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halušky s kapustou alebo tvarohom podľa babička

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Margi Cintrano View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Margi Cintrano Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 23 October 2012 at 10:25
 
Tas,
 
Firstly, thanks so much for clarifying the photos and the numerous possibilities on product availability suggestions here in the Mediterranean. The key is, that the Vet and I want to duplicate your traditional family recipe for the 1st time ... We therefore shall be going to El Corte Inglés to see the Eastern European Meat Selections, and see if we can obtain bacon from one of the Balkan Countries. If not, sausage and then, if not: we can get Polish Kielbasa and Hungarian Sausage, surely. I have seen it uncountable times ...
 
We love the Incan variety of Cachuleos, a yellow small potato which is from Galician, in northwest Spain. The cabbage we prefer are the darker green varieties, and thus are Curly in leaves verses the smooth variety and shall work wonderfully.
 
I shall take fotos of the products and then, Saturday, this shall be " our lunch " ... with a bottle oak aged red wine, from Slovenia if possible, or the gateway to this region from Italia, or a Ribera del Duero Tempranillo from Valladolid, Castilla León or Bierzo, León which shall work perfectly. I shall also see the Bakery´s selection at El Corte for a dark seeded bread ... which is typical of this region.
 
For onions, I like Galician yellow sweet, shallots, scallion, and Cebolletas, which are white onions with very long green stems which are utlised too, and called Spring Onion.  
 
Keep you posted and thanks for posting such a lovely feature, for us.
Always.
Margi.
 
 
 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Margi Cintrano Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 23 October 2012 at 11:36
 
Tas,
 
This is a photo of the Curly Green Mediterranean Cabbage variety, I had mentioned.
 
 
Curly Green Cabbage - Photo Courtesy 123Rf.
 
Margi.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 23 October 2012 at 13:07
sounds great, margi, i am willing to bet that this cabbage will work very well!
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Margi Cintrano View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Margi Cintrano Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 23 October 2012 at 14:36
Tas. I believe it shall too. Thanks. Mar.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote Furtwangler Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06 July 2014 at 08:24

The correct name is halušky s kapustou alebo tvarohom podľa starej mamy.

One note on Slovak titles. We don't capitalize every word in a title, only the first one (and of course those that would be written with a capital beginning letter anyway, like names of towns).

All feminine nouns end with -ou suffix in the instrumental case (the preposition 's' always demands this case), that's why ''s kapustou''. I added the preposition podľa (according to, with regard to, following - well, it's difficult to translate) because the title is rather long and would sound unnatural without it. Here the preposition means the same as the Spanish ''a la'' or the Italian ''alla''. It demands the genitive case. If you use the whole expression ''podľa starej mamy'', you can stick it at the end of any recipe title and will surely be correct. It will have the meaning of ''alla nonna''.

The recipe is, however, authentic. Even though we don't make it this way in our family, many people do.

The pasta itself would be called differently today, I guess, it's more like šúľance. You see, the word halušky is one of the two Slovak words that cover the meaning of the English word dumpling (the other being knedlík). Halušky denote those dumplings that are quite small and aren't stuffed. It's a generic word. For instance, any dumpling you put in soup will be ''halušky''. However, most people today, when they say ''halušky'', mean the kind called more precisely ''strapačky''. Those are made from raw grated potatoes and flour (sometimes eggs, too).

Strapačky are especially well suited as a vehicle for bryndza and bacon (bryndzové halušky), the national dish. Or with braised sauerkraut and bacon. Or with tvaroh and bacon. Or with lecsó (Hungarian vegetable stew of onions, garlic, tomatoes and peppers). Or, strangely enough, with plum jam and bacon. Traditionally, plum jam was made by stirring whole plums without any sugar in a copper cauldron over open fire for many hours with an oar. The result was jam that wasn't very sweet and slightly smoky.

"La cuisine, c'est quand les choses ont le goût de ce qu'elles sont."
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 07 July 2014 at 00:08
Thanks for the clarification, Furtwangler. And welcome to our little corner of the culinary world. 

Why not head over to the Members Lounge forum and tell us a little about yourself; particularly your cooking interests. 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 08 July 2014 at 23:15
Hi, Furtwangler - many thanks for the information on the title, whihc I have edited in order to be more precise. I also appreciate the clarification regarding Slovak wording and the different terms in use today. 

These dumplings in many forms are much enjoyed in the region - I hope to try them all! The strapačky with plum jam especially sounds good, and one I would love to make.Tongue
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 08 July 2014 at 23:18
Note: I tried changing the title, but it was too long by a letter or two, so I sought an alternate translation for "grandmother." I hope that it is correct!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote miro Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22 July 2014 at 10:37

there are many recipes for halušky. I agree with Furtwangler when it comes to spelling and cooking halušky. I am old Slovak that grew up in a middle of Slovakia (Zvolen, Detva, etc.) In that region, halušky is made from shredded raw potation and flour and with bryndza with some fried bacon.

