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    Posted: 27 July 2015 at 17:39
Anyone got a good taco seasoning recipe?

Virtually all the commercial versions contain sugar, and I'm trying to reduce my carbohydrate intake. One version, in fact, has a carb count of 24 grams all by its lonesome.

So, if you have a sugar-free recipe you'd like to share, I'd sure appreciate it.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gonefishin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 July 2015 at 08:40
   Hi Brook!

  Hope all is treating you and yours well.  


   I wish I would write down the taco seasoning I make...it's decent and doesn't use any sugar.  I will say that it's nothing special either.  We're heading for the Michigan Dunes today...so I'll look for it tomorrow.  

   Have a good one
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote drinks Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 July 2015 at 09:31
I suppose you are talking about seasoning the meat going inside the taco.
If so, what is wrong with the old reliable, salt, black pepper, ground chili, onion powder and garlic powder.
A shot of ground comino is always good, too.
And don't forget the cold beer!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
That, of course, is on the side.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote pitrow Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 July 2015 at 10:27
Damn, you had me running scared for a minute there. We use a lot of taco seasoning in this house. At least once a week we have tacos or something made with taco seasoning. I checked the seasoning we use and it's not bad on carbs, 1g sugar, 4gs carbs per serving (2 tsp dry mix).

But, I'm following along. If you come up with a good sugar free / low carb version I'd sure give it a shot.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 July 2015 at 18:10
Mike, is that a commercial mix or something you put together yourself?

4g/serving is too bad a number.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29 July 2015 at 05:30
I found his one on-line, and it sounds about right:

2 1/2 tbls chili powder
1 1/4 tbls paprika
2 tbls cumin
2 tsp oregano, preferably Mexican
2 tbls garlic powder
1 1/2 tbls onion flakes
1/2 tsp cayenne pepper
1 tsp salt

Mix all spices together. Store in airtight container. Will keep for 6 months to a year. Seven teaspoons of this spice mix is the equivalent of one 1.25 gram packet of store bought taco seasoning. Recipe makes the equivalent of 4 spice packets.

If I make this I figure to use Ancho chili powder, and cut back on the cumin just a hair. Two tablespoons sounds like an awful lot.

I'm also torn between adding some cornstarch to the mix, or just waiting and sprinkling it on the cooked meat.

Thoughts and comments?
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gonefishin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29 July 2015 at 08:33
Originally posted by HistoricFoodie HistoricFoodie wrote:

I found his one on-line, and it sounds about right:

2 1/2 tbls chili powder
1 1/4 tbls paprika
2 tbls cumin
2 tsp oregano, preferably Mexican
2 tbls garlic powder
1 1/2 tbls onion flakes
1/2 tsp cayenne pepper
1 tsp salt

Mix all spices together. Store in airtight container. Will keep for 6 months to a year. Seven teaspoons of this spice mix is the equivalent of one 1.25 gram packet of store bought taco seasoning. Recipe makes the equivalent of 4 spice packets.

If I make this I figure to use Ancho chili powder, and cut back on the cumin just a hair. Two tablespoons sounds like an awful lot.

I'm also torn between adding some cornstarch to the mix, or just waiting and sprinkling it on the cooked meat.

Thoughts and comments?

   That's pretty much all mine is.  I do the same, sub'ing ancho chili powder for the cayenne.  I wouldn't add any cornstarch to the mix.  You've got your seasoning and you can choose, separately, to add cornstarch to the meat or not.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Percebes Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29 July 2015 at 12:47
Originally posted by HistoricFoodie HistoricFoodie wrote:

I found his one on-line, and it sounds about right:

2 1/2 tbls chili powder
1 1/4 tbls paprika
2 tbls cumin
2 tsp oregano, preferably Mexican
2 tbls garlic powder
1 1/2 tbls onion flakes
1/2 tsp cayenne pepper
1 tsp salt

Mix all spices together. Store in airtight container. Will keep for 6 months to a year. Seven teaspoons of this spice mix is the equivalent of one 1.25 gram packet of store bought taco seasoning. Recipe makes the equivalent of 4 spice packets.

If I make this I figure to use Ancho chili powder, and cut back on the cumin just a hair. Two tablespoons sounds like an awful lot.

I'm also torn between adding some cornstarch to the mix, or just waiting and sprinkling it on the cooked meat.

