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Hungarian Farmhouse Bread

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    Posted: 04 June 2013 at 09:21
In her recipe for Kolbaszos Paprika Krumpli (http://www.foodsoftheworld.activeboards.net/in-search-of-the-real-paprikas-krumpli_topic3549.html?SID=98671541855f3952d1591zddf83cz6795717593), Chef Clara M. Czegeny suggests it be served with Hungarian white bread. So, as is usual in such cases, I turned to Ingram and Shapter’s “The Breads of the World and How to Bake Them At Home.” It’s my go-to book for international bread types.

Sure enough, there’s a recipe for Hungarian Split Farmhouse Loaf. Here’s it is:

4 cups white flour (I use bread flour, but all-purpose would work)
2 tsp salt
½ tsp fennel seeds, crushed
1 tbls sugar
¾ oz fresh yeast (sub 2 tsp active dry)
1 1/8 cups lukewarm water
2 tbls butter, melted

For the topping:

1 egg white
Pinch of salt
2 tsp fennel seeds for sprinkling

Lightly grease a baking sheet. (as indicated in my bread primer, I no longer do this. Sprinkling the sheet with cornmeal or semolina is all that’s necessary)

Combine the flour and salt in a large bowl and stir in the crushed fennel seeds and sugar. Make a well in the center.

In a small bowl, mix the yeast with a little water, stir in the rest, then pour into the center of the flour. Stir in enough flour to make a runny batter. Sprinkle with more of the flour on top, cover, and let sit in a warm place for 30 minutes or until the sponge starts to bubble and rise.

Add the melted butter and gradually mix in with the remaining flour to form a dough. Turn out onto a lightly floured surface and knead for 8-10 minutes (4-5 minutes if using a stand mixer) until smooth and elastic. Place in a lightly oiled bowl, cover with lightly oiled plastic wrap and let rise, in a warm place, for 45-60 minutes or until doubled in bulk.

Turn out onto a lightly floured surface and punch down. Shape into an oval and place on the prepared baking sheet. Cover with lightly oiled plastic wrap and let rise, in a warm place, for 30-40 minutes or until doubled in size.

Meanwhile, preheat the oven to 425F.
Combine the egg white and salt and brush this glaze over the loaf. Sprinkle with fennel seeds and then, using a sharp knife, slash along its length. Bake for 20 minutes, then reduce the oven temperature to 350F and bake for 10 minutes or until it sounds hollow when tapped on the bottom.

Transfer to a wire rack to cool.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 June 2013 at 12:24
Brook - this is the same bread I've had my eye on as i peruse the book. It seems to me as if it exudes simple, rural peasant life.
 
 
 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Effigy Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 June 2013 at 22:06
Guess what's for Sunday lunch in my house! Sounds great to have with just cheese, cold cuts and pickle.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote africanmeat Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22 June 2013 at 05:14
Thanks Brook .
My Mother used to do this bread in Romania . i grew up on it .
Ahron
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote MarkR Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22 June 2013 at 06:23
Sounds really good! Bet it would go really nicely with the Minestroni I have to make for school today! Maybe I can sneak it in while the chicken stock is simmering.
Mark R
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22 June 2013 at 07:00
Mark, I agree. It would go great with the soup.

Ahron, that follows, as so many foods of that region are held in common among countries.

Anne:.....and some good country butter!

One modification I would make, though, is to actually grind the fennel seed rather than merely crushing it. The finer you make it, the better it's flavor infuses into the bread.

I made this as per the instructions as a free-standing loaf. Next time I'm going to try it as a sandwich loaf, cuz it seems ideal for that.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06 July 2013 at 08:47
For a change of pace, I made this bread in the form of Santa Lucia buns.

I then made my Lamb Patties Afrique sized to fit the buns, rested them on a bed of Lebanese olive salad, and topped with tzatziki.

Delicious!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Margi Cintrano Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06 July 2013 at 08:59
Brook, your bread sounds wonderful ...

All my best.
Margi.
Volamos a Mediterraneo, un paraiso que conquista su gente u su cocina.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 08 June 2014 at 08:37
As part of the Hungarian Themed dinner I made this bread again, substituting 1 cup of rye flour for the white. If anything it's even better.

Just thought I'd toss that out for anyone interested.
But we hae meat and we can eat
And sae the Lord be thanket
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