Powder

Peanut Butter Powder

White Chocolate Powder

Enjoy The Food!
Back to Top
TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar

Joined: 25 January 2010
Location: Chinook, MT
Status: Offline
Points: 8819
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20 March 2013 at 14:10
I've seen this used on a few of the "foodie" competition shows lately, and find it pretty interesting.
 
I wonder how a "pil-pil powder" would be received? It would certainly change the traditional look of the dish, but perhaps in a good way. That, and/or perhaps chile-and-garlic "caviar" similar to the beer caviar you made during your recent attempt:
 
 






 
 
If you are a visitor and like what you see, please click here and join the discussions in our community!
Back to Top
gonefishin View Drop Down
Master Chef
Master Chef
Avatar

Joined: 20 September 2012
Status: Offline
Points: 1773
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gonefishin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20 March 2013 at 14:29
  Here's a few examples from my friends house...

  

Reverse frozen Spherification (thin gel with liquid center).  This is Sparkling grape juice with carbonated sugar (like pop rocks)





Smoked Salmon with Mango Cilantro Caviar. 



Malto, discussed above



  Slice of Apple with Peanut Butter Powder



   Peanut Butter Powder and Chocolate Powder together - peanut butter cup



    This was the homemade lobster ravioli in a Vietnamese broth with Sriracha Caviar.  These little things can not only provide a nice texture, but they can provide a big flavor pop as well (depending on what you use)



Zombie Dust is an IPA from 3Floyds brewery.  Zombie Dust Caviar



Making the Zombie Dust Caviar



   Some salt cod with Zombie Dust Caviar on top



   That's just a few for now Wink
Enjoy The Food!
Back to Top
gonefishin View Drop Down
Master Chef
Master Chef
Avatar

Joined: 20 September 2012
Status: Offline
Points: 1773
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gonefishin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20 March 2013 at 14:32
Originally posted by TasunkaWitko TasunkaWitko wrote:

I've seen this used on a few of the "foodie" competition shows lately, and find it pretty interesting.
 
I wonder how a "pil-pil powder" would be received? It would certainly change the traditional look of the dish, but perhaps in a good way. That, and/or perhaps chile-and-garlic "caviar" similar to the beer caviar you made during your recent attempt:

 


    You've got the idea Tas! 

Wink
Enjoy The Food!
Back to Top
Margi Cintrano View Drop Down
Master Chef
Master Chef
Avatar

Joined: 03 February 2012
Location: Spain
Status: Offline
Points: 5897
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote Margi Cintrano Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20 March 2013 at 14:40
Dan. Awesome thread. Though I have not delved into Molecular Gastronomy personally; I had eaten in The Adria Brothers El Bulli prior to its closing 31 july 2011 and in numerous other restaurants employing these techniques .. Albert Adria .. Joan Roca .. Carme Ruscadella .. Quique Dacosta y Paco Roncero in Iberia.
 

In Manhattan, Wylie Defresne' WD and Tom Keller's Per Se. In DC Jose Andres Tapas Bar ..

 

Great thread Keep us posted at Fotw.

 

Margaux 
www.guidepost.es
Gourmet´s Choice - Time Out In Spain ...

WEBSITE: www.visionsgourmandes.com
www.issuu.com / Beyond Taste, Oltre il Gusto ..
Back to Top
gonefishin View Drop Down
Master Chef
Master Chef
Avatar

Joined: 20 September 2012
Status: Offline
Points: 1773
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gonefishin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20 March 2013 at 17:05
    It's kind of neat, Margi.  It's like what a nice brunoise can add to the texture of a dish, or when you play with temperature differences on a plate.  It can just add that something extra to the flavors and textures of a dish.


    You really have eaten at some of the nicest restaurants in the world from many of the most respected chefs of the world.  It's really quite impressive.  I had hoped to someday eat at el Bulli, though his brothers place will certainly do...someday Smile

  Have a great day!

