Foods of the World Forum Homepage
Forum Home Forum Home > Europe > Hungary
  New Posts New Posts RSS Feed - goulash (gulyas)
  FAQ FAQ  Forum Search   Events   Register Register  Login Login

This site is completely supported by donations; there are no corporate sponsors. We would be honoured if you would consider a small donation, to be used exclusively for forum expenses.



Thank you, from the Foods of the World Forums!

goulash (gulyas)

 Post Reply Post Reply
Author
Message
TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar

Joined: 25 January 2010
Location: Chinook, MT
Status: Offline
Points: 9296
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: goulash (gulyas)
    Posted: 28 January 2010 at 17:20
i came up with this recipe after consulting several sources.
 
one night not long ago, mrs. tas wanted to have goulash for supper. like anyone who has ever had school lunch, i had eaten goulash before, but have never made it. i looked at the recipes in my hungarian volume of time-life's series, "foods of the world," but she wasn't impressed with either of them and said they didn't look like any goulash SHE'S ever had.
 
i looked in a betty crocker/better homes & gardens/family circle-type cookbook and found one there that was a lot closer to what she was used to, so i set out to do that - but then when i got to the store to get a couple of things, i ran into a friend and mentioned what i was making. he said i had to try HIS version of it, which was similar to the one in the cookbook but used tomato soup instead of a tomato sauce/sugar/flour/worcestershire sauce-type sauce. his also had celery, but mrs. tas had never heard of it with celery; also, she had never heard of it with soup, but insisted that it should be prepared with a can of tomatoes instead. she also said sometimes it's had goulash with diced carrots in it.
 
i was beginning to think that goulash pretty much can have almost anything in it, so i took my friend's idea and i tossed a few tweaks of my own based on the recipe book and what mrs. tas said she liked in hers and also on the fact that goulash NEEDS paprika, and here's what i ended  up with. it's not meant to be absolutely, authentically hungarian, but at the same time, i think a hungarian would recognize it:
 
2 lbs ground beef, pork or vension (could also use stew meat or venison in cubes)
2 small onions or one large onion, chopped
1 "bunch" of celery, diced very fine, including those wonderful leaves in the heart
1/2 lb carrots, diced
4 cloves garlic, crushed and minced
salt/pepper to taste (i use lawry's)
3-4 Tbsp paprika, divided
1 large can of tomato soup
1 quart crushed tomatoes
3 beef bullion cubes (do not add water, which will come from aromatics and tomatoes)
a couple of splashes of worcestershire sauce (to taste)
1-to-1.5 lbs. macaroni noodles, prepared separately
 
brown burger with onions (my burger was extremely lean, so there was nothing to drain, but drain fat if necessary after burger is brown and "juice" in burger has cooked off).
 
add celery, carrots and garlic, stirring often to sauté and mix with burger/onion. add 1 Tbsp paprika, salt and pepper. sauté for 10 minutes or so, then add tomato soup, crushed tomatoes, bullion cubes, worcestershire sauce and the remaining paprika to taste. bring mixture to boiling, stirring often, then reduce heat; mixture will be soupy but will start to thicken.
 
simmer for at least 20 minutes, stirring every 5 minutes or so, until the carrots are soft. remove from heat when it has reduced to something similar to spaghetti sauce, then combine with hot, prepared-and-drained macaroni and stir until well-mixed and any remaining juices have been absorbed by the macaroni.
 
serve with buttered buns or bread. i prefer to skip the noodles and serve it on mashed potatoes, but that's just me ~
 
naturally, this is going to make plenty for eating and also for lunches the next week. good, filling and flavorful.
Back to Top
Sponsored Links


Back to Top
Guests View Drop Down
Guest Group
Guest Group
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 January 2010 at 17:36
Oh wow what an exciting turn on goulash, sounds fantastic. You definitely have pegged the basics of it and did a fine job on the end results- sounded delicious! Like you, would have picked mashed potatoes, but who's looking, right? It's all good and thanks for a fantastic recipe!
Clap
Back to Top
Hoser View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar

Joined: 06 February 2010
Location: Cumberland, RI
Status: Offline
Points: 3444
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Hoser Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14 February 2010 at 05:23
Sounds great...you've just given me a couple of ideas to play around with Thinking 





Go ahead...play with your food!
Back to Top
Boilermaker View Drop Down
Chef
Chef
Avatar

Joined: 23 July 2010
Location: Marietta, GA
Status: Offline
Points: 680
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Boilermaker Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 23 July 2010 at 17:05
I actually really like the recipe for gulyas in the Time-Life Vienna's Empire book.  The first time I looked at it I had the same reaction as Mrs. Tas, it didn't seem anything like any goulash I had ever had but I took a chance and made it and it is one of my favorites although my Mrs. Andy doesn't care for it so maybe I'm just odd.  It's not too dissimilar from yours except that it calls for cubes of beef and the addition of potatoes.

