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Gazpacho, my easy way

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ChrisFlanders View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote ChrisFlanders Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: Gazpacho, my easy way
    Posted: 02 August 2012 at 12:11

Many times I'm reading recipes for gazpacho using almost industrial quantities of ingredients and I'm always curious what on earth do they do with the rest?

Let's make it plain simple and easy. This is my recipe for around 1 liter of gazpacho that will make around 6 servings.

Gazpacho is very easy to make -let's say deceptively easy- like most so called "easy" dishes. It's however all about balance. You need very ripe tomatoes (now is the time!!) but NO cherry tomatoes! And gazpacho has to be slightly acidic from the added vinegar, very refreshing.

Let's get on with it;

I used 3 ripe tomatoes, half a cucumber peeled but seeds still in, 1 yellow bell pepper (peel it first, many people do not digest the peel!!!), 1/2 an onion, 1 large clove of garlic, 1/2 white soft breadroll (it's on the left in the picture, use 1 or 2 slices of white bread instead), 3/4 cup of cold water, 1/2 cup of olive oil, 2-3 tbsp of white wine vinegar (use Xerez vinegar if you have it), plenty s&p.

Cut all the ingredients in small chunks and add to a mixing bowl. Add the cold water, plunge in your handmixer and blitz finely. Now add the bread and blitz again. Add s&p, olive oil and vinegar and blitz once more. Taste, taste and taste; for seasoning and for acidity! Put it all in the fridge and let cool for at least an hour. You're basically done! How easy is that? It's a good idea to add water and vinegar a bit at a time and see how it works out in consistency and taste. It has to be a little acidic but the acidity may not overpower the taste of the other ingredients! Can you use lemon juice instead of vinegar? No. Can you use balsamic vinegar instead? Ab-so-lu-te-ly not! I used my homemade vinegar flavored with rose petals! The recipe of that vinegar can be found on this forum somewhere.

So this step is totally redundant and even not Spanish in any way. We're making parmesan tuiles or tiles in english. Maybe it can be made with spanish queso Manchego, probably. This is dead simple. Grate some parmesan, spread a tbsp worth in a serving ring placed in your non-stick pan. Put on medium high heat untill it melts but do wait until it bubbles. Done. Remove from the pan and let cool. You may have to cut it loose from the ring.

Ready to serve. I use these small glasses, they are a reasonable portion. I added the sweetest halved cherry tomato on top and basil cress from the tips of my basil plant. Add the tuile.

.

This recipe fits in my little series "easy no-nonsense recipes".

You may also like these;

http://foodsoftheworld.activeboards.net/paella-my-easy-way_topic2291.html

http://foodsoftheworld.activeboards.net/tajine-sans-tajine-the-easy-diy-approach_topic2171.html

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TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 August 2012 at 15:30
This looks really good and easy, chris, with wonderful pictures!

Our tomatoes were planted a little late this year, (Shocked) but when the bigger ones do start to produce, Gazpacho is a definite goal. We've got a few cherry tomatoes and yellow pears already, and the cherry tomatoes have been incredible. yellow pears have had good flavour but have been a little soft for my preference....
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 August 2018 at 15:52
Exactly 6 years later - to the day - I haven't tried this!

Why not? I have no idea ~

Our garden tomatoes (and cucumbers) are also in the same position now as they were 6 years ago (growing, but late); therefore, I will see if we can get some from the local farmers' market and give this a try, this weekend. Even if I buy them at the store, at least I will be moving forward with the project!

More to come, hopefully -

Ron
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06 August 2018 at 11:53
Well - over the weekend, I did try making Gazpacho for the first time...and succeeded!

I followed Chris's method in the opening post almost exactly, using Roma tomatoes as my base, including the measurements for the vinegar and olive oil; maybe just a little less water than called for. My only variation was due to the fact that there was absolutely no white wine vinegar to be found in two towns; because of this, I used red wine vinegar instead, with no negative consequences.

This turned out very well! The taste was fresh, with all of the ingredients making themselves known, and none over-powering any other; together, they made a new taste of their own and provided wonderful refreshment on a hot day. The salt and pepper were very well-balanced and the acidity seemed - to me - to be right on target. The consistency seemed just right to me too; I used about 1.5 dinner rolls for the bread, and after chilling in the refrigerator I got a nice gazpacho that seemed neither too thick nor too thin but just right.

Success all-around, in my opinion; I was very impressed with my results and will indeed make this again!

Ron
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Margi Cintrano View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Margi Cintrano Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11 August 2018 at 11:13
Gazpacho Andaluz ..

The wife of Emperor Napolean III,  Eugenia de Montijo, of  Granada, was responsibile for  Andalusian Gazpacho´s popularity.  

In 1747, Gazpacho was documented by Juan de la Mata, in the book called ARTE DE REPOSTERIA .. 

Here is the récipe and the most well known récipe in Andalusia  ..

THIS SERVES 6 TO 8 ..