Dan
Enjoy The Food!
Back to Top
gonefishin View Drop Down
Master Chef
Master Chef
Avatar

Joined: 20 September 2012
Status: Offline
Points: 1773
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gonefishin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 March 2013 at 13:02
   Making Cold Oil Spherification "Caviar" can provide that nice texture and pop of flavor.  With this method the entire "ball" is gel (no liquid center, that's a different technique).  You can pick all kinds of different ingredients to treat like this with good results.

   You can use things like Balsamic Vinegar, Hot sauce, etc...or you can use fresh fruit, fresh herbs...etc...etc.  While sometimes you may be going after texture alone, most times big bold flavors are your friend!  But, your imagination is the only limiting factor here!

   All you need for this is some cold oil (canola does fine), a Bbq Syringe, Some Agar and a Small Slotted Spoon.
Enjoy The Food!
Back to Top
gonefishin View Drop Down
Master Chef
Master Chef
Avatar

Joined: 20 September 2012
Status: Offline
Points: 1773
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gonefishin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 March 2013 at 13:03

AGAR-AGAR by molecule-r.com

Function

An algae extracted, heat-resistant gelling agent, agar-agar is used in molecular gastronomy to make all sorts of gelified shapes : pearls, spaghetti, lentils, prisms, etc.

 

Origin

Agar-agar is a natural gelling substance stemming from the cell walls of red algae, of the gelidiacees family, like gelidium and gracialaria. It has long been used in several Asian culinary traditions. Moreover, the name agar-agar is of Malay-Indonesian origin and means jelly. A Japanese legend tells that the original manufacturing process of the agar-agar was discovered in the mid-seventeenth century. One winter evening, a Japanese officer would have been offered a traditional dish of jelly concocted from gelidium seaweed boiled in water, by the owner of a small inn. After dinner, the innkeeper would have thrown the remnants of jelly outside. Within a few days and after several cycles of freezing, thawing and drying in the sun, a white substance seems to have appeared which the landlord would have collected and boiled. He would have obtained a gelatin whiter than the original and whose texture in the mouth would have pleased the Japanese ever since. The same process of freezing and thawing is still used today, on a large scale, to extract and purify the agar-agar of the seaweed from which it originates.

 

Properties

Agar-agar is used for its gelling capabilities and the unique properties of the gels obtained by it. Gelling occurs when a solution of agar-agar has cooled in a liquid that was previously brought to a boil. Depending on the species of algae used, gel formation will take place at temperatures between 32°C and 43°C. (90°F and 110°F).

The agar-agar gel will retain its firmness even when subjected to temperatures grazing 85°C (185°F), unlike gel-based gelatin, which melts at 37°C (99°F). This wide gap between the temperature at which a gel is formed and the temperature at which it melts is unique.

Agar-agar does not impart flavor or smell to mixtures; it actually promotes the release of other aromas in the mouth. It is usually used in very low dosage, since gelling is evident at levels of concentration of agar-agar below 1%. The firmness of the gel is directly proportional to the concentration of agar-agar used in a dish. The weaker the dosage of agar-agar, the more supple and fragile the gel will be; the stronger the dosage, the more firm and brittle the gel will be.

 

Industry applications

The remarkable heat resistance of agar-agar gels make them excellent stabilizers and thickeners in pie fillings, icings and meringues. This same property is a tremendous asset to the transportation of goods, by allowing greater flexibility in controlling the temperature.

In combination with other vegetable gums, agar-agar may act as a stabilizer in sorbets and ice cream, as well as to improve the texture of dairy products like yogurt and cream cheese. The gelling properties of agar-agar are also used in the preparation of fruit confectionery which are particularly popular in Asia.

About 90% of the production of agar-agar is thus directed towards the food processing industry; the remainder is mainly used in the health field. Agar-agar gel is used as bacterial growth gel in Petri dishes, from microbiology laboratories around the world. In addition, agar-agar is used in dentistry as a material for moulding the teeth. These are just some of the many uses of agar-agar.

