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Jellied Moose Nose

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Joined: 06 February 2010
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    Posted: 21 November 2010 at 05:56
I've been trying to expand our Canadian section a little bit, and here is an unusual recipe I found from the great white north.


Jellied Moose Nose
  • 1 upper jawbone of a moose
  • 1 onion, sliced
  • 1 garlic clove, crushed
  • 1 Tbsp pickling spice
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon pepper
  • 1/4 cup vinegar
Cut the upper jaw bone of the moose off just below the eyes.
Place in a large pot of boiling water, and cook for 45 minutes.
Remove and chill in cold water.
When cool enough to handle, pull out all the hairs...they should be loosened by the boiling and come out fairly easily. Wash well, until no hairs remain.
Place nose in a pot and cover with water, then add all remaining ingredients.
Bring to a boil, then reduce heat and simmer until the meat is tender.
Let the meat cool overnight in the liquid.

When cool, take the meat out of the broth and discard the bones and cartilage.
You will have two kinds of meat...white meat from the nose, and dark meat from along the bones and jowls.
Slice the meat very thinly and alternate layers of white and dark meat in a loaf pan.
Reheat the broth to boiling, and pour over the meat in the loaf pan.
Let cool until the jelly has set, then slice and serve.


Go ahead...play with your food!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 November 2010 at 07:30
Oh wow....never could have imagined this at all. Now that i think about it, why not? We use everything but the squeal on mr. porky......use everything but the bellow of the moose  LOL You know this would probably make great Polish "head cheese" which is what the recipe seems to be. I'm sure if there had been...mooses? meese? in the Ukraine or Poland mom would have used them too!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Hoser Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22 November 2010 at 02:26
That's what I thought immediately when I found it John..."Head Cheese"
Go ahead...play with your food!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 December 2010 at 07:27
You know, as gross as the idea of eating "moose nose" is, I would like to try it. Every year we buy half a steer from a local cattleman (who also happens to be my barber!). Next year I'm going to ask the meat processor to save me the cow nose part and try this meself! We picked up this year's meat about 3 weeks ago, so I'll have to wait. Hug
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Boilermaker Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 05 December 2010 at 10:51
I'm afraid you guys are on your own with cow noses and faces and the like.  My grandparents were Germans and I was scarred early in life by the sight of headcheese, they called it souse, and blutwurst.  Yech!!!  I like a lot of organ meats and such but the two aforementioned ones I just can't handle.  Best of luck, though, in your endeavours to make the olfactory organs of large ruminants into an edible delicacy. 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Montana Maddness Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 07 December 2010 at 14:20
With ya on this one Boilermaker. That just sounds like crap to me.
Hotter the better bring on the peppers!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote drinks Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03 May 2015 at 15:59
I realize this is very old, but has anyone tried "barbacoa de cabeza"?
Very common in the border region of Texas and Mexico, in this case, the entire head is used after the brains and eyes are eliminated with the removed meat being served on fresh corn tortillas .
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