Thoughts and comments?


Taco meat in our household generally is made with beef.
In order to amplify the beef flavor, I utilize a high quality powdered demi-glaze mix and it provides the slight thickening and shine that I desire.
In this fashion, no cornstarch is required.
This may exceed your carb requirement.
Although mine is 0g sugar 4g carb per serving 1 1/2 tsp
This is the equivalent of 6g and would be sufficient to thicken 1/4c of liquid.
Extrapolating this out I think that 25g of this demi-glaze mix( or suitable gravy mix substitute) would mix nicely into the recipe you have posted and would only require that you add 1/4 cup of water or stock per batch ( 1 of 4) to finish after cooking the seasoned meat.

The only other addition to your posted recipe if made at our house might be some ground black pepper.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Effigy Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29 July 2015 at 14:00
Originally posted by HistoricFoodie HistoricFoodie wrote:

I found his one on-line, and it sounds about right:

2 1/2 tbls chili powder
1 1/4 tbls paprika
2 tbls cumin
2 tsp oregano, preferably Mexican
2 tbls garlic powder
1 1/2 tbls onion flakes
1/2 tsp cayenne pepper
1 tsp salt

Mix all spices together. Store in airtight container. Will keep for 6 months to a year. Seven teaspoons of this spice mix is the equivalent of one 1.25 gram packet of store bought taco seasoning. Recipe makes the equivalent of 4 spice packets.

If I make this I figure to use Ancho chili powder, and cut back on the cumin just a hair. Two tablespoons sounds like an awful lot.

I'm also torn between adding some cornstarch to the mix, or just waiting and sprinkling it on the cooked meat.

Thoughts and comments?
I'd go along with that, the oregano, paprika and onion should be sweet enough if fresh (freshly dried, I mean) I grind my cumin seeds in a spice mill - so the powder is quite 'fluffy'  -  two Tbsp - would be about right, for my family's taste. If you are using pre-ground stuff which would tend to be more compacted maybe start off with two tsp and work up.
I think the balance between the cumin, oregano and chilli is key. I like to use jalapeno (because that is what I grow).
Also - I like to make the meat and bean filling a day ahead - it gets better in the pot like a good curry. Generally I make up the filling and freeze it in single serve bags, it never occurred to me to make a spice mix - although I do that for Moroccan, so why not Mexican?
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 November 2015 at 12:02
Just to update, after a bunch of experiments I've come up with the recipe that meets our needs:

2 1/2 tbls ancho chili powder
1 tbls sweet paprika
1/2 tbls smoked paprika
2 tbls cumin
2 tsp oregano
1 tbls granulated garlic
1 1/2 tbls onion flakes
1/2 tsp cayenne
1 tsp salt
3 tbls powdered tomato.

Combine all ingredients. Pulse in a spice grinder to powder onion. Store in an airtight container, away from heat and light if possible.

To use, mix 7 teaspoons into one pound of seared, drained taco meat. Add 3/4 cup water. Cook until sauce thickens and meat is coated.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote pitrow Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 November 2015 at 09:18
Awesome, thanks for the recipe! I'm definitely going to try it next time we're out of taco seasoning.


Originally posted by HistoricFoodie HistoricFoodie wrote:

Mike, is that a commercial mix or something you put together yourself?

4g/serving is too bad a number.


Sorry for the late reply, but it's a commercial mix. I'm pretty sure it's the McCormick brand, original taco seasoning. But I'll have to double check it to make sure.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 November 2015 at 11:22
I'm definitely going to try it next time we're out of taco seasoning.

Only possible hitch, Mike: I don't know if tomato powder is available commercially. I make my own by dehydrating tomatoes, then grinding them to a powder.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gonefishin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 November 2015 at 11:39
  I really want to start making powder more!  My thinking is to get a running batch of vegetable powder, using left over vegetables that are getting some age on them...then the same for fruit.  I plan to start a powder shaker for dehydrated mushrooms as well.  Any advice Brook?
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 November 2015 at 18:46
Putting these powders in shaker jars is problematical, Dan.

Problem is they are all hydroscopic, to a greater or lesser degree, and absorb any moisture in the air, even the small amounts in a sealed jar. The result is they don't pour well.

Oddly enough, of those I regularly keep on hand, okra powder is the least susseptible to this problem. Go figure.