 

Creative cooking applications

Agar-agar is one of the flagship additives of molecular gastronomy. It is used to make dishes with unusual shapes and textures such as pearls and spaghetti gels. There is simply to dissolve the powdered agar-agar in a boiling aqueous liquid, then let it set while cooling, using various techniques. It is also incorporated into preparations using a food siphon to produce very light foams.

Agar-agar preparations are heat resistant, thereby making it possible to serve hot foams and gels.

 

Healthy cooking applications

Agar-agar has the advantage of being calorie-free. It is also 80% fibers and can therefore affect regularity of the bowel.

In jams, agar-agar holds better than pectin and because of a very good release of flavor in the mouth, it amplifies the taste of fruit and thus reduces the amount of sugar needed in a recipe. 

Lastly, agar-agar is an ideal vegetable substitute for animal gelatin.

 

Tips and tricks

The gelling properties of agar-agar are activated only if the solution is boiled for about two minutes. There is only then to let it rest in a cool place or at room temperature so that it gels.

Dissolution

A hand blender is recommended to dissolve agar-agar. A whisk can also be used but in order to prevent lumps from forming, the agar-agar powder has to be poured slowly and gradually. Another technique is to first dissolve the agar-agar in a small amount of boiling water, which will then be poured into the final preparation. It is important to remember that agar-agar is not soluble in all liquids, but only in water. For example, agar-agar will not dissolve in oil or pure alcohol. Water will therefore have to be added to the mixture.

Animal Gelatin Substitute

Of vegetable origin, agar-agar is an ideal substitute for animal gelatin. As little as 2 g. of agar-agar powder replaces 3 sheets of gelatin, that is to say 6 g. Unlike gelatin, agar-agar is truly tasteless and odorless, which may be preferable for certain recipes. Furthermore, it holds better when removed from a mold and also keeps better. Finally, the agar-agar foam produced with a food siphon also holds better than animal gelatin foam, this property allows for lighter and airier textures.

Adding fondant

Agar-agar gels have a firmer texture and are more brittle than gelatin, which, unlike agar-agar gels, usually melts at a temperature approaching that of the inside of the mouth. To reproduce the effect of fondant in the mouth that gelatin has, tara gum can be added to the preparation of agar-agar. This will soften the mixture and make it creamier.

Dosage

When one tries out a recipe of his/her own, one must be able to determine the right mix of agar-agar and liquid. As the solution of agar-agar gels only during the cooling period, the mixture can be brought  to a boil, then only a small amount can be cooled at room temperature. The gelling should usually be done within three minutes or less. If the result seems too runny, there needs only to add a small quantity of agar-agar to the preparation; if it seems too stiff, a small quantity of liquid must be added.

Enjoy The Food!
Back to Top
gonefishin View Drop Down
Master Chef
Master Chef
Avatar

Joined: 20 September 2012
Status: Offline
Points: 1773
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gonefishin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 March 2013 at 13:06

Balsamic Vinegar Pearls Recipe by molecularrecipes.com


The balsamic vinegar pearls are a simple and fantastic way to add a touch of molecular gastronomy to your dishes. The balsamic vinegar is transformed into small jelly balls using agar agar and the cold oil spherification method.

The cold oil spherification method consists of cooling droplets of a hot agar solution below 35 ˚C (95 ˚F) by releasing them in cold oil using a syringe or pipette. Agar agar needs to be heated to boil for jelling and sets at a temperature of about 35-45 ˚C (95-113 ˚F). The droplets need to cool down and set before they reach the bottom of the cold oil container to keep a nice spherical shape.

 

 

Balsamic Vinegar PearlsBalsamic Vinegar Pearls Ingredients

100 g (7 oz) Balsamic Vinegar

1.5 g (1.5%) Agar Agar

Oil Bath

1 cup of oil, cold from being in the freezer for at least 30 min

Preparation

Start by placing the oil in a tall glass in the freezer for at least 30 minutes. It is better if you use a tall glass so there is more time for the balsamic vinegar droplets to get cold and gel before reaching 4-Arugula spaghettothe bottom.

