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Hunter's Vension Stew (J채gerpf채nnle)

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TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
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    Posted: 03 February 2010 at 11:24
This recipe comes from a hunter in germany with whom I have been corresponding for some time now. I consider him a good friend who is always willing to share pictures and information혻from the many places he has hunted and visited, including Germany, Spain, Finland and elsewhere.혻Hunting has a long and honored tradition in Germany, and hunters are treated with great respect there.

Below is혻my friend's혻method for making a hunter's venison stew. In his case, it was prepared with혻roe deer, but any venison can be혻used. I didn't get the chance to try it last fall due to a couple of complications, but fully intend to do so at some point.

Quote The roe deer stew we cooked is made from the "hunter's right," that is the organs: basically the tongue, heart, liver and kidneys. Remember that traditionally the hunting was a priviledge of the so-called "noble" classes who employed people as hunters, trackers, dogsmen, and so on. Later on, a lot of the hunting was done by foresters employed by the royal forestry administrations. These people not only helped to organize the big hunts for the courts and high burgeoisie, they also did the hunting/culling of females to control population. The carcass with the valuable meat belonged to the landowner, however the hunter who shot the animal had the privilege or "small hunter's right" to keep the organs, if he was granted the "large right," he could keep the trophy, too. Today, if you shoot and gut an animal, you can keep the organs, too, no matter where you are or hunt, this is a generally accepted tradition. If you gut an animal for someone else, the organs are yours, too.

I feed the tongue to my dog as I just don't like the looks of it. The rest (heart, liver, kidneys) I clean and cut in small pieces which I season for some time (one day is enough) into a mixture of balsamic vingar, olive oil, black and sweet red powdered pepper (paprika). Then I fry some chopped onions, add the heart first (it is in fact a muscle, not an organ, even though very tender and said to transmit to the one who kills the animal and eats it the courage and strength, it takes longer to cook), then the rest of the meat.

Add some red wine, cover and let simmer to obtain some gravy; You can also fry it with apple rings.

I eat it with rice, prepared South American style: Heat some olive oil, add onions, fry the dry rice a little, then add the very same amount of water and let cook on very slow heat until done, you might have to add some additional water, check, but don't add too much, you don't want the rice to be wet, rather dry.

Sp채tzle of course are also an excellent side dish.


Here's how it looks:



It must be pretty good because it didn't last too long!

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TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 October 2010 at 11:51
Saturday night, my oldest son decided to get in touch with his german heritage and made an antelope version of J채gerpf채nnle. he followed the recipe pretty much as described and even used the tongue, which we had removed while field dressing along with the heart, liver and kidneys. heart and liver we always keep, but this was the first time with the tongue and kidneys. the tongue was a little....weird....to work with and skinning it was a whole new experience; the kidneys were similarly interesting.  as for the final product, he served it on mashed potatoes and seemed to enjoy it. the smell was a little strange in a kitchen environment and was full of the prairie that the antelope came from. i do not normally eat heart or liver, but i did try a little for this occasion. the flavour was actually pretty darn good! the texture of liver is not my favourite thing, and i wasn't ready to try kidney or tongue yet, so i left it at that. we will try this again with deer, just because, and get pix....
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Hoser Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20 October 2010 at 02:09
I'm with you on most of the organ meats Ron. I do love liver though...only problem is that it's almost 100% cholesterol and I know I certainly don't need any. The meal looked delicious, but not having had any tongue I really am having a hard time associating it with anything I'm familiar with.

Congrats to your son for coming up with a dish that you will all remember!Thumbs Up
Go ahead...play with your food!
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TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13 November 2017 at 14:40
Just a follow-up to this: my youngest son collected "the hunter's right" with the deer that he recently shot. He did not make this stew, but he is trying several things.

Anyway, I did finally try some of the kidney, and it was not bad at all. My life is very hectic right now, but if I manage to get a deer this year, I will be collecting "the hunter's right" as well. I usually use the heart and liver to make a Slovak/Hungarian sausage (known respectively as Jaternica/Hurka), but will probably devote the other components to a stew that is similar to this.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Margi Cintrano Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 November 2017 at 08:41
Wow .. 

Definitely sounds wonderful ..  
 
Volamos a Mediterraneo, un paraiso que conquista su gente u su cocina.
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