Andy 
Back to Top
TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar

Joined: 25 January 2010
Location: Chinook, MT
Status: Offline
Points: 9296
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 23 July 2010 at 22:13
i thought the one in the vienna's empire book looked pretty good and will try it this winter sometime - i'll simply tell mrs/ tas that it's a beef hotdish or something, not gulyas. Embarrassed
If you are a visitor and like what you see, please click here and join the discussions in our community!
Back to Top
Exploreralpha View Drop Down
Cook's Assistant
Cook's Assistant
Avatar

Joined: 12 April 2010
Location: Montana
Status: Offline
Points: 48
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Exploreralpha Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 31 August 2010 at 00:15
Note - the photos that originally went with this post are gone...THANKS, PHOTOBUCKET (not)....

Alright, I'm finally sitting down and posting a recipe or 2, I'm going to start with my family goulash.

A little personal history about it. I grew up eating this meal, it was a cheap, and very tasty meal that my son decided to make to take to school to share a family recipe with his friends, HE (he did it, not me) made a double batch, and it was GONE!

So, let's get started....

The recipe is simple, ground beef (or turkey), elbow noodles, tomato soup, celery and onion.

First you dice up the onion, and slice the celery thin...

Throw the ground beef in the skillet with the onions and celery...

You cook it all together.....

While you are doing all this, make sure to have the pot of water for the noodles boiling, but once the meat and veggie mix is cooked up, add in the tomato soup...

Then mix it all up......

Then you cook and drain the elbow noodles...

Dump the mix into the noodles....

And mix it together...

And plate. An easy meal, cheap, and very tasty, this is the most basic of my family goulash (and we aren't even Hungarian)....

Aaron


Back to Top
Hoser View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar

Joined: 06 February 2010
Location: Cumberland, RI
Status: Offline
Points: 3444
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Hoser Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 31 August 2010 at 03:28
It's funny...growing up in Michigan, I ate a similar dish and of course it was called Goulash. Out here in New England, anything resembling Goulash is tagged with the monicker "American Chop Suey"

They both taste great, but I guess I'll always prefer to call it Goulash.
Go ahead...play with your food!
Back to Top
Guests View Drop Down
Guest Group
Guest Group
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 31 August 2010 at 04:48
Another good old American standby! Well done!
Back to Top
Margi Cintrano View Drop Down
Master Chef
Master Chef
Avatar

Joined: 03 February 2012
Location: Spain
Status: Offline
Points: 6239
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Margi Cintrano Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 24 October 2017 at 16:01

Tas  &   Brooke,   

I  am looking for a traditional classic  Hungarian Goulash recipe.

I have some  Hungarian Paprika from the Central Farmer´s Market ..

I  would use a beef stew meat  and serve a side of potatoes or " pappardelle " noodles as it is closest I come to what is called " noodles " here in Spain  ..  

How did this turn out  ?

Is there an authentic classic from Budapest ?  Historically speaking  ?  

I think this would pair perfectly with Brook´s  cucumber salad as a starter ..  

Thanks Gentlemen ..  Have a lovely evening ..  12am here .. 




 
Volamos a Mediterraneo, un paraiso que conquista su gente u su cocina.
Back to Top
TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar

Joined: 25 January 2010
Location: Chinook, MT
Status: Offline
Points: 9296
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 24 October 2017 at 16:13
Hi, Margi -

This turned out to be quite good, but I would by no means call it authentic. It is more of an Americanized version that probably became popular with families that immigrated over, but was altered in order to accommodate available ingredients, new tastes, etc.

Brook might have some better suggestions, but I'll give you these two links, which I believe would be much more authentic; I have shared these recipes with some descendants of Hungarian immigrants, and in both cases, they were described as "very close to Grandma's recipe."

The first is for a "standard" Hungarian Goulash:

http://foodsoftheworld.activeboards.net/bogrcs-gulys_topic1789.html

The second is for a Transylvanian variation that is really delicious, but breaks a lot of "Gulyas rules" -

http://foodsoftheworld.activeboards.net/szkely-gulys_topic3890.html

I believe that, with your wonderful ingredients over there and perhaps a little consultation with your Hungarian friends, either recipe could be adapted to something that should work well for you. Having said that, I would be very interested in Brook's thoughts, as well, as he has done some great research into Hungarian foodways.

If you are a visitor and like what you see, please click here and join the discussions in our community!
Back to Top
HistoricFoodie View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group


Joined: 21 February 2012
Location: Kentucky
Status: Offline
Points: 4796
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 24 October 2017 at 16:20
Not a simple task, Marji.