Once the oil has been in the freezer for at least 30 minutes, put the balsamic vinegar in a saucepan, dissolve the agar agar and bring it to the boil, stirring constantly with a beater. Take off the heat and skim to eliminate any impurities.

Wait a few minutes until the temperature drops to 50-55 ˚C (~120-130 ˚F). If the liquid is too hot, the droplets may not cool down enough and therefore not gel completely before reaching the bottom of the glass resulting in deformed spheres.

Fill a syringe with the hot balsamic agar solution and expel it drop by drop into the cold oil. The syringe needs to be high enough for the drops to sink when they get in contact with the oil but not too high or the drops may break into smaller drops creating “baby” spheres. Wait a few minutes and then carefully remove them from the oil bath using a slotted spoon and rinse them in water. You can keep them in a container in the fridge for later use.    

Serving Suggestions

- Serve on salads

- Serve on tomato halves

Recipe adapted from www.molecule-r.com

Enjoy The Food!
Back to Top
TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar

Joined: 25 January 2010
Location: Chinook, MT
Status: Offline
Points: 8819
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 March 2013 at 13:07
I'm a "staunch" traditionalist when it comes to most foods, but this kind of thing really intrigues me, and I have an avid interest in reading about it or seeing it in action. 
 
The cold oil speherification is probably the one I am most interested in at the moment; if I were going to suspend my peasant-cooking philosophy and try some molecular gastronomy, I do believe that the "caviar" would be my first project!
 
Keep the information coming ~ it's good stuff for sure! Clap
If you are a visitor and like what you see, please click here and join the discussions in our community!
Back to Top
Margi Cintrano View Drop Down
Master Chef
Master Chef
Avatar

Joined: 03 February 2012
Location: Spain
Status: Offline
Points: 5897
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Margi Cintrano Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 March 2013 at 14:26
Dan Gone Fishin,
 
Awesome thread Dan ... Have enjoyed reading your exemplarily written feature.
 
I was wondering, what are your views on Ferrán Adrià ?
 
I had the amazing experience to interview him and taste the 35 dish taster´s carte at the former El Bulli on Costa Brava in a picturesque fisherman´s village called Las Rosas.
 
This is very in tune / parallel with your well researched article.
 
One of the dishes we shared was Caviar of Persian Melon and it was absolutely heavenly.
 
Many of his disciples also employ Nitrogen Liquid and many of the well researched items, you have mentioned in your threads above ...
 
Truly, wonderful experiences. Chef Joan Roca, chosen by London Restaurant Magazine for the 2nd best restaurant in the world; CELLER CAN ROCA, in GIRONA CAPITAL, CATALONIA; also employs many of these spoken of techniques.
 
HERE IS A FOTO FROM CHEF JOAN ROCA;
 
YOGURT, WHITE FLOWER PETALS, COTTON CANDY DESSERT ...   
 
Margi.
www.guidepost.es
Gourmet´s Choice - Time Out In Spain ...

WEBSITE: www.visionsgourmandes.com
www.issuu.com / Beyond Taste, Oltre il Gusto ..
Back to Top
HistoricFoodie View Drop Down
Master Chef
Master Chef


Joined: 21 February 2012
Location: Kentucky
Status: Offline
Points: 4496
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 March 2013 at 17:15
Dan, I'm a little confused. Not surprising....I took high-school chemistry twice, and barely got through it in college.

With that proviso: In the background notes you say, "...agar-agar is not soluble in all liquids, but only in water..." That being the case, how does it work when mixed with vinegar?

I'm sure I'm missing something.

I'm wondering, too, how this would work with watermelon juice. I can see watermelon caviar as an interesting addition to salads.
Back to Top
gonefishin View Drop Down
Master Chef
Master Chef
Avatar

Joined: 20 September 2012
Status: Offline
Points: 1773
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gonefishin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 March 2013 at 17:36
Originally posted by TasunkaWitko TasunkaWitko wrote:

I'm a "staunch" traditionalist when it comes to most foods, but this kind of thing really intrigues me, and I have an avid interest in reading about it or seeing it in action. 
 
