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Halloween Cooking

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Melissa Mead View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Melissa Mead Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: Halloween Cooking
    Posted: 30 October 2020 at 16:13
Anybody making anything special? I made Transylvanian Goulash (ghoul-ash?) for an early Halloween dinner. I tweaked the FOTW recipe and made it in my Instant Pot. So basically this:

https://cooking.nytimes.com/recipes/11387-transylvanian-goulash (A lot of their recopies look like the ones in FOTW, I'm noticing.)

...Only I sauteed the onion, then dumped in everything but the sour cream, pressure cooked 10 minutes, natural released, then stirred in some sour cream. (The last time I did the "add flour to sour cream" thing, it tasted like sour paste, so I didn't bother with the flour + heavy cream.)
It's delicious!
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pitrow View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote pitrow Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 November 2020 at 14:32
Nothing special here. Made some Zuppa Toscana in the style of Olive Garden, but that's about it.

Mike
Life in PitRow - My often neglected, somewhat eccentric, occasionally outstanding blog
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Melissa Mead View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Melissa Mead Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 November 2020 at 17:14
That reminds me- I want to make Chicken + Gnocci soup sometime, and I have most of the ingredients except the gnocci.
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HistoricFoodie View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03 November 2020 at 06:28
Why not just make your own, Melissa?  It's basically a potato pasta, with barely enough flour to bind the ingredients.

First time around it will likely be a disaster. Two biggest bug-a-boos: too much flour, and overworking the dough. But it's a very fast learning curve, and you'll quickly develop a feel for it.  
But we hae meat and we can eat
And sae the Lord be thanket
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Melissa Mead View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Melissa Mead Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03 November 2020 at 17:00
It's one of those things I keep thinking I'd like to learn someday, though a friend told me it's tricky.
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HistoricFoodie View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03 November 2020 at 19:22
I'd have to agree with your friend. It is tricky.  Too much flour and you get dense, rubbery bombs.  Too little flour, and they fall apart while cooking.  Done just right, however, you get little pillows of delight.

How much is just right? Depends on the flour and environmental conditions.  Which is why the only way to judge is by experience. And, you gain that experience only by making mistakes. But, as the sainted Miss Julia was fond of saying, "don't be afraid. You can always eat your mistakes."

Pasta making is like bread baking, in that it's a tactile experience. The only way you know that the dough or paste is perfect is by comparing it to others that you've made. Your fingers remember!
But we hae meat and we can eat
And sae the Lord be thanket
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