100 grams of day old bread ( Spanish bread, and / or use Italian bread but never  packaged genetically modified bread) 
1 Kilo of red ripe tomatoes ( peeled )  
1 Green & 1 red bell pepper ( 100 grams ), never yellow because it changes the color of the gazpacho and did NOT exist in Spain and still is a rarity .. 
2 cloves of garlic minced 
1 / 4 cup White Sherry Vinegar ( 60 ml. ) 
2 / 3 cup or 155 ml.  Spanish extra virigin olive oil ( bio preferably to industrial ) 

1) Crush the bread in a large mortar with a pestle ..
2) Then place the rest of the ingredients in a large bowl and with a stand up mixer or blender, combine in 2 batches ..
3)  Taste test for texture, it should not be tomato juice thin ..  
4)   When pouring in the  Evoo, do it very slowly, blend and then pour, then blend ..
5)  Salt to taste if you wish ..  ( 2 tsps ..  according to récipe documented )
6)  Pour into a pitcher and cover, and place in refrig  2 hours ..  

This can be served either in a large stemware as a beverage or in a bowl as a cold soup with garnish of  tomato, cucumber, onion, bell pepper red and green and diced stale bread or hard boiled egg ..





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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11 August 2018 at 17:43
Margi,

To state, categorically, that a particular version is the only true recipe is naïve to say the least. At best, the source you quote might be the earliest documentation. But one thing we’ve learned is that documentation always lags behind what’s actually been happening. Of a certainty, nobody waited 200 years before using tomatoes to make this soup.

The roots of gazpacho (nobody, btw, is quite sure where the word, itself, comes from. The most authoritative sources believe it is Moorish Arabic, from an original Greek word) lie in antiquity.

Most food historians believe the start was a soup brought to Iberia by the Romans. It consisted of stale bread, olive oil, and garlic, with some liquid like vinegar, pounded in a mortar. As it evolved, different vegetables and almonds were added to the mix.

Until the early 1500s, almonds were, indeed, the base of the soup. Then tomatoes were introduced from the New World. They took Spain by storm, and nobody would doubt for a minute that tomatoes were added almost immediately, and, eventually, dominated.

What all versions have in common is that the ingredients are pounded in a mortar, and enough liquid---sometimes water, sometimes vinegar, more often both---to achieve the desired consistency. The soup is almost universally served cold.

I find it interesting that many people refer to it as a liquid salad, rather than a soup.

I used to, in the name of authenticity, make mine in a mortar. But as I get older, and Arthur Itis seems to be a permanent visitor, I’m happy to let a blender do the pounding for me.
But we hae meat and we can eat
And sae the Lord be thanket
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Margi Cintrano Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 August 2018 at 04:32

The Word Gazophylacium denotes,  a treasure chest in an ancient monastery, and represents the diversity of  contents ..  It is a Latin Word. 

There are thousands of versions ( 45,000,000 people in Spain & its Islands ) of Gazpacho and then there are the Gaspachos, from Provençe as well which are quite different in texture and ingredients .. 

So, whatever one prefers as we say ..   Each to his own way ..  

Of course, then there is how one serves it, either as a beverage in a large stemware glass or in the traditional manner in a bowl and served with a large soup spoon or drizzled on long toasts of baguette style bread  !!  


There is a White Gazpacho as well called:   Ajo Blanco con Uvas de Muscatel, which is:  Almonds,  day old bread from a loaf, garlic, salt,  Evoo, sherry vinegar, ice cold wáter and muscatel White grapes for garnish ..  

This White gazpacho is most popular in Málaga, than the red tomato versión ..  


Then, one that most tourists or outsiders, have no idea of is:  Capon de Galeria, which is day old bread,  garlic, anchovies, and sherry vinegar ..  

Also there is  Porra Antequerana,  a thick gazpacho with day old bread,  Evoo, red tomatoes, garlic, Sherry vinegar, lemon and garnished with hard boiled egg and ham ..  


 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 August 2018 at 09:00
Margi,

I’m glad to see you amended your post to reflect reality. As your own list shows, there are numerous variations on gazpacho—regional, cook-to-cook, method of serving (there is one Spanish area, in fact, where they prefer serving it hot) etc. And every single one of them is the “only” true recipe.

Origin of the word “gazpacho” is controversial, with linguists and food historians battling it out. Almost all of them agree that each possibility translates, more or less, as “pounded.”

However, the Royal Academy For The Protection of the Spanish Language (not the best translation, perhaps, but you get the idea) says that, while they aren’t quite sure themselves, based on the available evidence,the word is Moorish/Arabic out of the Greek.

And who am I to argue with that august body?

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And sae the Lord be thanket
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Margi Cintrano Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 August 2018 at 09:44
Enjoy your Gazpacho with  whatever   ingredients you like ..

On a personal note, I prefer Salmorejo ( which unlike Gazpacho or Gaspacho is not red .. It is a deep orange color ) ..   

I find its texture (velvety ) and its equilibrium of acid balance  to be much more pleasant and refreshing and far better tasting ..   

However,  we all have our personal tastes, likes, dislikes etcetra ..

All my best for a nice summer ..  

    
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 August 2018 at 18:19
On a personal note, I prefer Salmorejo

Margi,

Ya gonna just drop that on us? How about a recipe?
But we hae meat and we can eat
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Margi Cintrano Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13 August 2018 at 03:03
Brook, 

I thought I may have posted The Salmorejo from Cordoba, however, I shall check the Iberian section and if not I shall post the récipe in a new thread .. I have photograghs too .. 

Have a nice day !!   
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Margi Cintrano Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13 August 2018 at 03:07


Brook,  (11am Monday, the 13th August ) ..  

I just did a search and the Salmorejo Recipe is listed under the title:

Cordoba Salmorejo ..


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