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Fun Food Facts

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Hoser Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27 December 2011 at 04:53
It's been quite a while since I've posted any brain teasers in this thread, so here's one that I came up with that should actually be quite easy.

Can anyone tell me what this tool is used for?

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27 December 2011 at 07:06
it looks extremely familiar, but i'm not quite recalling.....
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Hoser Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 December 2011 at 01:53
OK...I thought I may have telegraphed the answer in my other post today...it's a clam opener. An unusual but very effective one that I have had for years....you will see it in action during my clams casino post this weekend.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 December 2011 at 07:09
looking forward to it!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Hoser Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11 April 2012 at 03:42

From Food Reference.com

RACK OF LAMB

Rack of Lamb (Rib Roast)

'The American Frugal Housewife' by Lydia Maria Child (1836) was“Dedicated to Those Who Are Not Ashamed of Economy.”  
Remember this excerpt next time you see Rack of Lamb for $10 to $15 per pound:

Frenched Rack of Lamb

“That part of mutton called the rack...is cheap food. It is not more that four or five cents a pound; and four pounds will make a dinner for six people...If your family be small, a rack of mutton will make you two dinners....”

 

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11 April 2012 at 05:31
Next time I see a rack of lamb for ten bucks a pound will be the first time in modern history. At that price I'd stock up.
 
We could make a list of luxury foods that were, fairly recently, considered cheap. Among them:
 
Lobster and Atlantic salmon----both of which were so cheap and so abundent that laws had to be passed controlling how often they could be fed to servents.
 
All the bottom cuts. Cookbooks still refer to the "cheap" cuts such as flank steak, bottom round, rump steak. And, of course, since the celebrity chefs discovered things like short ribs, they've become luxury items as well.
 
My prediction: Beef shank is on its way into this category.
 
Ofal. Basically this means all the soft organs. You know, the stuff we ate to extend the food budget. Now even cartiledge has become a luxury item.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Hoser Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 April 2012 at 02:32
Right you are Brook...especially about the lobster...here is an except from "The History of Lobstering"

Long ago, lobsters were so plentiful that Native Americans used them to fertilize their fields and to bait their hooks for fishing. In colonial times, lobsters were considered "poverty food." They were harvested from tidal pools and served to children, to prisoners, and to indentured servants, who exchanged their passage to America for seven years of service to their sponsors. In Massachusetts, some of the servants finally rebelled. They had it put into their contracts that they would not be forced to eat lobster more than three times a week.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Hoser Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 April 2012 at 02:44
Today is national licorice day !

It is also the feast of St Zeno of Verona, the patron saint of fishermen.

Lastly, the Cochumatan indians of Guatemala celebrate their corn festival.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Hoser Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14 April 2012 at 03:16
Today is national pecan day!

Also, on this day in 1927 Clarence Birdseye of Massachusetts received a U.K. patent for "frozen
fish fingers".

If only I'd know ....maybe I could have gotten great grandad to stop him!Dead
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14 April 2012 at 11:34
LOL
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14 April 2012 at 12:02
here is an except from "The History of Lobstering..........."
 
Twas exactly the same with Atlantic salmon----which they used to harvest with pitchforks, the fish were so thick in the streams. Just stand in the water and toss 'em onto the shore.
 
Another poverty food was cod. In fact, low-quality salt cod was part of the triangle trade, and was sent by the boatload, from New England, to feed slaves in the Carribean.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Hoser Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 April 2012 at 03:45
On this day 100 years ago, Cunard Line chef Charles Joughin survived the sinking of the Titanic despite being in the frigid water for over three hours. Some attribute his luck to his blood alcohol level after the ship hit the iceberg. 
Charles Joughin

Here is a link to a good account of the chef's heroism and survival

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 April 2012 at 08:49
i've always been interested in the history of the titanic, the times and the various lives that intertwined. the nexus of factors that came together that night were incredible, and i'm not just talking about the ship and the iceberg.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Hoser Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 April 2012 at 03:35


  • Well, I have to totally disagree with this website....the good old wolf peach is one of my all-time favorite fruits.


    Tomatoes are evil.


    all photos from tomatoes are evil

    There are certain foods that divide the entire population. People seem to either passionately love or fervently hate foods like sardines, ginger, brussels sprouts, and, of course, tomatoes. I love tomatoes, especially when they're picked fresh from a garden, but it seems that the anti-tomato front is organizing its efforts with what appears to be the first tomato defamation website, where tomato haters can gather and seethe to their heart's content.  



    TomatoesAreEvil.com offers tomato hatin' games (in one, you can let out your rage by shooting tomatos Scarface-style), incriminating tomato facts (did you know that the scientific name of tomatoes means "wolf peach" in Latin?), and tomato-free recipes like pasta sauce.

    The site takes no official stance on the perpetual "fruit or vegetable" question surrounding tomatoes, instead saying "Fruit or Veg - it's Evil."  My personal favorite is their list of how to say tomato in other languages:

    English = Tomato
    French = tomate
    Dutch = tomaat
    German = Tomate
    Danish = tomat
    Spanish = tomate
    Italian = pomodoro

    In all languages:
    tomato = evil

    Do you think tomatoes are evil or is this website a culinary crime?
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 April 2012 at 04:30
I can't even agree with the basic contention. Unlike, say, Brussels sprouts or calves liver, the population is not vehemently divided over tomatoes. Sure, there are those who love them and those who hate them. But these are far outweighed by those who can take 'em or leave 'em, or who just don't care.
 
In short, love/hate is not a culinary issue of any degree.
 
BTW, the fruit/vegetable issue has long been settled. Botanically, tomatoes are a fruit. No question about it. In the United States, however, they are legally vegetables, by an act of congress.
 
did you know that the scientific name of tomatoes means "wolf peach" in Latin?),
 
Which of the three commonly used botanical names translates that way? And why is "wolf peach" evil?
 
Seems to me these guys are on their collective butts, with far too much time on their hands.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Hoser Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 April 2012 at 05:32

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Margi Cintrano Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 April 2012 at 07:58
A very entertaining and informative post !
 
Interesting tidbits of gastronomic interest ...
 
Kindest.
Margi.
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Gourmet´s Choice - Time Out In Spain ...

WEBSITE: www.visionsgourmandes.com
www.issuu.com / Beyond Taste, Oltre il Gusto ..
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Hoser Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 April 2013 at 05:11
Lighthouse???....errrrr...ok, if you say so I guess.Embarrassed

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 April 2013 at 08:15
Shocked

 
Embarrassed
 
 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Hoser Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 November 2013 at 03:57
  • Before Columbus, Europe had never tasted corn, potatoes, tomatoes, red peppers, sweet potatoes, tapioca, chocolate, pumpkins, squash, coconuts, pineapples, strawberries, and much more.  Why?  All these food items are native to America.
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