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HistoricFoodie View Drop Down
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    Posted: 17 March 2013 at 07:29

In case you haven’t heard, the price of balsamic vinegar is about to skyrocket.

Well, it is and it isn’t.

There actually are two types of balsamic: aceto and tradizionale. Aceto, which is generally much cheaper, is what’s about to go through the roof.

I won’t go into all the details about the differences between the two types. The significant aspect is that aceto is made from cheap, run-of-the-mill grapes, whereas tradizionale is made from top-end, wine-quality grapes.

What’s happened is that there’s been two years of poor harvests of the cheap grapes. As a result, the grapes cost more. On the other hand, production of high-end grapes has not suffered as much.

End result: The cost of Aceto Balsomico de Modema---the type most of us use---is going up as much as 70%.

If that, indeed, comes to pass, and the Aceto Balsomico de Modena Tradizionale remains stable, that might, in a sense, be good news. If the prices of the two become significantly closer together, maybe we can afford to use the good stuff.

One can only hope!

On the other hand, I’m stocking up before the prices get really out of line.

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gonefishin View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gonefishin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 March 2013 at 10:46
   Interesting discussion Brook.  I am by no means up to date on the current affairs of the Balsamic industry, so thanks for bringing this to my attention.  I have been meaning to pick up some more balsamic and may push my purchase up because of this post.

    There are certainly some things that I keep in mind when I buy balsamic.  I've had the pleasure of tasting some of the higher quality balsamics, and while they are simply extraordinary...it does not fit all applications.  In fact, a lower quality balsamic may actually be more versatile for every day use in the kitchen. 

   But, that being said...don't discount some of the producers that put out the premium balsamics.  Often times they'll offer a lower quality "everyday" balsamic of good quality.  Like buying good olive oils, quality comes from good producers.  Seek that and then settle on a price that works for you. 

   Again, thanks for the discussion...I think I'll go out and buy myself a bottle of quality and everyday.

  dan
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 March 2013 at 10:11
With this news in mind, I've bought a few bottles of balsamic and white balsamic; not the fancy stuff - the Beautiful Mrs. Tas would roast me alive, but a brand that I like and have good faith in, which is recently available in this area:
 
 
 
The along with the "regular" and white varieties, the pear-infused is also vailable here, but I don't know what I'd do with it, so I haven't gotten it - perhaps it would be good in carbonade Flamande, in place of the usual touch of white balsamic that I use?
 
In any case, I'll probably get about 4, or perhaps 5, bottles each of regular and white, which will most likely carry me through the "crisis" period - I don't use it often.
 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Margi Cintrano Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 March 2013 at 10:18
Tas,
 
Pear infused with pair perfectly with: roast or BBQ duckling, chicken, goose, feathered game or Pork ...
 
 
This is a wonderful English website for those interested in: Aged Balsamic Vinegar from Modena, its history, wood refining processes, the bleak time in the history of Balsamic Vinegar, traditional processing, the grapes employed, production, and the types of Balsamic made in Modena ... and their special qualities. 
 
 
  
 
DESIGNATION: MODENA, EMILIA ROMAGNA, ITALY .  
 
 
*** Just snapped 2 photos, of the 2 bottles I have from Modena ... One is a high quality in photo number 1, and in photo 2, a hot fudge chocolate texture, slightly creamy like hot fudge sundae syrup ... It is used in reductions.


PHOTO 1: MODENA, EMILIA ROMAGNA BALSAMIC VINEGAR - ITALY´s ARGENTINIAN HOTEL VARIETY 



   PHOTO 2: BALSAMIC VINEGAR FOR REDUCTIONS - DESIGNATION ORIGIN: MODENA, EMILIA      ROMAGNA 
 

 
Felices Pascuas.
Margaux.
 
www.guidepost.es
Gourmet´s Choice - Time Out In Spain ...

WEBSITE: www.visionsgourmandes.com
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