Every Hungarian housewife has her own take on gulyas. Then there is the soup/stew argument: many Hungarians insist that gulyas is a soup. However, in published recipes, they are called gulyasleves if a soup is intended. Very often, in addition to the actual beef, soups include things like beef heart and liver.

While there are exceptions, by and large gulyas is a beef dish. Here’s a simple version:

4 lbs beef chuck or rump cut in 2” pieces     
2 strips bacon or salt pork (or use a couple of tablespoons of bacon fat)
6 onions chopped
3 tbls paprika
1 ½ tsp salt
2 green peppers, coarsely chopped

Brown half the beef in its own fat in a large skillet; transfer to a kettle or Dutch oven and repeat with the other half. Deglaze the skillet with a cup of water and add to the meat. Cover and cook slowly over low heat.

Chop the bacon and fry in the skillet. Add the onions and brown lightly. Stir in the paprika and salt, and combine with the simmering meat. Stir in the uncooked green peppers and continue cooking slowing for about 2 hours or until meat is tender.

Gulyas is traditionally served with broad noodles.

But we hae meat and we can eat
And sae the Lord be thanket
Back to Top
Margi Cintrano View Drop Down
Master Chef
Master Chef
Avatar

Joined: 03 February 2012
Location: Spain
Status: Offline
Points: 6239
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Margi Cintrano Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 25 October 2017 at 03:18
Brook,

Yes, it has quite a profound history too.  Guylas signifies Herders or Shepherds and the original récipe dates back to the 9th Century.

In the mid 1500s was when many started to add Paprika and potatoes to their Goulash ..

Lydia  Bastianach and your récipe are almost the same ..

She served her´s  on  Spatezal or Pappardelle Ribbon Pasta Noodles ..   

Thanks so much ..  Going to go for it ..  She uses Italian Evoo and beef round chunks sliced in 1 and 1 / 2 inch chunks ..  She also adds oregano and 2 sprigs of Rosemary ..  The récipe is same otherwise .. Same method ..

Have a wonderful day ..   
Volamos a Mediterraneo, un paraiso que conquista su gente u su cocina.
Back to Top
HistoricFoodie View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group


Joined: 21 February 2012
Location: Kentucky
Status: Offline
Points: 4796
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 25 October 2017 at 04:38
I love Lydia, Margi. But have to disagree with her this time. I just can't see those strong herbs. Might make for a tasty, Italianish stew. But it wouldn't be gulyas.

Potatoes are a natural addition, and, at a guess, I'd say more gulyas' have them than not. Mid-1500s for potatoes and paprika make sense, as they both originated in the New World. So the 16th century is when a lot of traditional European recipes were transformed---gazpacho being the classic example---as the numerous "new" ingredients were incorporated.

Personally, I serve gulyas on spatzle. If I wanted noodles, and couldn't find the wide egg noodles (which happens more and more often, of late), pappardelle certainly would make a good substitute.

All of which shows that there's a lot of variation in gulyas.
But we hae meat and we can eat
And sae the Lord be thanket
Back to Top
TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar

Joined: 25 January 2010
Location: Chinook, MT
Status: Offline
Points: 9296
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 25 October 2017 at 08:29
Lydia has provided me with some amazing insight on Italian cooking - and her method for Gnocchi is the best I've ever seen - but for Hungarian cuisine, I would personally avoid the Italian elements of her Gulyas.

I would say that pork fat (or possibly a 50/50 combination of pork fat and butter) is key to Hungarian cooking, especially with a dish such as Gulyas. If there are reasons for using olive oil, such as dietary or health restrictions, then olive oil would be acceptable; however to get the true experience, I'd recommend rendered pork fat, and rendered bacon fat would be my preference.

As for the herbs, I'd be tempted to use Savory before I used Oregano, as Savory would be more "Balkan," in my opinion. I have nothing on which to base that except instinct. I personally would leave out the Rosemary.

German Spätzle (or the Hungarian equivalent, Nokedli) seems like it would be perfect for this, and I personally would use that before using potatoes or even egg noodles; but as Brook said, any would be acceptable. If you would like to try some great Nokedli, you can see Rod's tutorial here:

http://foodsoftheworld.activeboards.net/rod-franklins-nokedli-pictorial_topic2809.html

Unfortunately, due to PhotoBucket, the pictures are gone; however, the information remains, and is golden, in my opinion.

Good luck!

If you are a visitor and like what you see, please click here and join the discussions in our community!
Back to Top
 Post Reply Post Reply
  Share Topic   

Forum Jump Forum Permissions View Drop Down



This page was generated in 0.094 seconds.