Maybe if you put some raw rice in with the powder it would help keep it pourable?

Another issue is that many fruits dehydrate to a leathery consistency, and do not grind readily. F'rinstance, bananas. Unlike the so-called dried bananas you get in the stores---which actually are fried---dehydrated bananas remain chewy.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gonefishin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 November 2015 at 06:57
   Good points, Brook...thanks

     Scoopable would certainly be acceptable if pourable couldn't be obtained.  (Thinking out loud here) What if I freeze, or partially freeze, the dehydrated fruit, such as banana, before grinding. That may help grinding into the initial powder


 Also, I'm thinking a small addition of maltodextrin, or possibly arrowroot, may help the pourability...or at least scoopability.

   I can't remember, do you have any maltodextrin on hand?

  Thoughts?  
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote pitrow Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 November 2015 at 10:20
Originally posted by HistoricFoodie HistoricFoodie wrote:

I'm definitely going to try it next time we're out of taco seasoning.

Only possible hitch, Mike: I don't know if tomato powder is available commercially. I make my own by dehydrating tomatoes, then grinding them to a powder.



yeah I was kind of wondering about that when I read the recipe. I meant to see if I could find any online but got busy and forgot.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 November 2015 at 10:25
Scoopability is no problem, Dan. Of the three powders I regularly keep on hand, both the okra and mushroom remain relatively loose. Not loose enough to pour, but easy enough to scoop. Tomato is the worst of the breed, in terms of absorbing moisture. It doesn't harden up, as some ground spices do. But it tightens enough that you need to stir with the spoon before scooping.

Yeah, I do have maltodextrin on hand; the package you sent me awhile back. But I don't understand your reasoning. Both it and arrowroot are themselves hydroscopic, so that wouldn't solve the problem. Or am I missing something?

I've never tried freezing dehydrated fruits, so have no feel for it. I doubt that their brittleness would be enhanced, as the soft/chewy consistency seems to be a cellular thing, not due to remaining moisture. And, if they do "crisp" up due to frozen water, wouldn't yo wind up with a slurry when you ground them?

Again, lots of room to experiment though.

A lot will depend on your final need, too. F'rinstance, what if you pulsed dried mushrooms so that you got the equivalent of a course mince, rather than a powder. I'd be willing to bet you'd have pourability with that product.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gonefishin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 November 2015 at 08:34
Originally posted by HistoricFoodie HistoricFoodie wrote:

Scoopability is no problem, Dan. Of the three powders I regularly keep on hand, both the okra and mushroom remain relatively loose. Not loose enough to pour, but easy enough to scoop. Tomato is the worst of the breed, in terms of absorbing moisture. It doesn't harden up, as some ground spices do. But it tightens enough that you need to stir with the spoon before scooping.

Yeah, I do have maltodextrin on hand; the package you sent me awhile back. But I don't understand your reasoning. Both it and arrowroot are themselves hydroscopic, so that wouldn't solve the problem. Or am I missing something?


Again, lots of room to experiment though.

 

    Hi Brook...thanks for the comments

    When using Tapioca Maltodextrin it absorbs water and fat incredibly well while retaining a powder form.  In fact, it takes in an incredible amount of moisture or fat.  I'll have to post some simple recipes for you using the maltodextrine powder.  Some things you can make are olive oil powder, salted caramel powder, duck fat and bacon powders...and even peanut butter or nutella powders.  They're all pretty good and quite interesting.  The powder dissolves on your tongue providing an interesting flavor and texture.   

  I'm not saying it will work...but I'm thinking it may.  I'll try it out.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote pitrow Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 23 November 2015 at 09:13
Originally posted by gonefishin gonefishin wrote:

    When using Tapioca Maltodextrin it absorbs water and fat incredibly well while retaining a powder form.  In fact, it takes in an incredible amount of moisture or fat. 


isn't that the stuff they make alcohol powder with too?
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gonefishin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 23 November 2015 at 15:40
Originally posted by pitrow pitrow wrote:

Originally posted by gonefishin gonefishin wrote:

    When using Tapioca Maltodextrin it absorbs water and fat incredibly well while retaining a powder form.  In fact, it takes in an incredible amount of moisture or fat. 


isn't that the stuff they make alcohol powder with too?


  Not sure???
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