The cold oil speherification is probably the one I am most interested in at the moment; if I were going to suspend my peasant-cooking philosophy and try some molecular gastronomy, I do believe that the "caviar" would be my first project!
 
Keep the information coming ~ it's good stuff for sure! Clap


    Tas, I'm like you.  I really enjoy cooking peasant foods.  My friend is the one who got me going into the molecular gastronomy stuff.  The Caviar is a great place to start.  I think you can bring little bits of molecular side into humble foods...it gives it just a touch of something different.

    Strange stuff, isn't it...

  Dan


Originally posted by Margi Cintrano Margi Cintrano wrote:

Dan Gone Fishin,
 
Awesome thread Dan ... Have enjoyed reading your exemplarily written feature.
 
I was wondering, what are your views on Ferrán Adrià ?
 
I had the amazing experience to interview him and taste the 35 dish taster´s carte at the former El Bulli on Costa Brava in a picturesque fisherman´s village called Las Rosas.
 
This is very in tune / parallel with your well researched article.
 
One of the dishes we shared was Caviar of Persian Melon and it was absolutely heavenly.
 
Many of his disciples also employ Nitrogen Liquid and many of the well researched items, you have mentioned in your threads above ...
 

 Margi.


   Thanks for your enthusiasm, Margi! 

   I have certainly heard of Ferrán Adrià, but never had the opportunity to enjoy his food.  My friend was actually in Barcelona the last week El Bulli was open, for the Mobile World Congress...but he couldn't get in.  He tried to give his name in case anyone canceled, it was worth a try.  He did get to eat at Albert  Adrià's place.  I think this is what actually pushed him over the edge into doing molecular gastronomy himself.  He has also gotten the tasting menu at L2O a few times as well.

    It is certainly a different way of interpreting a dish, conceptually...and then artistically.  Ferrán is certainly at the forefront of this category of cuisine.  Grant Achazt (Alinea and Next in Chicago) featured El Bulli inspired food in his "Next" restaurant for a month...this certainly had to be marvelous.  I plan to save up and go to either Next or Alinea in a year or two, should be an awesome experience.

    My friend has the Nitrogen dispenser, I don't.  He has made a number of things successfully with it.  Soy Lecithin is another nice one.  You use it, and a hand blender to make foams and airs for that nice touch.

   Margi, Brook...I didn't write the articles above.  If you notice I credited each of the correct authors beside the title...and included a link to the authors website. 


Originally posted by HistoricFoodie HistoricFoodie wrote:

Dan, I'm a little confused. Not surprising....I took high-school chemistry twice, and barely got through it in college.

With that proviso: In the background notes you say, "...agar-agar is not soluble in all liquids, but only in water..." That being the case, how does it work when mixed with vinegar?

I'm sure I'm missing something.

I'm wondering, too, how this would work with watermelon juice. I can see watermelon caviar as an interesting addition to salads.



   Hi Brook!  Yeah, that is a bit confusing.  I didn't write those articles, but you can follow the link provided with them to go to the original content website. 

   "It says agar agar is not soluble in all liquids, but only in water..."


   I think what they mean is that agar agar is not soluble in all liquids, but you may add water, to some of those liquids, to help the agar dissolve into the solution.  Something like that anyways.

   Balsamic vinegar certainly does work.  The Watermelon "caviar" is a great idea as well.  One thing you'll want to do when using fruit juice is to reduce it down some...to provide maximum punch in that little "egg".  My buddy has also done fresh herbs as well, like cilantro.  So I imagine cilantro, basil, mint would all work (oh, we have been focusing on the food side of molecular gastronomy...but it's also used in drinks as well).   Hmmm, grapefruit would be another good one.  But, remember, you'll want to concentrate the flavors down first.  One down note, as far as we have tried...olive oil will not work with any of the normal molecular tricks...at least it will not form into a ball.  It does combine with the Malto powder (that we discussed above)...and it makes a very good olive oil powder.  I believe you should be ready for that one in a day or two Wink.

