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Growing Fresh Yeast

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Effigy View Drop Down
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    Posted: 26 November 2014 at 22:56
Hi All
I have a question that so far I have not had a good answer to. So I thought of you guys.
I have been given a cake of particularly delicious fresh yeast.
How can I grow more of it? I know how to keep sourdough alive - and yoghurt, and ginger beer, but not fresh yeast.
I have frozen a half ounce of it in the hope I can reactivate it and culture it.

Eff
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Hoser Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27 November 2014 at 01:52
I'm afraid I can't help you with that Anne, but I'm sure Brook will be around sometime soon, and if anyone has that information I think it would be him.
Good luck!
Go ahead...play with your food!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27 November 2014 at 06:16
As I understand it, yeast as we think of it is a product of the 19th century, with refinements to the process appearing well into the 20th.

Previous to that other leavenings were used. While it's possible to breed yeast at home, it's a very complex procedure that yields inconsistent results.

My advice, Ann, is to preserve that strain via a mother
But we hae meat and we can eat
And sae the Lord be thanket
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Effigy Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 November 2014 at 19:49
Thanks Brook.
I have done a fair bit of reading since I posted. I would need to go into a cottage industry to make it worthwhile to produce. An idea which has merit but also needs thorough research, capital, and a really strong marketing plan.
I agree about the mother idea, at least if I am careful I can maintain the flavour.

Since I last talked to you all the flour supply here has improved, with a wonderful range of organic and stone-ground flours now freely available in the local supermarket, everything from white cakeflours to durum wheat for pasta, I am in heaven.
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