Foods of the World Forum Homepage
Forum Home Forum Home > Other Food-Related Topics > Around the Kitchen Table
  New Posts New Posts RSS Feed - Honey, I'm Home
  FAQ FAQ  Forum Search   Events   Register Register  Login Login

This site is completely supported by donations; there are no corporate sponsors. We would be honoured if you would consider a small donation, to be used exclusively for forum expenses.



Thank you, from the Foods of the World Forums!

Honey, I'm Home

 Post Reply Post Reply
Author
Message
HistoricFoodie View Drop Down
Master Chef
Master Chef


Joined: 21 February 2012
Location: Kentucky
Status: Offline
Points: 4185
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: Honey, I'm Home
    Posted: 05 October 2017 at 08:33
We’re back from our trip to the Outer Banks. There’s good news and bad news. First, the bad: the fishing sucked.

In what should have been one of the best weeks of the year we barely got out, as we were playing tag with the side effects of Maria. When we arrived Monday, the wind was a steady 40+ with gusts to about 57 MPH. Things deteriorated the next two days.

Give you an idea how bad it was, even without landfall; Ocracoke and Hatteras Islands had a mandatory evacuation for visitors.

The good news? Well, that falls into two groups. First, the hotel where we stayed---Comfort Inn on the Ocean---couldn’t have been a better choice. Despite trying times, as they coped with the influx of displaced visitors to the lower islands, everyone, from the housekeepers and maintenance workers to the front desk people always had a radiant smile and a friendly word. Special kudos go to Leslie and Lynsi, but that’s only because we interacted with them more than others. The fact is, the whole staff justly deserves high praise.

The room itself was large, spacious, and had a balcony overlooking the ocean. Although an older building, you’d only know it from the architectural style. None of the shabbiness you often find in older hotels. Instead, it is well maintained and modern in all respects. I’d recommend it to anyone.

Second, the food. Coastal North Carolina is seafood central, and we took full advantage of it. All the standard preparations are available everywhere, along with some really special dishes. Of course, the season on them being in, they had Barbara at “soft-shell crab.” In fact, we hadn’t even checked-in to the hotel, but stopped first for lunch at Henry’s, where she had her first softie in too long a while.

Far and away, the most creative dish we tried was Jolly’s Delight, at the Jolly Roger. This consisted of a lump crab cake on a smoked Gouda grits cake, with a Cajun bacon cream sauce. A beautiful dish to look at, and even better to eat.

Also at Jolly Roger was the best modern she-crab soup I’ve ever eaten. I stress “modern” because I’ve been fortunate enough to enjoy classic she-crab, which is a bisque that includes crab roe. It is no longer legal to keep female crabs with an egg mass, so the original can no longer be made. But Jolly Roger’s version comes close.

You wouldn’t think there was anything new in the way of oysters. But we found one at Awful Arthur’s Oyster Bar. Oysters Arthur are on broiled on the half shell with bacon, cocktail sauce, and Parmesan. I probably could have eaten several dozen of them, but the main meal was calling. This time it was fried grouper, which I ordered only because grouper is cost prohibitive at home. Last time I looked it was something like $19/pound

As everyone on the boards knows, I’m a shrimp & grits freak. Had to have at least one version. Carolina Shrimp & Grits, as prepared at Barefoot Bernie’s, is a little different, consisting of the shrimp-covered grits with andouille sausage and red-eye gravy.

Of course, we didn’t skimp on standards. At Miller’s Seafood Restaurant, for instance, I went with crab cakes (how could I not) while Barbara enjoyed broiled sea trout. That’s a fish we never see at all, at home, at any price. A shame, really, because it’s a great tasting one.

Interestingly, when I grew up, they were called “weakfish,” because their mouths are so soft it was easy to break off. Haven’t heard that term in years, and they’re now identified by which of the two species they are: gray sea trout, and speckled sea trout---which is the one most sought after for the table.

So, while the fishing was a disappointment, the food made up for it.


But we hae meat and we can eat
And sae the Lord be thanket
Back to Top
pitrow View Drop Down
Chef
Chef
Avatar

Joined: 22 November 2010
Location: Newberg, Oregon
Status: Offline
Points: 791
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote pitrow Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 October 2017 at 10:30
Sounds like a great trip in spite of the fishing! welcome back. 
Mike
Life in PitRow - My often neglected, somewhat eccentric, occasionally outstanding blog
Back to Top
HistoricFoodie View Drop Down
Master Chef
Master Chef


Joined: 21 February 2012
Location: Kentucky
Status: Offline
Points: 4185
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 October 2017 at 10:36
Just getting away for awhile rejuvenates, Mike. So, yeah, while the fishing was a disappointment it was a good trip overall.

And talk about inspiration. I've definitely got the Jolly's Delight and Arthur's oysters on my to-do list. Neither of them seem particularly difficult.

But we hae meat and we can eat
And sae the Lord be thanket
Back to Top
Margi Cintrano View Drop Down
Master Chef
Master Chef
Avatar

Joined: 03 February 2012
Location: Madrid & Puglia
Status: Offline
Points: 5697
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Margi Cintrano Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 October 2017 at 16:25

Sounds like you had an extraordinary trip  .. 


Always a positive to travel to the sea / ocean ..   

www.guidepost.es
Gourmet´s Choice - Time Out In Spain ...

WEBSITE: www.visionsgourmandes.com
Back to Top
TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar

Joined: 25 January 2010
Location: Chinook, MT
Status: Offline
Points: 8039
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06 October 2017 at 09:29
I know that you were looking forward to the fishing, Brook; but it does sound like you had a very nice culinary tour of the region. That Jolly Roger sounds like something that needs further attention, in my opinion.

It is good to have you back, my friend -
If you are a visitor and like what you see, please click here and join the discussions in our community!
Back to Top
HistoricFoodie View Drop Down
Master Chef
Master Chef


Joined: 21 February 2012
Location: Kentucky
Status: Offline
Points: 4185
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06 October 2017 at 10:57
You're right about that, Ron.

Fortunately, I always try and go with the specials. Otherwise I'd still be trying to decide from Jolly Rogers' extensive menu. Just a couple of their other choices: Shrimp & Crab Norfolk, Jolly's Stuffed Flounder (flounder filled with a crabmeat delight, served with a light tomato cream sauce), and a seafood version of Fettuccine Alfredo, to which is added your choice of shrimp, scallops, or crab.

This is not to detract from the many other great restaurants on the OBX. In all the years we've travelled there, we've never had a bad seafood dish. Well, one exception. One year, due to circumstances, we had dinner at one of the seafood buffet places. Overpriced, overcooked, and under seasoned.

To me, the only off-note is that almost everyone includes snow crab legs on their menu. It escapes me, with all of the great, locally sourced seafood available, why anyone would choose an imported ingredient.

But we hae meat and we can eat
And sae the Lord be thanket
Back to Top
 Post Reply Post Reply
  Share Topic   

Forum Jump Forum Permissions View Drop Down



This page was generated in 0.109 seconds.