There are different recipes say for soup filling (drops) in that case you use what Ron described but cut really small. It's also called "jemne halušky", and there is "šúlance" that you would make with poppy seeds and sugar, etc.

jemne halušky were also used in many Hungarian based meals, like paprikas, chicken on sour crème, etc.

anyway, I mostly post on slovakcooking.com but want to explore some other cooking. I traveled a lot around the world and still did not run across cuisine I did not like

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote miro Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22 July 2014 at 10:51
Oh BTW, don't use a read potatoes for halušky, use old white potatoes. Red potatoes or fresh/new white potatoes are too moist and starchy. That does not go well with halušky. Of course you can try and put it into right ballance, but why when old method works?!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22 July 2014 at 12:08
Thanks for contributing, Miro. A nice tip about potatoes.

Welcome to our little corner of the culinary world. We're certainly happy you found us.

One thing: Why not head up to the Members Lounge forum, and tell us a little about yourself; your cooking interests in particular.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gonefishin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22 July 2014 at 12:24
    Tas...wow, this recipe looks and sounds great!  You can almost smell and taste it through the screen!  Thanks for posting.

Furtwangler and Miro, thanks for the contributions to the recipe and discussion...it's great to get further insight into the traditions of any dish...especially once you start getting into slight regional (or other ) differences.  thanks!



Dan
  


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22 July 2014 at 22:15
Hello, Miro, and I am honoured to see you posting here! I truly enjoy your posts and advice on http://slovakcooking.com and can't thank you enough for what you've taught me so far.

I will indeed have to try halušky with the shredded potatoes - the method I used here is my wife's grandmother's from Žakarovce, but I believe it was probably also "Americanised" a little. 

I also appreciate the advice on the potatoes; I know that there are many different kinds that can serve different purposes, but I have a lot to learn about them! In general, we have red potatoes, Yukon gold potatoes and Idaho "russett" potstoes available. Occasionally there are one or two more, but those are the three main choices here. If I read you right, the Idaho russets might be a better choice?

I am really looking forward to trying this other method as well, and expanding my  halušky experiences.

Many thanks!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote miro Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 24 July 2014 at 17:23

Ron, about potatoes. I know, it may be difficult to find a good one for halusky. In US stores we go for "fresh" which is good for other uses but not so much for halusky. In our area they sometimes sell just "white potatoes" and they may be a bit older. I buy Yukon when I can't find anything else and try to go for a bit aged ones.

See, in the old country we did not have a supply of fresh potatoes year around. You harvested potatoes later in a year, and store them for the winter. Even in stores, they've got a supply of potatoes that were stored in a big "potato storage places" to keep them from spoil but they were aged.

However, don't worry about it. If you have a "fresh potatoes", I prefer Yukon, shred them and wash them in a water (to get starch out of it" and drain it in a colander or piece of close to get some moisture out. Draining is not so important, don't go overboard, as you will need some moisture when mixing it with flour.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 24 July 2014 at 17:55
Understood - thanks for the advice!

Just by co-incidence, I had a bunch of "old" Yukon potatoes just the other day, but I planted them!Shocked
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Furtwangler Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 25 July 2014 at 13:05

It doesn't seem Americanized to me, Ron. We would just call it differently. Incidentally, I went through Žakarovce some two weeks ago on a bike as a part of a longer bike trail (I'm a keen off-road cyclist, you see). The village is one STEEP climb and the boys growing up there, who ride from its one end to another every day, are the future of world cycling, let me tell you.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote miro Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27 July 2014 at 20:46
Oh BTW Ron, I'll take back what I said about potatoes. I also am still learning about "American" potatoes. You mentioned Idaho Russet potato which I ignored so far but I think you were RIGHT! Today I was in a store and paid attention to Russet potatoes, and they looked perfect for making halusky. I'll give it a try tomorrow and let you know how it went.

Cheers
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27 July 2014 at 22:16
Tomas - I've seen photos of Žakarovce and have to agree about the climbing. I can easily imagine that it would be a good training ground for cyclists. Interestingly, the area in Montana where my wife's family settled is similar in the terrain, but of a drier climate. They worked in the coal mines of the area, similar to home, I am sure.

Miro - looking forward to hearing about your results - I'm thinking they will work very well for you! 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote miro Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 08 August 2014 at 08:17
Ron, about potatoes and halusky. Been late making them (as I also made a big pot of kapustnica).
 
You were right (one always learn) Russet potatoes was exactly what's prescribed for halusky. Came out excelent! Oh, one more comment for folks who do not use shreded potatoes.Use smallest size shreder where potatoes come our shreded as a small shred but not as a "paste" If you shreded it too big it does not mix well with flour and halusky most likely fall appart through boiling.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 08 August 2014 at 18:53
Hi, Miro - good to see you again! Beer

It looks like the russets are the way to go - plenty of those here, so it's all good! Thanks for the tip about shredding the potatoes; I intend to try this version of halušky to see how it is, and any advice is valuable. I'll let you know how it goes when I make them. 
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