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It's That Time of Year

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HistoricFoodie View Drop Down
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    Posted: 10 September 2016 at 07:45
Anyone else been putting foods by this season? Gardening, for me, was a fiasco, for various reasons. But we have several great farmer’s markets in the area, especially the Madison Cty. Farmer’s Market, right here in Richmond. So we were more than able to take up the slack that way.

In fact, we just gifted our regular vendors with some of the herbal vinegars Friend Wife puts up, by way of saying “thank you for feeding us all season.”

I’m almost done. At least for awhile.

So far we’ve put up two bushels of tomatoes, mostly diced, but with some sauce and juice as well. We about doubled the amount done last year, because we ran out.

I had to renew my tomato power too, so sliced enough for four trays in the dehydrator. I let them go to the crisp stage, then ground them. Got almost a pint of powder from that. We use it primarily as a component in our taco seasoning, so we should be in good shape until next year’s crop comes in.

I put up a canner load of sweet pickle relish, in 12 ounce jars. Sweet pickle relish is an integral part of our home-made thousand island dressing, and we go through a lot of it.

This has been a good year for beets, and I put up a canner load of spiced beet chips, also in pints. That should see us through next year easily.

Earlier I renewed my seafood cocktail sauce, putting it by in half-pints. Only did half the recipe, but even that is a bunch of sauce. The recipe starts with a gallon of ketchup, so you can imagine how much is produced even by halving it.

Two more projects to go, and I’m done for a while. I have to renew my mustards---we’re down to a half-pint each of Irish and German. And I just realized we used the last of our canned squash, so will put up a canner load of them, likely in quarts.

I was just given a great sounding recipe, from one of our regular suppliers, for turnip kraut. If the turnips come in, in a reasonable amount of time, I might try that, too.

Who else has been canning stuff?


But we hae meat and we can eat
And sae the Lord be thanket
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Percebes View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Percebes Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10 September 2016 at 17:29
I put up some Honey Pickled Beets today, but perhaps I should have waited for you to post your Spiced Beet Chips recipeSmile

Would that be a request that you would be willing to consider?
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11 September 2016 at 06:23
Sure thing.

My recipe is an adaptation of a classic, which starts by cooking the beets. Instead, I run them raw through one of the Spirilizer blades, which produces shards (thus, chips). These then get cooked in the brine until tender (takes about 45 minutes or so).

Here's the basic recipe:

Spicy Pickled Beets

4 lbs beets, cooked and peeled
3 cups onions, sliced thin
2 1/2 cups cider vinegar
1 1/2 cups water
1 tsp salt
2 cups sugar
1 tbls mustard seed
1 tsp whole allspice berries
1 tsp whole cloves
2 cinnamon sticks, broken

Combine all ingredients except beets in a large saucepan. Bring to boil, reduce heat, and simmer five minutes. Add beets and cook until heated. Remove cinnamon sticks.

Pack hot beets into hot jars, leaving ¼ inch headspace. Pour hot pickling liquid over beets, leaving ¼ inch headspace. Process 30 minutes in a boiling water bath.

Yield: About four pints.

If you use the original recipe, fwiw, I much prefer roasting the beets to boiling them.

Enjoy!
But we hae meat and we can eat
And sae the Lord be thanket
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Percebes Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11 September 2016 at 07:25
Thank you Brook

My spiralizer is about 30 years old and does not have much for blade options.

It can make 1/4" corkscrew shapes or thin strands that end up looking like a birds nest.

I am challenged in picturing the size of your shards/chips in my mind and why they would then take approx 45 minutes to become tender if they are shaped before cooking.

Off to get more beets and I will figure something out.
The whole idea of moving away from cubes or slices is quite appealing to me.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 September 2016 at 06:10
If you imagine a slice broken into two or three pieces, that would be the shards.

Reason they came out that way is these were larger beets, with internal cracks. The result is the same as if you'd scored them lengthwise.

Another fun one, for those with a spiralizer, is to run parsnips through it, to make ribbons. Then deep fry them. Delicious, especially when sprinkled with ginger salt.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 September 2016 at 06:11
BTW, I can't explain why they take so long to cook, in the brine. Only that they do.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote pitrow Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 September 2016 at 09:44
I had plans to, but they mostly fell through. Had to throw away a bunch of apples and some plums that I had wanted to can/dehydrate but life got in the way and they went bad before I could get to them. So far the only thing I've been able to get to is dehydrating some figs and canning a small batch of hatch pepper sauce. 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Percebes Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 September 2016 at 21:02
Originally posted by HistoricFoodie HistoricFoodie wrote:

BTW, I can't explain why they take so long to cook, in the brine. Only that they do.

It seems to make sense now that I ponder it. Both the acid in the vinegar and the sugar in the brine would act to strengthen the vegetable fiber.
Typically I pre-cook my beets simmering in water or by roasting-cool and peel then slice and then give them a few minutes simmer time in the brine before packing in the jars.

All is good in the neighborhoodSmile

Thanks again for the detail and the recipe.

You have also precipitated the need for a trip to the market this weekend for Parsnips.

Hate to ask-But-LOL 
I am dying to know how your Ginger Salt is made.

The concept of that dish is incredibly intriguing to me.
I am a wine enthusiast. The more wine I drink, the more enthusiastic I become.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HistoricFoodie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 13 September 2016 at 10:45
No real recipe on the ginger salt. I just mix equal parts (eyeballing it)of fine sea salt and powdered ginger.

As usual with fried foods, you want to season the parsnips when they're right out of the oil.
But we hae meat and we can eat
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote TasunkaWitko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 September 2016 at 17:22
I didn't get any cucumbers grown this year, but I did buy about 13.5 pounds from some Hutterites at the farmer's market in Great Falls this weekend. They are the smaller "gherkin" type, mostly about 3.5 to 4 inches in length, with many curled.

http://foodsoftheworld.activeboards.net/our-recipe-for-kosherstyle-dill-pickles_topic3251.html

Using my recipe, and packing the jars tightly, I was able to fill 11 quart-sized jars - but the bottom of one jar broke in the canner for no reason I could see, and I ended up with 10 quarts. Luckily, we were able to salvage the pickles themselves; I "marinated" them in some vinegar, water and pepper and we served them with supper, so they fortunately did not go to waste.


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