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Hot & Sour Soup Recipe?

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TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26 February 2012 at 11:13
sounds pretty good!
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HistoricFoodie View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26 February 2012 at 12:42
Oh, it is, it is, Ron. Well worth the effort of making.
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KateC View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote KateC Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 April 2012 at 13:14
amazon.com has a vast variety of specialty foods available. I many cases if you buy $25.00 the shipping is free. If you look on amazon for lily buds, they're listed as golden needles.
Historic Foodie - If you live that fur into the woods, can't you just go and shoot you some of dem thar  bones? Smile 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 April 2012 at 13:36
Only during deer season, Kate. And I do utilize them to make stock and such. But I reserve the venison stock for other purposes.
 
I'm not all that fur back in the woods. It's just that the markets here don't carry stuff that's taken for granted in other places. When we shop we have to travel to Lexington (35 miles away), and visit as many as 8 places just to find what we consider basics.
 
This is an especial hardship for somebody bred and buttered in the Big Apple, where, literally, anything is available any hour of the day or night.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 April 2012 at 13:40
I'm fully aware of Amazon---and a couple of dozen other suppliers I can name. The problem is, when I'm looking for something it's usually only one or two items. Their value never adds up to all that much. So I can't take advantage of any free shipping offers. Alas!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote KateC Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 April 2012 at 13:48
I'm sure you know I was joking! I hear you lound and clear. I went from years of living in cities to Portland, Maine being the big city and a mere 50 miles away. Sometimes the simplest things become major challenges here in the cultural outback! SmileKate
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Rod Franklin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 April 2012 at 15:14
Cultural outbackLOLI laffed.
Hungry
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Melissa Mead Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 May 2013 at 09:31
I just tried making a lower-sodium version of hot and sour soup. Sort of. It doesn't look like any hot and sour soup I've ever seen.
This came out creamy yellow and contains no mushrooms, lily buds, or tofu. It's completely inauthentic, cobbled together from stuff I had on hand.

And y’know what? If you close your eyes, it’s like you’re eating hot and sour soup! Or something similar but much less salty, anyway. It actually has the right mouthfeel. And it’s hot and sour. Nice when you've got a cold, too.

If you’re curious, here’s the recipe:

1 32-oz box of low-sodium chicken stock
1 egg (I used a duck egg.)
1 can Kame no salt added stir-fry vegetables
2 tbsp red pepper oil (Or maybe less. My mouth was burning. Then again, H&SS does that.)
2 tbsp chive vinegar
1 tbsp balsamic vinegar
½ tsp sugar
½ tsp crushed garlic
Pinch white pepper
1 Chinese takeout packet of soy sauce

Put the veggies, half the stock, the vinegar, garlic, sugar and pepper in the soup pot (or awesome multicooker device) to simmer. Put the egg, soy sauce, and oil in a stick blender carafe. Put the remaining stock in a measuring cup and microwave it until it’s hot.
Start stick-blending the egg mixture, and temper it by slowly drizzling in the hot stock. When it’s all blended and hot (and foamy), stir it in with the veggies. Let simmer for 20 minutes. Enjoy.

(It reheats well, too.)
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 May 2013 at 10:22
It's completely inauthentic

Whatever that means, Melissa.

The ultimate test is, did you like what it tasted like? And, apparently, you did. To me, that's what counts.

I suspect the "off" color came from the canned veggies. Chances are, too, that if you'd have used beef stock your version would have more resembled the dark color we're used to.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Melissa Mead Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 04 May 2013 at 11:04
I figured it probably usually has more soy sauce, too. And the egg yolk probably added some yellowness.

I miss the tofu, but overall, it's good.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote priya456 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 August 2017 at 00:34
  1. Peel the garlic and deseed the chillies, then roughly chop and place into a pestle and mortar. Bash with a pinch of salt to a rough paste. Peel, finely chop and add the ginger, then bash until broken down and combined.
  2. Finely slice the mushrooms and bamboo shoots. Heat a lug of oil in a large wok or heavy-based saucepan over a medium-high heat, add the mushrooms and fry for 4 minutes, or until lightly golden. Stir in the chilli paste and bamboo shoots and fry for a further minute.
  3. Meanwhile, mix together 3 tablespoons of soy, 4 tablespoons of rice wine vinegar, the honey and a good pinch of white pepper. Stir the mixture into the pan and cook for a minute, then pour in the hot stock and bring gently to the boil. Reduce the heat to low and simmer for 10 minutes, or until slightly reduced. Meanwhile, chop the tofu into 1cm cubes, finely slice the spring onions and chives and whisk the egg well.
  4. Once reduced, remove the soup from the heat. Using a chopstick, stir the soup in a clockwise direction until you get a little whirlpool, then slowly add the beaten egg, stirring continuously to form thin ribbons. Stir in the tofu and return to the heat for 1 minute to warm through. Season to taste with soy and vinegar, then serve immediately with the spring onions and chives scattered on top.
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