    Most of the recipes are written for one packet of agar agar.  I usually halve the amounts used, but you can make a decision on that.  Once you're ready...I'll make a post with instruction for a caviar. 


Dan
Enjoy The Food!
Back to Top
Hoser View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar

Joined: 06 February 2010
Location: Cumberland, RI
Status: Offline
Points: 3375
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote Hoser Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22 March 2013 at 00:12
Out-freaking-standing thread Dan!

As if I didn't have enough to do already....now you've got me interested in all these little "flavor bomb" ideas LOL. 
It won't be soon, but rest assured I'll be playing with this in the future.Thumbs Up
Go ahead...play with your food!
Back to Top
MarkR View Drop Down
Chef
Chef
Avatar

Joined: 03 February 2011
Location: St. Pete FL
Status: Offline
Points: 627
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote MarkR Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 23 March 2013 at 04:21
So Dan, how do you think these little "flavor bombs" would hold up in sausage? Obviously through grinding, but added before stuffing. Like a Summed Sausage with Balsamic bombs in it? Would they withstand the smoking or cooking, or even dry curing?
Just thinking out of the sand box again!
Mark R
Back to Top
gonefishin View Drop Down
Master Chef
Master Chef
Avatar

Joined: 20 September 2012
Status: Offline
Points: 1773
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gonefishin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 23 March 2013 at 06:39
Originally posted by Hoser Hoser wrote:

Out-freaking-standing thread Dan!

As if I didn't have enough to do already....now you've got me interested in all these little "flavor bomb" ideas LOL. 
It won't be soon, but rest assured I'll be playing with this in the future.Thumbs Up


    Hoser, it is so cool to hear there is interest in Molecular Gastronomy.  I really do think it's something that can be introduced into any type of cooking, it doesn't have to be the spotlight...only a highlight to the main ingredient.  But again, if you want to make it the spotlight...by all means ---> do it!



Originally posted by MarkR MarkR wrote:

So Dan, how do you think these little "flavor bombs" would hold up in sausage? Obviously through grinding, but added before stuffing. Like a Summed Sausage with Balsamic bombs in it? Would they withstand the smoking or cooking, or even dry curing?
Just thinking out of the sand box again!


    Hey Mark!

  Like I had said, I have just got into this myself.  I like the way you're thinking...as I don't believe there are any rules.  Sure, there are methods that will not work in all applications...but I think we're supposed to push those boundaries and find a way to make things work.

 I don't "think" that they would hold up in sausage well.  I'm thinking that they would turn to liquid during the heating process of the sausage...but I do certainly like the idea.  I wonder if you slice the sausage into disks, like for an appetizer.  Then put some balsamic bombs on top...maybe beside a lesser amount of Thyme bombs...or whatever.  While they do last a while, they will break down, so I don't think they would hold up in the sausage that well for smoking or curing.  (but now, I just thought of this.  Don't forget that you can take some of these smoked meat flavors and turn them into a powder (with the Maltodextrine.)  So while you may not be able to put the flavor bombs inside the sausage...you can still find an interesting way to incorporate the flavors)

   They may hold up to a cold smoke really well, I'm not sure.  That's a really fantastic idea!!! 
Enjoy The Food!
Back to Top
africanmeat View Drop Down
Chef
Chef
Avatar

Joined: 20 January 2012
Location: south africa
Status: Offline
Points: 910
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote africanmeat Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 23 March 2013 at 09:41
This is really amazing  last week  I ordered the cuisine revolution kit from MOLE COLE
from Canada,
i play with  Molecular Gastronomy for a while and it is fun.
this was my first attempt  http://www.smokingmeatforums.com/t/117249/hot-chili-caviar
it is really fun now i am a waiting for  my box of magic .Wink
Ahron
Back to Top
 Post Reply Post Reply Page  12>
  Share Topic   

Forum Jump Forum Permissions View Drop Down



This page was generated in 0.094 seconds.