Foods of the World Forum Homepage
Forum Home Forum Home > The US and Canada > The Southeast
  New Posts New Posts RSS Feed - hickory 'milk'
  FAQ FAQ  Forum Search   Events   Register Register  Login Login

This site is completely supported by donations; there are no corporate sponsors. We would be honoured if you would consider a small donation, to be used exclusively for forum expenses.



Thank you, from the Foods of the World Forums!

hickory 'milk'

 Post Reply Post Reply
Author
Message
Tom Kurth View Drop Down
Cook
Cook


Joined: 10 May 2015
Location: Alma, MO
Status: Offline
Points: 220
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Tom Kurth Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: hickory 'milk'
    Posted: 06 September 2016 at 19:11
Anybody ever hear of hickory 'milk'? I am reading "1491" by Charles C. Mann (second Vintage edition, p. 302):

     Hickory (nut) was another favorite (of the Indians' diet). Rambling through the Southeast in the 1770's, the naturalist William Bartram observed Creek families storing a hundred bushels of hickory nuts at a time. "They pound them into pieces, and then cast them into boiling water, which, after passing through fine strainers, preserves the most oily part of the liquid" to make a thick milk, "as sweet and rich as fresh cream, an ingredient in most of their cookery, especially hominy and corncakes." Years ago a friend and I were served hickory milk in rural Georgia by an eccentric backwoods artist named St. EOM who claimed Creek descent. Despite the unsanitary presentation, the milk was ambrosial--fragrantly nutty, delightfully heavy on the tongue, unlike anything I had encountered before.

I've never heard of this before. Sounds intriguing.
Best,
Tom

Escape to Missouri
Back to Top
Sponsored Links


Back to Top
HistoricFoodie View Drop Down
Master Chef
Master Chef


Joined: 21 February 2012
Location: Kentucky
Status: Offline
Points: 4519
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06 September 2016 at 20:15
Hey, Tom, good to hear from you.

Nut milks of all kinds were popular among both Native Americans and early settlers. Nowadays only Almond Milk seems to be popular. But that has to do with commercial considerations.

Hickory nuts have a long history of being popular. But for some reason they lost favor with the general populence, to the point where many people, today, think they are inedible.

Interestingly, I've read Bartram's journals of his trips to the Southeast, but don't recall the passage about making hickory milk. But then, again, he covered so much ground it's hard to remember it all.
But we hae meat and we can eat
And sae the Lord be thanket
Back to Top
HistoricFoodie View Drop Down
Master Chef
Master Chef


Joined: 21 February 2012
Location: Kentucky
Status: Offline
Points: 4519
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06 September 2016 at 20:16
BTW, after processing the hickory nuts for milk, the left-over meat of the nuts would be dried and pounded into a meal.

Nothing went to waste, back in the day.
But we hae meat and we can eat
And sae the Lord be thanket
Back to Top
gonefishin View Drop Down
Master Chef
Master Chef
Avatar

Joined: 20 September 2012
Status: Offline
Points: 1773
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gonefishin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 07 September 2016 at 06:46
    We've got a few different nut milks in our stores, cashew, almond and hazelnut.  Having a daughter with a tree nut allergy we just don't bring them in the house.  I'll bring them into work once in a while though.

   On the subject of Hickory products, Hickory syrup is pretty good too.  We've got shagbark hickory trees all over our area.  If anyone has them too...it might be a fun project.  

  Dan
Enjoy The Food!
Back to Top
Tom Kurth View Drop Down
Cook
Cook


Joined: 10 May 2015
Location: Alma, MO
Status: Offline
Points: 220
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Tom Kurth Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 07 September 2016 at 17:44
Hi guys. Questions abound.

Dan, is hickory syrup made from tree sap like maple syrup or is it a nut product?

Is almond milk made like Hickory milk?

I knew meal from acorns was used as a foodstuff.  Wasn't aware of hickory meal. Do I remember right that acorn meal was washed to remove bitterness making the oils, etc. waste?

When do hickory nuts drop? About the same time as pecans, I surmise. I have the impression they are significantly harder to crack than pecans, not so?

Best,
Tom

Escape to Missouri
Back to Top
gonefishin View Drop Down
Master Chef
Master Chef
Avatar

Joined: 20 September 2012
Status: Offline
Points: 1773
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote gonefishin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09 September 2016 at 09:35
    I also thought that Hickory Syrup would be made similar to Maple syrup.  But it turns out that it's a steeped tea made from the hickory bark, then sugar is added to make it into a syrup.

    I have had it before and it's got a good flavor to it.

  Dan
Enjoy The Food!
Back to Top
Boilermaker View Drop Down
Chef
Chef
Avatar

Joined: 23 July 2010
Location: Marietta, GA
Status: Offline
Points: 680
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Boilermaker Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26 January 2018 at 16:11
We have hickory and black walnut trees on our property in Indiana and harvest both hickory nuts and black walnuts.  Both are a real pain to shell but hickory nuts are the worst.  That said, they have a delicious flavor.  We grew up eating hickory pie which is like pecan pie only made with hickory nuts.  Sandies are another favorite, a shortbread like cookie made with black walnuts rolled into a ball and then rolled in powdered sugar after baking.  That method used by the Indians is interesting and makes a lot sense given how difficult it is to separate the nut from the shell.  
Back to Top
 Post Reply Post Reply
  Share Topic   

Forum Jump Forum Permissions View Drop Down



This page was generated in 0.063 seconds.