Foods of the World Forum Homepage
Forum Home Forum Home > Food Groups > Fruits, Nuts, Fungi and Vegetables
  New Posts New Posts RSS Feed - Italian beans, Romano beans or giant haricots?
  FAQ FAQ  Forum Search   Events   Register Register  Login Login

This site is completely supported by donations; there are no corporate sponsors. We would be honoured if you would consider a small donation, to be used exclusively for forum expenses.



Thank you, from the Foods of the World Forums!

Italian beans, Romano beans or giant haricots?

 Post Reply Post Reply
Author
Message
ChrisFlanders View Drop Down
Chef's Apprentice
Chef's Apprentice
Avatar

Joined: 01 March 2012
Location: Flanders
Status: Offline
Points: 343
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote ChrisFlanders Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: Italian beans, Romano beans or giant haricots?
    Posted: 27 July 2012 at 07:36

We call these beans "snijbonen" which mean "beans to be cut". I had to look it up, seems the name Italian beans is used in english or Green Romano beans?? The french call them "haricots sabre" which needs no further explanation. They are indeed kind of haricots on steroids.

Here are 2 easy everyday recipes, both made recently, both having pork meat as a companion. Perfect match, haricots and pork if you ask me!

1. Pork in a sauce "Cross and Blackwell";

Cut the beans on an angle as thin or wide as you prefer. Plunge in boiling salted water for around 8 minutes, but, just fish a few out of the boiling water to check how "done" they are. Pour in a colander when done and refresh asap under cold water. Melt a little butter on low fire, add a chopped onion and let it turn translucent. Add the beans, s&p and nutmeg. Done!

Pork; fry the slices of meat until done, remove from the pan, deglaze the pan with a cup or so of white wine and/or vealstock or plain water, let reduce. Add cream, stir and let thicken for a while. Now add a generous tbsp or two of preferably very chunky piccalilly. Best to keep from the heat to avoid the sauce to split.

This classic sauce was originally made with the english piccalilly brand "Cross and Blackwell".

2. Pork tenderloin in a mustard sauce;

Almost same preparation of beans, except that these are a bit larger chunks. I added a little mild chili when sauteeing them.

Pork; very slowly cooked tenderloin (as a whole) on low fire together with a few whole cloves of garlic. When halfway done, add just a little white wine. When done, remove the meat from the pan, deglaze the pan with some water or stock, let reduce if necessary. Add cream and stir. Let simmer for a while. Away from the fire, add a good tbsp of Dijon mustard or the one of your preference. Note; adding mustard can easily split a hot creamsauce!

Back to Top
Sponsored Links


Back to Top
TasunkaWitko View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar

Joined: 25 January 2010
Location: Chinook, MT
Status: Offline
Points: 9301
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27 July 2012 at 08:41
They sure look good, Chris - I especially love that plated picture with the pork and mustard sauce!
 
Thanks for the informative post!
If you are a visitor and like what you see, please click here and join the discussions in our community!
Back to Top
AK1 View Drop Down
Master Chef
Master Chef
Avatar

Joined: 10 April 2012
Location: Ontario, Canada
Status: Offline
Points: 1081
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote AK1 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27 July 2012 at 13:36
Looks fantastic Chris!!
I know what I'm making for dinner tonight.

I have to say, your photography looks great. I honestly think, at the risk of offending some people, you could make a dog turd on a plate look appetizing.

Getting back on topic, got the pork, got the beans, got Picallily sauce. I'm good to go!!
Back to Top
Rod Franklin View Drop Down
Chef
Chef
Avatar

Joined: 17 February 2010
Location: USA
Status: Offline
Points: 921
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Rod Franklin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27 July 2012 at 17:26
Chris, your presentations are, as always, great! Photography is perfect. Always a pleasure.
Hungry
Back to Top
AK1 View Drop Down
Master Chef
Master Chef
Avatar

Joined: 10 April 2012
Location: Ontario, Canada
Status: Offline
Points: 1081
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote AK1 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27 July 2012 at 19:11
Wow!!! Tasty, tasty, tasty

Thank you so much for that recipe. It was delicious. 

I was going to post a picture, but it did not look as good as yours.
Back to Top
ChrisFlanders View Drop Down
Chef's Apprentice
Chef's Apprentice
Avatar

Joined: 01 March 2012
Location: Flanders
Status: Offline
Points: 343
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote ChrisFlanders Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 July 2012 at 04:52
Glad you liked it, Darko! And thanks guys for the compliments. I like to spend some more attention to presenting everyday dishes like this. It sharpens the appetite of everyone on the table.
My attention goes to simplicity and not overcrowding the plates. A little trick I already mentioned some time ago; use slightly larger plates, the 365+ collection of... Ikea has the ones I use above!
 
Don't know about all of you, but my choice of the dish of the day starts mostly with looking for which vegetable I'm going to prepare and then add the rest; meat, sauce, starch or no starch. I think it may mostly have to do with the fact that we have a wide range of good seasonal veggies available here. Meat is second violin in deciding what to cook.
Back to Top
Hoser View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar

Joined: 06 February 2010
Location: Cumberland, RI
Status: Offline
Points: 3453
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Hoser Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29 July 2012 at 02:48
An informative post indeed...I have never seen those particular types of beans on this side of the pond, but perhaps at a farmer's market or maybe at Whole Foods I'll be able to pick some up.
Go ahead...play with your food!
Back to Top
HistoricFoodie View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group


Joined: 21 February 2012
Location: Kentucky
Status: Offline
Points: 4891
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29 July 2012 at 05:24
I'm really surprised to hear that, Dave. Romano type beans used to be fairly common all over the East Coast.
 
Of course, once supermarkets all but replaced greengrocers, none of us have quite the choices we used to. But I'd imagine somebody is selling them at a local Farmer's Market.
Back to Top
Margi Cintrano View Drop Down
Master Chef
Master Chef
Avatar

Joined: 03 February 2012
Location: Spain
Status: Offline
Points: 6258
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Margi Cintrano Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29 July 2012 at 10:47
Gentlemen, Buonasera,
They are called Judias Verdes in the Iberian Peninsula.
They are very sweet and delicious in a multitude of cooking methods and combine lovely with numerous ingredients.
 
Thanks for the post. Lovely recipe.
 
Ciao.
Margaux Cintrano.
Volamos a Mediterraneo, un paraiso que conquista su gente u su cocina.
Back to Top
 Post Reply Post Reply
  Share Topic   

Forum Jump Forum Permissions View Drop Down



This page was generated in 0.109 seconds.