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GEORGIA ON MY MIND…..

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gracoman View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gracoman Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 31 March 2019 at 09:10
How cool is that!  I am very much looking forward to the Sulguni and your take of both cheeses.
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TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 April 2019 at 09:54
Lots of great-looking and sounding stuff, guys - keep up the great work!

Brook - The Crispy Fish with Walnut Sauce sounds great; I was wondering if you found any similarities between it and the Turkish dish with hazelnut sauce that you shared a few years ago, or if this is something entirely on its own?

When you get the chance, could you post the recipe (or your adaptation of it)?
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 April 2019 at 13:16
Completely different, Ron.  This one uses a double-breaded filet, with the sauce drizzled over it.

Interestingly, there is no flour dip. Just a two-bowl set-up; eggs and panko breadcrumbs. You dip egg, crumbs, egg, and crumbs again.  I was concerned about the breading sticking, but it worked just fine.

As so often happens with chef-written cookbooks, the directions are needlessly complex. The recipe calls for using a food processor, a mortar & pestle, and a blender.  Lot's of luck. Even my mini-food processor couldn't handle the small amount of walnuts. The second time I made it I skipped all that, and blended everything but the mayo in my larger mortar. then used a whisk to blend in the mayo.  Here's the sauce recipe. It's said to make enough for 2+ pounds of fish:

1/4 cup chopped walnuts
3 garlic cloves
1 tsp ground coriander
1 tsp ground blue fenugreek (I used a 1/2 tsp regular fenugreek)
1 tsp grounf marigold
1/4 tsp ground red chili
7 oz mayonnaise

Place walnutes in a food processor and process to a very fine paste, which should be sticky and smooth, not grainy. This could take up to five minutes. (Ha! Even by hand with a pestle it didn't take but a minute)

Crush the garlic with the back of a knife and then put in a mortar with a pinch of salt. Grind with a pestle to a smooth paste and set aside.

Place the walnut and garlic pastes in a bowl with the ground coriander, fenugreek, marigold, and chili powder. Add 3 1/2 fluid ounces (a half cup, actually) water and, using your hands (a whisk works fine) bring the mixture together to form a smooth sauce. Transfer the sauce to a blender along with the mayonnaise (ha! Again!) along with the mayonnaise and blend until smooth. Season to taste and set aside. 

Since making the fish, we've used the sauce as a dip for shrimp, and with ham & cheese roll ups. It's all good. 

As I said, this over use of tools is a hallmark of chef-written cookbooks. Using the mortar & pestle, and blending everything with a whisk, didn't take me five minutes altogether.  And I didn't have all those power tools to wash. 

We made the original with haddock. But any firm white fish would work---cod, halibut, you name it. I'm thinking even mahi mahi.  Or even, other that the cost, sea bass.







But we hae meat and we can eat
And sae the Lord be thanket
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TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 April 2019 at 15:57
That does sound good, Brook -

I'm going to have to get my hands on some powdered marigold so I can explore a little more. The chicken dish we made last year was outstanding, and everything we've seen or read bout has given a very favourable impression.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gracoman Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 July 2019 at 13:45
Neknebi 
Georgian Pork Ribs
Adapted for the smoker from the book SUPRA A feast of Georgian Cooking

These pork loin ribs were marinated overnight in a mix of red Ajika (a complex red chili paste), grapeseed oil and apple cider vinegar. Georgians typically use grape vine for smoke wood but I was fresh out Wink  and used apple wood. The ribs were mopped every hour with the marinade, not for moisture (unnecessary in a ceramic smoker/grill) but for flavor enhancement.

These sliced pork ribs are served with a rich, thick, heavily spiced tomato based sauce made from sauteed onion and garlic, tomato paste, water, caster sugar, ground cinnamon, ground cloves, ground nutmeg, hot chili powder, ground black pepper, red ajika and a mixture of egg yolks and apple cider vinegar.  Garnished with fresh cilantro.






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